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Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Complete 45 Page Pink Panther Xerographic Storyboard from "Toro Pink," 1979


Complete 45 page Pink Panther xerographic storyboard from "Toro Pink," 1979,  Depatie-Freleng Studios; Plate signed "Ok Friz" and hand signed Friz Freleng in ink center on page 1; Size - Sheets: 8 1/2 x 11"; Unframed.

To purchase this storyboard or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Close up of the plate signed "Ok Friz" and hand signed Friz Freleng in ink center on page 1.


Photograph of an example page from the Pink Panther xerographic storyboard.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.


Photograph of an example page from the Pink Panther xerographic storyboard.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Photograph of an example page from the Pink Panther xerographic storyboard.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

This is a wonderful 45 page Pink Panther xerographic storyboard from from "Toro Pink," 1979. The story of the short is that the Pink Panther is tricked, by the Bid Nose Guy, into a bullring in order to fight a bull. This 45 page storyboard set would have been used by the Depatie-Freleng Animation Department in order to map out and create the animated short. The storyboards have been plate signed "Ok Friz" and hand signed Friz Freleng in ink center on page 1. A rare and beautiful piece of animation artwork perfect for any collection!

Original Production Animation Cels of The Pink Panther signed by Friz Freleng & Door Cel from "Pink S.W.A.T.," 1978


Original hand painted & hand inked production animation cels of the Pink Panther signed by Friz Freleng & Door cel from "Pink S.W.A.T.," 1978, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Production numbers lower cel edges; Set on a lithographic background; With matching original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther in blue & graphite pencils with production numbers lower sheet edge; Size - Pink Panther: 4 x 4 1/4", Door: 6 1/4 x 2 1/2", Image 9 1/4 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase these cels and drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cel of the Pink Panther signed by Friz Freleng and a Door cel.


Original production animation cel of the Pink Panther signed by Friz Freleng without the background.


Close up of the original production animation cel of the Pink Panther signed by Friz Freleng.


Close up of the production numbers.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.


Original production animation cel of a Door without the background.


Close up of the production numbers.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther.


Close up of the production numbers.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

This is an absolutely spectacular multi-cel setup of the Pink Panther from "Pink S.W.A.T.," 1978. The story of the short is that The Pink Panther is relaxing at home reading a book, when a fly interrupts him. The fly eats his food, interrupts his violin practice, and is a general nuisance. The Panther tries lots of ways to get rid of the fly and even buys a frog suit in an attempt to scare it away. This is a great full figure, eyes open animation cel of the Pink Panther holding a fly swatter. The cel is hand signed by master animator/director Friz Freleng, and also included is the matching original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther and an original cel of a white door. A wonderful collection of original animation artwork perfect for any collection!

Monday, February 27, 2017

Original Production Animation Cel of Madame Medusa from "The Rescuers," 1977


Original hand-painted production animation cel of Madame Medusa from "The Rescuers," 1977, Walt Disney Studios; Set on a lithographic background; Numbered 21 in ink and with the Walt Disney seal lower right; Size - Madame Medusa: 9 x 5 1/4", Image 10 x 15 3/4"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"The Rescuers" is an animated feature film produced by Walt Disney Productions; and was released on June 22, 1977 by Buena Vista Distribution. The film is based on a series of books by Margery Sharp, most notably "The Rescuers and Miss Bianca." The 23rd film in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, the film is about the Rescue Aid Society; an international mouse organization headquartered in New York; and shadowed the United Nations. The Rescue Aid Society, a mouse based group, was dedicated to helping abduction victims around the world at large. Two of these mice, jittery janitor Bernard (voiced by Bob Newhart) and his co-agent, the elegant Miss Bianca (voiced by Eva Gabor), set out to rescue Penny, an orphan girl being held prisoner in the Devil's Bayou by treasure huntress Madame Medusa.


Original production animation cel of Madame Medusa without the background.

 Early designs for Medusa were done by Ken Anderson, there were even discussions about bringing back Cruella deVil from "101 Dalmatians" as the villain; but that was eventually abandoned. The character of Medusa was eventually created and although there are many similarities with Cruella (thin build, similar cars, appear wealthy, bad tempers, cry upon realizing that they have lost, etc.), Medusa is still quite distinct with her wild red hair, sagging breasts, green eyes, and lots and lots of makeup. Her ultimate goal in the film is to possess the Devil's Eye, the world's largest diamond. Milt Kahl was given the task of animating Medusa and it is known that one his inspirations was his ex-wife. Kahl's brilliance in animation is really showcased with this character and many point to the scene where she is removing her false eyelashes as proof of his technical skill.


