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Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Original Production Animation Drawing of Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse from "Mickey's Gala Premiere," 1933


Original production animation drawing of Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse from "Mickey's Gala Premiere," 1933, Walt Disney Studios; Graphite pencil on peg hole paper; Numbered 5 lower right; Size - Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse: 3 3/4 x 6", Sheet 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.

"Mickey's Gala Premiere" (released on July 1, 1933) is a black and white animated short film produced by Walt Disney Productions and it was directed by Burt Gillett. Walt Disney provided the voice of Mickey Mouse and the music was composed by Frank Churchill.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Mickey and Minnie Mouse.

The story of "Mickey's Gala Premiere" is that Mickey's newest film is having an opening, and all the stars turn out at Grauman's Chinese Theater. There are an enormous number of celebrities that are depicting in this short, and include in order of appearance: The Keystone Kops (Ben Turpin, Ford Sterling, Mack Swain, Harry Langdon, and Chester Conklin), Wallace Beery, Marie Dressler, Lionel Barrymore, John Barrymore, Ethel Barrymore, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, The Marx Brothers, Maurice Chevalier, Eddie Cantor, Jimmy Durante, Jean Harlow, Joan Crawford, Janet Gaynor, Harold Lloyd, Edward G. Robinson, Clark Gable, Adolphe Menjou, Sid Grauman, George Arliss, Joe E. Brown, Charles Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Mae West, Jack Oakie, Helen Hayes, William Powell, Cheser Morris, Gloria Swanson, Will Hayes, Greta Garbo, Will Rogers, Ed Wynn, Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey, Bela Lugosi, Fredric March, Boris Karloff, and Douglas Fairbanks. The Gala Premiere is for the film "Galloping Romance," and the story is that Peg-Leg Pete kidnaps Minnie Mouse, and Mickey Mouse rides to her rescue on a variety of animals. The crowd in the theater sway to the music and roll in the aisles with laughter. After everyone comes onto stage to congratulate Mickey, Gretta Garbo kisses him. At this point Mickey wakes up from his dream, as Pluto is licking him on his face.

"Mickey's Gala Premiere" was the last show that was broadcast on BBC television on September 1, 1939, two days before the United Kingdom declared war on Germany. It was thought that the VHF signal from the broadcast could be used as a homing beacon for the enemy planes that were closing in on London. This cartoon was also the first thing that was broadcast when BBC television resumed broadcasting on June 7, 1946. The announcer, Jasmine Bligh, introduced the short by saying "Now then, as we were saying before we were so rudely interrupted."


Close up of the production number.

This is a great drawing of both Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse as they emerge from their limousine at the entrance of the Gala. Minnie is dressed in a long coat and wearing high heels, and Mickey is wearing a tuxedo coat with tails and is tipping his top hat to the crowd. Mickey is also holding Pluto's leash (Pluto's body would have been drawn on a separate sheet of animation paper) that is attached to his collar. The drawing is centered on the sheet and it is rendered in graphite pencil on peg hole animation paper. This is a perfect image of Mickey and Minnie Mouse, and certainly a great animation drawing from an early Walt Disney black and white cartoon short of the 1930's.

Original Production Animation Cel of Winnie The Pooh and Rabbit from "Winnie The Pooh and The Honey Tree," 1966


Original hand painted production animation cel of Winnie The Pooh and Rabbit from "Winnie The Pooh and The Honey Tree," 1966; Numbered 73 in ink lower right; Walt Disney Studios; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Winnie The Pooh & Rabbit: 5 1/2 x 6", Image 10 x 15 1/4"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE! 

"And then one morning, when Rabbit began to wonder if Pooh might be stuck there forever, a miraculous thing happened. He budged!" -Narrator

"The Many Adventures of Winnie The Pooh," 1977 was composed of a series of featurettes Disney produced based upon the Winnie-the-Pooh books by A. A. Milne. Walt Disney wanted to introduce the public to the Pooh characters slowly over time and the released featurettes include, "Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree," 1966, "Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day." 1968, and "Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too," 1974. For the full length film in 1977, extra material was added and used to link the three featurettes together. A fourth, shorter featurette was added at the end of the film and was based on the final chapter of "The House at Pooh Corner."


