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Friday, March 31, 2017

Original Production Animation Drawing of Cinderella from "Cinderella," 1950


Original production animation drawing of Cinderella in red, blue, and graphite pencils from "Cinderella," 1950, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 57 in pencils lower right and animation ladder and notes in pencils upper right; Size - Cinderella 8 1/2 x 4", Sheet 12 1/2 x 15 1/2"; Unframed. 

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

The 1950 Walt Disney feature film "Cinderella" was based on the French version of the tale by Charles Perrault, entitled "Cinderella" and written in 1698. The film was the second in the series of great Princess films developed by Disney, the first being Snow White in 1937. The character of Cinderella is usually front and center in the pantheon of Disney Princess merchandise, perhaps because she is the only Princess not to be of a noble blood line who ended up marrying a Prince and becoming royalty.

Cinderella was animated by both Marc Davis and Eric Larson, however the two animators had different perceptions of the character, with Davis preferring elegance and Larson opting for simplicity. This actually worked in the film's favor, resulting in Cinderella being a much more complicated character than her predecessor Snow White. As with other Disney films, the studio hired actress Helene Stanley to perform the live-action reference for Cinderella. She would later return to the studio for the characters of Aurora in "Sleeping Beauty," 1959 and Anita Radcliffe in "One Hundred and One Dalmatians," 1961.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Cinderella.

According to Christopher Finch, from his book "The Art of Walt Disney":
"Disney insisted that all scenes involving human characters should be shot first in live-action to determine that they would work before the expensive business of animation was permitted to start. The animators did not like this way of working, feeling it detracted from their ability to create character. The animators understood the necessity for this approach and in retrospect acknowledged that Disney had handled things with considerable subtlety."


Close up of the production number.

About 400 women and girls auditioned for the voice role of Cinderella, but the role ended up going to Ilene Woods. Woods, who at the time worked on the radio and did not know anything about the audition, was asked one day by her colleagues Mack David and Jerry Livingston to sing a song from Cinderella. Without her knowledge, her recording was given by her friends to Disney Studios. After listening to the material Walt Disney immediately decided that he had found the voice with which to speak and sing the character of Cinderella and contacted Ilene. 


Close up of the animation ladder and notes.

This is a wonderful and very delicate production drawing of Cinderella. She is masterfully rendered in graphite and red pencil. It is from the scene in the film, when during the stepsisters' music lesson, Cinderella brings in the invitation to the ball and asserts her eligibility to attend. As Anastasia and Drizella laugh at her intentions, Cinderella steps forward and asks: "Well, why not?" The scene was supervised by the great animation artist Les Clark, one of Walt Disney's master animators known as his "Nine Old Men."


Friday, March 24, 2017

Original Production Animation Drawing of Stromboli from "Pinocchio," 1940


Original production animation drawing in red, blue, and graphite pencils of Stromboli from "Pinocchio," 1940, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 145 in pencil lower right; Production number stamp lower right; Size - Stromboli 8 1/4 x 8 1/4", Sheet: 10 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Pinocchio," 1940 was the second animated feature film produced by Disney, and followed on the success of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." 1937. It was released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictures on February 23, 1940 and was based on the Italian children's novel "The Adventures of Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi. The general plot of the film involves an old wood-carver named Geppetto, who carves a wooden puppet that he names Pinocchio. One night the puppet is brought to life by the Blue Fairy, who informs him that he can become a real boy if he proves himself to be "brave, truthful, and unselfish". Pinocchio's journey to become a real boy is challenged by his encounters with an array of scrupulous characters.

"Pinocchio" became the first animated feature to win an Academy Award; it won for both Best Music - Original Score and for Best Music - Original Song for "When You Wish Upon A Star." Most critics and audiences agree that "Pinocchio" is among the finest Disney features ever made, and one of the greatest animated films of all time. In 1994, it was added to the United States National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."


Close up of the original animation drawing of Stromboli.

Although Pinocchio encounters a wide range of antagonists, two of the cruelest are the Coachman and Stromboli; the evil puppeteer, showman, and gypsy whose only goal was to make money. Both the Coachman and Stromboli were voiced by Charles Judes who added a heavy Italian accent. Stomboli is also the only Disney Villain who cursed, however it was obscured by being done in Italian.


Close up of the production stamp and the production number.