Close up of the original production animation cel of Madame Medusa.


Close up of the Walt Disney seal and the production number.

When Madame Medusa is first introduced in the film "The Rescuers," she is barging into her back room of her pawn shop to answer a ringing telephone. "Madam Medusa's Pawn Shop Bou-tique," she says.  Geraldine Page, the Oscar winning actress, provided the voice to this wonderful villain and the way that she increases her voice tone with the words pawn shop boutique is just so fantastic and extremely memorable. This is a great eyes and mouth open image of Medusa; with her phone receiver pressed to her ear and her arm extended in an exaggerated post. A great addition to any animation art collection!

Original Production Animation Cel of the Pink Panther Signed by Friz Freleng and a Bull Cel from "Toro Pink," 1979


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cel of the Pink Panther signed by Friz Freleng and a Bull cel from "Toro Pink," 1979, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Production numbers left cel edges; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Pink Panther: 10 1/4 x 5", Bull: 4 1/2 x 5", Image 8 1/2 x 10"; Unframed.
DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cel of the Pink Panther signed by Friz Freleng without the background.


Close up of the production numbers.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.


Original production animation cel of a Bull without the background.


Close up of the production numbers. 

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

This is a wonderful multi-cel setup of the Pink Panther from "Toro Pink," 1979. The story of the short is that the Pink Panther is tricked, by the Bid Nose Guy, into a bullring in order to fight a bull. This is a very nice eyes open cel of the Pink Panther dressed as a matador with his red cape waving over his head. The cel is hand signed in ink by the famed animator/director Friz Freleng, and there is also a full figure cel of the bull. A beautiful piece of animation artwork perfect for any collection!

Sunday, February 26, 2017

Original Production Animation Cels and Matching Drawing of The Pink Panther and Man from "Pink Pull," 1979


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cels of the Pink Panther and Man from "Pink Pull," 1979, with effects cel from "Spark Plug Pink," 1979; Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Production numbers lower cel edges; Set on a lithographic background; With matching original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther in blue pencil with production numbers lower sheet edge; Size - Pink Panther & Man: 4 1/4 x 7", Image 9 1/4 x 11 1/4"; Unframed.

To purchase these cels and drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cels of the Pink Panther, Man, and special effects.


Original production animation cels of the Pink Panther and Man without the background.


Close up of the original production animation cels of the Pink Panther and Man.


Close up of the production numbers.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.


Original special effects cel.


Close up of the production numbers.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther.


Close up of the production numbers.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

This is a great pair of cels of the Pink Panther and a Man from "Pink Pull," 1979. The story of the short is that The Pink Panther, while walking on the street, drops a coin that falls down a sewer grate. He buys a strong magnet, attempting to use it to get the coin back, but unfortunately the magnet is so strong it pulls the watch from a man at a bus stop; and the whistle, badge, and uniform buttons from a policeman. After all the chaos, when the Panther finally returns to the sewer grate, another man pulls up the coin with his own magnet. In addition to the cels of the Panther and a Man; there is a special effects cel from "Spark Plug Pink," 1979, and the matching original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther. A beautiful piece of animation artwork perfect for any collection.

Original Production Animation Cels of Briar Rose And A Pair of Birds From "Sleeping Beauty," 1959


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cels of Briar Rose and two birds set on a lithographic background from "Sleeping Beauty," 1959, Walt Disney Studios; With original Art Corner Certificate sticker; Size - Briar Rose: 6 1/2 x 3 1/2", Each Bird: Approximately 1 x 1"; Image 10 x 8"; Mat 14 x 11"; Single matted.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Sleeping Beauty," the 1959 Walt Disney full length motion picture, introduced two characters that would become universal favorites; Maleficent and Princess Aurora. Aurora, along with Snow White and Cinderella would be forever immortalized in the public's view as the three greatest Disney Princesses. The original design for Aurora and her peasant disguise Briar Rose was developed by Tom Oreb, who based the character on the famed Hollywood actress Audrey Hepburn; known for her thin frame and a very graceful demeanor. Marc Davis, the head animator, would continue the development process by morphing her general appearance and the clothing of the heroine. The fine tuning of the character continued so that she could be combined with the very angular forms present in the Eyvind Earle hand painted backgrounds.