Original production animation cel of Rabbit and Winnie The Pooh.

Wolfgang Reitherman began working for Walt Disney in 1934, along with future Disney legends Ward Kimball and Milt Kahl. The three worked together on a number of early classic Disney shorts and Reitherman worked on Disney feature films produced from 1937 to 1981, including "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (animating the Slave in the Magic Mirror) up to "The Fox and the Hound," where he served as the co-producer for the film. Beginning with 1961's "One Hundred and One Dalmatians," "Woolie" (as he was called by friends) served as Disney's chief animation director.

One of Reitherman's productions, the 1968 short "Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day," won the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film. In addition, all three of Reitherman's sons — Bruce, Richard, and Robert provided voices for Disney characters. Bruce Reitherman was the voice for Christopher Robin in "Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree."


Close up of the production number.

"Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree," 1966 is a film that combined live-action and hand painted cel animation. It was released by The Walt Disney Company, directed by Wolfgang Reitherman, and was based on the first two chapters of the book "Winnie-the-Pooh" by A. A. Milne. This was the only Winnie the Pooh production to be released under the supervision of Walt Disney before his death on December 15, 1966. Music and lyrics were written by the Sherman Brothers (Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman); with background music provided by Buddy Baker. The American actor Sterling Holloway provided the voice of Winnie The Pooh.

This cel is from the scene,when the Silly Old Bear visits Rabbit at his house, and is invited inside for lunch. This proves to be a huge mistake for Rabbit, because Pooh eats all of Rabbit's honey. Realizing that there is no more food to eat; Pooh tries to exit, but becomes stuck in Rabbit's hole. After a while the narrator says, "And then one morning, when Rabbit began to wonder if Pooh might be stuck there forever, a miraculous thing happened. He budged!" Rabbit exclaims, "Today's the day!" Christopher Robin, Kanga, and Eeyore pull and tug Pooh from the outside of the hole, and with Rabbit pushing him from the inside; they all chant "Heave-ho! Heave-ho!"

Rabbit was animated by the great Don Bluth and was voiced by Junius Matthews; a veteran radio actor who also voiced the owl Archimedes in the Disney film "The Sword In The Stone," 1963. This is a spectacular cel of Rabbit and Winnie The Pooh, who is stuck in Rabbit's hole. This is one of the greatest scenes in all of the Pooh Disney shorts, and one of the greatest Disney scenes of all time! An absolutely beautiful piece of animation art, that is perfect for any art collection!

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Original Production Animation Drawing of Cinderella Dancing with Prince Charming From "Cinderella," 1950


Original production animation drawing of Cinderella dancing with Prince Charming in red, blue, and graphite pencils from "Cinderella," 1950, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 157 in pencil lower right; Size - Cinderella & Prince Charming 6 1/2 x 6", Sheet 12 1/2 x 15 1/2"; Unframed.


The 1950 Walt Disney feature film "Cinderella" was based on the French version of the tale by Charles Perrault, entitled "Cinderella" and written in 1698. The film was the second in the series of great Princess films developed by Disney, the first being Snow White in 1937. The character of Cinderella is usually front and center in the pantheon of Disney Princess merchandise, perhaps because she is the only Princess not to be of a noble blood line who ended up marrying a Prince and becoming royalty.

Cinderella was animated by both Marc Davis and Eric Larson, however the two animators had different perceptions of the character, with Davis preferring elegance and Larson opting for simplicity. This actually worked in the film's favor, resulting in Cinderella being a much more complicated character than her predecessor Snow White. As with other Disney films, the studio hired actress Helene Stanley to perform the live-action reference for Cinderella. She would later return to the studio for the characters of Aurora in "Sleeping Beauty," 1959 and Anita Radcliffe in "One Hundred and One Dalmatians," 1961.


Close up of the Cinderella and Prince Charming production drawing.