Hamilton Luske directed the live-action footage of most of the actors posing as characters for Pinocchio. Luske admitted to the fact that the character, acted by story man T. Hee dressed in full gypsy garb, was a bit understated but that he did not want Stromboli's animator Vladimir Tytla doing "too many things." Tyla was a tall and imposing personality and he had a physical build that was similar to that of Stromboli, which may account for him being given the character to animate. It is known that while Tytla was working out sequences for Stromobli in his room, that he would perform the story aloud and that Eric Larson stated that he "thought the walls would fall in." Obviously the performance worked because the villainous Stromboli is one of Walt Disney's greatest memorable villains!

This is a large, three quarter profile image of the evil puppet master Stromboli! The drawing is accomplished in red, blue, and graphite pencils. Stromboli is eyes and mouth open, and his large hands are beautifully rendered. A great pose and expression of this famous vintage Disney Villain!

Original Production Animation Drawing of the Coachman from "Pinocchio," 1940


Original production animation drawing of the Coachman in green, red, and graphite pencils from "Pinocchio," 1940, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 52 in pencil and production stamp lower right; Size - Coachman: 4 1/2 x 8", Sheet: 10 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

Foulfellow: "Pleasure Island? But the law! Suppose they..."
The Coachman: "No, no. There is no risk. They never come back... as BOYS!"

"Pinocchio," 1940 was the second animated feature film produced by Disney, and followed on the success of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." 1937. It was released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictures on February 23, 1940 and was based on the Italian children's novel "The Adventures of Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi. The general plot of the film involves an old wood-carver named Geppetto, who carves a wooden puppet that he names Pinocchio. One night the puppet is brought to life by the Blue Fairy, who informs him that he can become a real boy if he proves himself to be "brave, truthful, and unselfish". Pinocchio's journey to become a real boy is challenged by his encounters with an array of scrupulous characters.

"Pinocchio" became the first animated feature to win an Academy Award; it won for both Best Music - Original Score and for Best Music - Original Song for "When You Wish Upon A Star." Most critics and audiences agree that "Pinocchio" is among the finest Disney features ever made, and one of the greatest animated films of all time. In 1994, it was added to the United States National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."


Close up of the original drawing of the Coachman.

The Coachman is possibly the most evil of all the Disney villains. Unlike other villains who do not escape an ill fate: such as the Evil Queen who is struck by lighting, falls off a cliff, and is smashed by a falling bolder or Maleficent who is impaled by the Sword of Truth hurled by Prince Phillip; the Coachman has no such luck, and continues his purchase of stupid boys for their eventual conversion into donkeys that are then sold for gold.

The Coachman was voiced by Charles Judels who also provided the voice for another villain in Pinocchio, Stromboli. Everything surrounding the Coachman seems foreboding; from his long whip and his stagecoach used to transport the boys to Pleasure Island, to his henchman that appear to be dark featureless creatures carrying out his will.


Close up of the production stamp and the production number.

This is a spectacular drawing of the Coachman from his first scene in "Pinocchio" which occurs at the The Red Lobster Inn where he meets with Honest John (Foulfellow) and Gideon. All three are seen smoking, Honest John and Gideon both have cigars and The Coachman has a pipe. The Coachman states the he is "collecting stupid little boys" to take to Pleasure Island where they can "tear the place apart" and that "they never come back... as boys!" This is a wonderful green shaded drawing of the Coachman, both eyes are open, and his eye eyebrows are conveying a menacing look. He is holding his pipe in his right hand, and his mouth is open as he is talking to Honest John and Gideon.

Original Production Animation Drawing of Pinocchio from "Pinocchio," 1940


Original production animation drawing in red, green, and graphite pencils of Pinocchio from "Pinocchio," 1940, Walt Disney Studios; Production stamp and animation ladder lower right; Numbered C46 in pencil lower right; Size - Pinocchio and shadow: 6 1/2 x 6 1/2", Sheet: 10 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Pinocchio," 1940 was the second animated feature film produced by Disney, and followed on the success of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." 1937. It was released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictures on February 23, 1940 and was based on the Italian children's novel "The Adventures of Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi. The general plot of the film involves an old wood-carver named Geppetto, who carves a wooden puppet that he names Pinocchio. One night the puppet is brought to life by the Blue Fairy, who informs him that he can become a real boy if he proves himself to be "brave, truthful, and unselfish". Pinocchio's journey to become a real boy is challenged by his encounters with an array of scrupulous characters.