As with other Disney films, an actress was hired as a live-action model (as a guide for the animators) for Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Helene Stanley, who was also the model for Cinderella in 1950, became the model for the heroine. It is interesting to note that prior to marrying Marc Davis in 1956, Alice (Davis) designed some of costumes worn by Stanley in her acting role in "Sleeping Beauty."


Matted original production animation cels of Briar Rose and two birds.

In 1952, the professional opera singer Mary Costa, after meeting people at a party with her future husband director Frank Tashlin, auditioned for the part of Disney's Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Walt Disney called her personally within hours of the audition to inform her that the part was hers. The success of the film "Sleeping Beauty," owes a chuck of those accolades to the voice of Mary Costa. Her songs were some of the most beautiful ever sung by a Disney Princess. In November 1999 Mary Costa received the Disney Legends Award, and her hand prints are now a permanent part of the Disney Legends Plaza at the entrance to Walt Disney Studios.


Original Art Corner Certificate sticker.

After Maleficent's evil curse that Princess Aurora would (before the sun sets on her sixteenth birthday) prick her finger on the spindle of a spinning wheel and die; the three Good Fairies disguise Aurora as a peasant named Briar Rose and hide her deep in a remote forest cottage. The majority of the movie focuses on Briar Rose, and this is a beautiful original production drawing of her.

This is a beautiful full figure, eyes open cel of Briar Rose as she is dancing barefoot in the forest. In addition, there is a red and blue bird flying just above her head. A gorgeous setup from the last vintage full length feature animated Walt Disney film!

Saturday, February 25, 2017

Original Production Animation Cel of The Pink Panther From "Pink In The Woods," 1979


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cel of the Pink Panther from "Pink In The Woods," 1979, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Production numbers lower cel edge; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Pink Panther: 3 1/2 x 1 1/4", Image 7 3/4 x 12 1/4"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cel of the Pink Panther showing the entire cel.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.


Close up of the original production animation cel of the Pink Panther.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Close up of the production numbers.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

This is a fantastic cel of the Pink Panther from "Pink In The Woods," 1979. The story of the short is that The Pink Panther gets a job as a lumberjack, and trouble immediately begins when an axe blade flies off and cuts down the wrong tree; which in turn destroys the manager’s car. When the correct tree finally falls down, it destroys the lumber cabin; which makes the manager very angry. The Panther is given a chainsaw, which begins to chase him; however he manages to destroy it with a mallet. The Panther decides to employ a beaver to do all the woodcutting and the work gets done so fast that the manager awards the Panther with a big bonus. This is a great full figure, eyes open cel of Pink Panther and a wonderful addition to any animation art collection.

Original Production Animation Cel and Matching Drawing of The Pink Panther from "Dietetic Pink," 1978


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cel of the Pink Panther from "Dietetic Pink," 1978, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Production numbers lower cel edge; Set on a lithographic background; With matching original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther in blue pencil with production numbers lower sheet edge; Size - Pink Panther: 6 x 3 1/4", Image 8 1/2 x 11 3/4"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel and drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cel of the Pink Panther.


Original production animation cel of the Pink Panther showing the entire cel.


Close up of the original production animation cel of the Pink Panther.


Close up of the production numbers.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of the Pink Panther.


Close up of the production numbers.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

This is a fantastic cel of the Pink Panther from "Dietetic Pink," 1978. The story of the short is that The Pink Panther is on a mission to lose weight after seeing his incorrect weight on a broken scale. This is a full figure, eyes open cel of the Pink Panther jumping rope; and with the matching original production animation drawing. A beautiful piece of animation artwork.

Original Production Animation Cel of The Pink Panther from "Doctor Pink," 1979


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cel of the Pink Panther from "Doctor Pink," 1979, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Production numbers lower cel edge; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Pink Panther: 4 1/2 x 6 1/2", Image 9 1/2 x 12 1/4"; Unframed.

DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original animation cel of the Pink Panther showing the entire cel sheet.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.


Close up of the Pink Panther cel.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Close up of the production numbers.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

This is a wonderful cel of the Pink Panther from "Doctor Pink," 1979. The story of the short is that the Pink Panther gets a job as janitor in a hospital. He dreams of becoming a doctor, but causes nothing but trouble in the hospital. He ruins an x-ray photograph and makes a doctor slip on the newly-waxed floor. This is a great full figure, eyes open cel of the Pink Panther; and is a beautiful piece of animation artwork.