According to Christopher Finch, from his book "The Art of Walt Disney":
"Disney insisted that all scenes involving human characters should be shot first in live-action to determine that they would work before the expensive business of animation was permitted to start. The animators did not like this way of working, feeling it detracted from their ability to create character. The animators understood the necessity for this approach and in retrospect acknowledged that Disney had handled things with considerable subtlety."

About 400 women and girls auditioned for the voice role of Cinderella, but the role ended up going to Ilene Woods. Woods, who at the time worked on the radio and did not know anything about the audition, was asked one day by her colleagues Mack David and Jerry Livingston to sing a song from Cinderella. Without her knowledge, her recording was given by her friends to Disney Studios. After listening to the material Walt Disney immediately decided that he had found the voice with which to speak and sing the character of Cinderella and contacted Ilene.


Close up of the production number.

Prince Charming was animated by Eric Larson, who according to Andreas Deja "Confessed to some of us newcomers that he felt kind of embarrassed about the stiffness in his performance." The Prince was voiced by William Phipps, and after Phipps's initial audition; the studio was so impressed with his performance that Walt Disney himself offered him the role. William Phipps is perhaps best known for his roles in dozens of classic sci-fi and westerns, both in films and on television. It is a little known fact that Mike Douglas (yes of "The Mike Douglas Show") provided the singing voice for Prince Charming for the song "So This Is Love,"as the Prince and Cinderella danced together at the Grand Ball.

A bit of trivia, not only is the name of the Prince never revealed, he is never actually referred to as "Prince Charming" in "Cinderella." His name was mentioned only in merchandise and, more recently in the various films and TV appearances of the character. Prince Charming was the first Disney Prince to participate in a duet with his respective love interest, the first Prince to be featured in a wedding celebration, and the first to  dance with his heroine just after they met.

It does not get any better than this; an original production animation drawing of Cinderella dancing with Prince Charming for the first time at the Grand Ball! Both Cinderella and Prince Charming are full figure and Cinderella's eyes are open. An absolutely beautiful drawing, from the most loved scenes in the entire film. The veteran Walt Disney animator Marc Davis supervised the animation of this scene.

Original Production Animation Drawing of Mickey Mouse from "Mickey Plays Papa," 1934


Original production animation drawing of Mickey Mouse from "Mickey Plays Papa," 1934, Walt Disney Studios; Graphite pencil on peg hole paper; Numbered 127 lower right; Size - Mickey Mouse: 4 x 4", Sheet 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.

 To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Mickey Plays Papa" (released on September 29, 1934) is a black and white animated short film produced by Walt Disney Productions and it was directed by Burt Gillett. Walt Disney provides the voice of Mickey Mouse and the music was composed by Bert Lewis.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Mickey Mouse.

The story of "Mickey Plays Papa" begins as Mickey Mouse is reading a frightening story "The Cry in the Night" to his dog Pluto. Outside of their home, a hooded figure approaches and leaves a basket containing a crying baby with a note that reads: "Please give little Elmer a good home. He ain't much trouble." As soon as Mickey and Pluto discover baby Elmer, the remaining story revolves around the pair trying to entertain Elmer and stop him from crying. Mickey does an impression of the silent film star Charlie Chaplin, while Pluto gives the baby a bone and performs tricks. Despite their valiant efforts, nothing seems to calm the child. Mickey tries to remove the rubber nipple from Elmer's bottle, but during the process he is left him with a stretched out nose. Mickey then succeeds by doing an imitation of the big-nosed film star Jimmy Durante, much to Elmer's delight.


Close up of the production number.

This is a great drawing of Mickey Mouse; he is full figure, eyes and mouth open, and he is an impressive four inches tall. The drawing is centered on the sheet and it is rendered in graphite pencil on peg hole animation paper. This is a wonderful image of Mickey Mouse, and certainly a great animation drawing from an early Walt Disney black and white cartoon short of the 1930's.

Original Production Animation Drawing of Snow White from "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," 1937


Original production animation drawing of Snow White from "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," 1937, Walt Disney Studios; Red, blue, and graphite pencils on peg hole paper; Production numbers stamp lower left; Numbered 18 in red pencil lower right; Size - Snow White: 6 x 7 1/2", Sheet 10 x 12"; Unframed.