"Pinocchio" became the first animated feature to win an Academy Award; it won for both Best Music - Original Score and for Best Music - Original Song for "When You Wish Upon A Star." Most critics and audiences agree that "Pinocchio" is among the finest Disney features ever made, and one of the greatest animated films of all time. In 1994, it was added to the United States National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."


Close up of the original animation drawing of Pinocchio.

Due to the huge success of "Snow White," Walt Disney wanted more famous voice actors for "Pinocchio." He cast popular singer Cliff Edwards (who had made the first record selling over a million copies) as Jiminy Cricket. Disney also wanted the character of Pinocchio to be voiced by a real child. The role ended up going to twelve year old actor Dickie Jones, who had previously been in Frank Capra's enormous Hollywood hit, "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington."

Animation began in September 1938 and just as in "Snow White," live-action footage was shot for "Pinocchio" with the actors playing the scenes; which was supervised by Hamilton Luske. The animators then used the footage as a guide for their animation drawings by studying the human movement and then incorporating many of those poses and scenes. The title character was animated by Milt Kahl (initial design), Frank Thomas, and Ollie Johnston. "When I was doing Pinocchio," Johnston said, "I thought of the character being real, a living person, not a drawing."


Close up of the production stamp, production number, and animation ladder.

"Give a Little Whistle," one of the memorable songs featured in "Pinocchio," was composed by Leigh Harline with lyrics by Ned Washington. The song is sung by Jiminy Cricket (voiced by Cliff Edwards), and the performance and animation is one of the nicest sequences in the film. In the song, Jiminy tries to explain the matters of being a conscience to Pinocchio, and tells him if he needs him all he has to do is "give a little whistle." In this drawing, Pinocchio is imitating a motion done by Jiminy by whistling into his hat and then covering it with his hand. Unfortunately, unlike Jiminy, when he lifts his hand from the bottom of the hat the whistle can not be heard. This is a wonderful drawing from the "Give a Little Whistle" sequence and the image of a smiling Pinocchio is perfect. He is eyes and mouth open and his hand is covering the bottom of his hat. The drawing is rendered in red, green, and graphite pencils on peg hole animation paper; and there are production notes throughout the sheet, including the animation ladder in the bottom right corner. A great addition to any animation art collection.

Saturday, March 4, 2017

Complete 4 Page MisterJaw-Supershark Friz Freleng Hand Signed Storyboards from a "20 Second Bridge"


Complete 4 page MisterJaw-Supershark storyboards in blue, brown, light blue, purple, and graphite pencils from a "20 Second Bridge," Depatie-Freleng Studios; Signed Friz Freleng in black ink on each page; Size - Sheets: 8 1/2 x 14"; Unframed.


DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Close up of the Friz Freleng signature.


Original MisterJaw-Supershark storyboard page.


Close up of the Friz Freleng signature. 

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.


Original MisterJaw-Supershark storyboard page. 


Close up of the Friz Freleng signature. 

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

"Misterjaw" is a 34-episode cartoon series, produced at DePatie-Freleng Enterprises in 1976 for "The Pink Panther and Friends" television series on NBC. Misterjaw, a blue-colored great white shark wearing a purple vest with white collar, a black bow tie, and black top hat; was voiced by Arte Johnson. He spoke with a German accent, and mispronounced words such as "knucklehead" (which he pronounced as "ka-nucklehead"). One of his tricks was to leap out of the water and shout "HEEGotcha!" or "Gotcha!" at unsuspecting people. MisterJaw had a sidekick; a green-scaled, brown bowler wearing, Brooklyn-accented, catfish named Catfish. Catfish was voiced by Arnold Stang and usually referred to Misterjaw as "boss" or "chief."


Original MisterJaw-Supershark storyboard page. 


Close up of the Friz Freleng signature. 

Many of the episodes focused on Misterjaw and Catfish trying to catch Harry Halibut (voiced by Bob Ogle). Sometimes Misterjaw and Catfish were pursued by Fearless Freddy the Shark Hunter (voiced by Paul Winchell). The entire series was directed by Robert McKimson, co-directed by Sid Marcus, and produced by David H. DePatie and Friz Freleng. The music and score were composed by Doug Goodwin and all of the episodes included a laugh track.

This is an extremely rare complete 4 page MisterJaw-Supershark storyboard accomplished in blue, brown, light blue, purple, and graphite pencils from a "20 Second Bridge." Each page is hand signed in black ink by the master animator/director Friz Freleng. The 4 page storyboard set would have been used by the Depatie-Freleng Animation Department in order to map out and create the animated 20 second bumper or bridge segment. The bridge would have been used as a transition separator between animated shorts. A rare and beautiful piece of original animation artwork that is perfect for any collection!

Original Production Animation Cel of The Pink Panther Hand Signed by Friz Freleng from "Pink Pull," 1979


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cel of the Pink Panther signed by Friz Freleng from "Pink Pull," 1979," Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Production numbers left cel edges; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Pink Panther: 7 3/4 x 6", Image 9 3/4 x 11 1/4"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.


Original animation cel of the Pink Panther signed by Friz Freleng.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

This is a great cel of the Pink Panther from "Pink Pull," 1979. The story of the short is that The Pink Panther, while walking on the street, drops a coin that falls down a sewer grate. He buys a strong magnet, attempting to use it to get the coin back, but unfortunately the magnet is so strong it pulls the watch from a man at a bus stop; and the whistle, badge, and uniform buttons from a policeman. After all the chaos, when the Panther finally returns to the sewer grate, another man pulls up the coin with his own magnet. This is a wonderful cel of the Pink Panther, he is eyes open, holding a large magnet, and the coin can be seen flying past his head. In addition, the cel has been hand signed by Friz Freleng! A beautiful piece of animation artwork perfect for any collection.

Original Production Animation Cel and Matching Drawing of The Pink Panther from "Dietetic Pink," 1978


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cel of the Pink Panther from "Dietetic Pink," 1978," Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Production numbers lower cel edge; Set on a lithographic background; With matching original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther in blue pencil with production numbers lower sheet edge; Size - Pink Panther: 5 x 3 3/4", Image 9 3/4 x 11 1/4"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel and drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cel of the Pink Panther.


Original production animation cel of the Pink Panther showing the entire cel.


Close up of the original production animation cel of the Pink Panther.


Close up of the production numbers.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther.


Close up of the production numbers.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

This is a fantastic cel of the Pink Panther from "Dietetic Pink," 1978. The story of the short is that The Pink Panther is on a mission to lose weight after seeing his incorrect weight on a broken scale. This is a full figure, eyes open cel of the Pink Panther jumping rope; and with the matching original production animation drawing. A beautiful piece of animation artwork.

Original Production Animation Cel and Matching Drawing of The Pink Panther from "Pink S.W.A.T.," 1978


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cel of the Pink Panther from "Pink S.W.A.T.," 1978, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Production numbers lower cel edge; Set on a lithographic background; With matching original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther in blue pencil with production numbers lower sheet edge; Size - Pink Panther: 4 1/2 x 4 3/4", Image 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel and drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cel of the Pink Panther.


Original production animation cel of the Pink Panther showing the entire cel.


Close up of the original production animation cel of the Pink Panther.


Close up of the production numbers.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther.


Close up of the production numbers.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

This is a wonderful cel of the Pink Panther from "Pink S.W.A.T.," 1978. The story of the short is that The Pink Panther is relaxing at home reading a book, when a fly interrupts him. The fly eats his food, interrupts his violin practice, and is a general nuisance. The Panther tries lots of ways to get rid of the fly and even buys a frog suit in an attempt to scare it away. This is a great full figure, eyes open animation cel of the Pink Panther holding a vacuum cleaner trying to suck up the fly, and the matching original production animation drawing. A wonderful collection of original animation artwork perfect for any collection!

Original Production Animation Script from "Fantastic Four - The Way It All Began," 1967


Original production animation script from "Fantastic Four - The Way It All Began," 1967,  Hanna-Barbera Studios; 29 page script signed by Don Messick (voice of Kurrgo and the Skrull Emperor) in black ink; Size - Sheets: 11 x 8 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this script or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

Hanna-Barbera Productions, Inc. was an American animation studio that was founded in 1957 by former Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer animation directors William Hanna and Joseph Barbera (the creators of Tom and Jerry), and live-action director George Sidney. It is considered the very first animation studio to successfully produce animated cartoons made exclusively for television. The Hanna-Barbera Studio created cartoon shows for over 30 years including: Yogi Bear, The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Wacky Races, Scooby-Doo, and The Smurfs. William Hanna and Joe Barbera won seven Academy Awards, eight Emmy Awards, a Golden Globe Award, and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. They were also inducted into the Television Academy Hall of Fame in 1993.


Close up of Don Messick's name and signature, the voice of Kurrgo and the Skrull Emperor.


Example script page.

"Fantastic Four" was an animated cartoon produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions, and it was the first animated series based on Marvel's comic book of the same name. The series, featured character designs by the great cartoonist Alex Toth, and the show aired on ABC from 1967 to 1970. "Fantastic Four" lasted for 20 episodes (each episode was 22 minutes long), with repeat episodes airing on ABC until the network eventually cancelled the program. The show was also rerun as part of the continuing series "Hanna–Barbera's World of Super Adventure." The recurring voice actors for "Fantastic Four" were:

Paul Frees - The Thing/Benjamin J. Grimm, Uatu the Watcher, Additional Voices
Jac Flounders - Human Torch/Johnny Storm
Gerald Mohr - Mister Fantastic/Reed Richards
Jo Ann Pflug - Invisible Girl/Susan Storm Richards


Example script page.


Example script page.

Episode 7 "The Way It All Began" originally aired on September 23, 1967. The plot of the episode is that Reed recalls the time he first met Victor before he became Dr. Doom. Victor was working on a dangerous experiment that, got him expelled from the University, badly altered his face, and caused him to vow revenge on Reed. Ben and Reed became soldiers in WWII, and they along with Susan and Johnny go aboard a rocket for space exploration. During the flight they are transformed and gifted with amazing powers. Dr. Doom confronts the Fantastic Four, tells them about his own origin, and attempts to get his revenge; but ultimately fails.


Example script page.

This is an extremely rare original production animation script from Episode 7: "Fantastic Four - The Way It All Began," 1967. The 29 page script was used and hand signed by Don Messick, the voice of Kurrgo and the Skrull Emperor; and there are various notes regarding his dialog throughout the pages. This is a wonderful piece of animation art history and a great addition to any collection!

Original Production Animation Script from "Fantastic Four - Three Predictions of Dr. Doom," 1967


Original production animation script from "Fantastic Four - Three Predictions of Dr. Doom," 1967,  Hanna-Barbera Studios; 25 page script for Paul Frees (The Thing/Benjamin J. Grimm); Size - Sheets: 11 x 8 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this script or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

Hanna-Barbera Productions, Inc. was an American animation studio that was founded in 1957 by former Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer animation directors William Hanna and Joseph Barbera (the creators of Tom and Jerry), and live-action director George Sidney. It is considered the very first animation studio to successfully produce animated cartoons made exclusively for television. The Hanna-Barbera Studio created cartoon shows for over 30 years including: Yogi Bear, The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Wacky Races, Scooby-Doo, and The Smurfs. William Hanna and Joe Barbera won seven Academy Awards, eight Emmy Awards, a Golden Globe Award, and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. They were also inducted into the Television Academy Hall of Fame in 1993.


Close up of Paul Frees's name, the voice of The Thing/Benjamin J. Grimm.


Example script page.

"Fantastic Four" was an animated cartoon produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions, and it was the first animated series based on Marvel's comic book of the same name. The series, featured character designs by the great cartoonist Alex Toth, and the show aired on ABC from 1967 to 1970. "Fantastic Four" lasted for 20 episodes (each episode was 22 minutes long), with repeat episodes airing on ABC until the network eventually cancelled the program. The show was also rerun as part of the continuing series "Hanna–Barbera's World of Super Adventure." The recurring voice actors for "Fantastic Four" were:

Paul Frees - The Thing/Benjamin J. Grimm, Uatu the Watcher, Additional Voices
Jac Flounders - Human Torch/Johnny Storm
Gerald Mohr - Mister Fantastic/Reed Richards
Jo Ann Pflug - Invisible Girl/Susan Storm Richards


Example script page.

Episode 6 "Three Predictions of Dr. Doom" originally aired on October 28, 1967. The plot of the episode is that the Fantastic Four's arch villain Dr. Doom, seeks revenge. He begins his plans by capturing Susan Storm, and the other members soon manage to locate and enter Doom's flying fortress. But The Thing is turned back into Ben, and the other three members of the team become trapped. Ben manages to turn himself back into the Thing, frees the others, and they chase Dr. Doom. After a struggle through the dangerous complex of Doom's fortress, they manage to abort Dr. Doom's global destruction plans.


Example script page.

This is an extremely rare original production animation script from Episode 6: "Fantastic Four - Three Predictions of Dr. Doom," 1967. The 25 page script was used by Paul Frees the voice of The Thing/Benjamin J. Grimm, and there are various notes regarding his dialog throughout the pages. This is a wonderful piece of animation art history and a great addition to any collection!