“Lips red as the rose. Hair black as ebony. Skin white as snow.”
―The Magic Mirror describing Snow White

Development on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs began in early 1934, and by June Walt Disney announced to The New York Times the production of his first feature, to be released under Walt Disney Productions. Before Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the Disney studio had been primarily involved in the production of animated short subjects in the Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphonies series. However, Disney hoped to expand his studio's prestige and revenues by moving into features, and he estimated that Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs could be produced for a budget of $250,000 (this was ten times the budget of an average Silly Symphony).

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was to be the first full-length cel animated feature in motion picture history, and as such Walt Disney had to fight to get the film produced. Both his brother and business partner Roy Disney, as well as his wife Lillian attempted to talk him out of it.  The Hollywood movie industry mockingly referred to the film, while is was in production, as "Disney's Folly."  Disney ended up having to mortgage his house to help finance the film's production, which would eventually ran up to a total cost of $1,488,422.74; an absolutely massive sum for a feature film in 1937!


Close up of the Snow White production drawing.

A large number of actresses auditioned for the voice of Snow White. Walt Disney listened to each audition in his office while the actress performed in another room, without any knowledge of the actress' appearance or reputation. This would insure that he would only judge based on the sound of the voice. According to later accounts, most of the voices Disney felt, did not sound young enough. Eventually, in September of 1935, Adriana Caselotti was chosen for the voice of Snow White. Caselotti was eighteen at the time and made her coloraturo soprano sound younger, knowing that the character was intended to be 14 years old. In recording sessions Caselotti found difficulty in the line, "Grumpy, I didn't know you cared"; instead of "didn't", Caselotti was only able to say "din". After rehearsing the line many times, Walt Disney eventually said "Oh, the heck with..." and "din'" remained in the final film.


Close up of the production stamp.

Snow White's design was supervised by Grim Natwick, an animator who had previously developed and worked on Betty Boop at Fleischer Studios. It is interesting to note that early designs for the Snow White resemble Betty Boop, and some appear to be caricatures of famous actresses of the time. As development continued, Snow White became more and more lifelike. Another animator, Hamilton Luske's first designs for Snow White depicted her as a slightly awkward, gangly teenager. However, Walt Disney had a different idea in mind; he wanted Snow White to be older, and more realistic-looking. This was achieved by the use of live-action references for the animators. Also, in order for Snow White to better relate onscreen to the seven Dwarfs, it was decided that her head be slightly larger than normal. In addition, the women in the animation studio's ink and paint department felt that Snow White's black hair was too unnatural and harsh, so they drybrushed whisps of light grey over the top of each and every cel.


Close up of the production number.

This particular drawing is from the "With A Smile and A Song" song sequence which occurs in a forest clearing. Snow White runs into the forest, after the Huntsman is unable to kill her as demanded by the Evil Queen. The sequence is one of the most beautiful in the film, and the song (music written by Frank Churchill with lyrics by Larry Morey) has become a staple of Pop culture. Snow White runs through the forest and collapses in a clearing. She is awakened by animals and begins to sing "With A Smile and A Song." This drawing was used at the beginning of the song and is an extremely detailed drawing of Snow White; perfect for any animation art collection!

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Original Production Animation Drawing of Snow White and a Bird from "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," 1937


Original production animation drawing of Snow White and a Bird from "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," 1937, Walt Disney Studios; Red, blue, green, and graphite pencils on peg hole paper; Numbered 112 in graphite pencil lower right; Production stamp lower left; Size - Snow White & Bird: 6 x 2 1/2", Sheet 10 x 12"; Unframed.


“Lips red as the rose. Hair black as ebony. Skin white as snow.”
―The Magic Mirror describing Snow White

Development on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs began in early 1934, and by June Walt Disney announced to The New York Times the production of his first feature, to be released under Walt Disney Productions. Before Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the Disney studio had been primarily involved in the production of animated short subjects in the Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphonies series. However, Disney hoped to expand his studio's prestige and revenues by moving into features, and he estimated that Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs could be produced for a budget of $250,000 (this was ten times the budget of an average Silly Symphony).

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was to be the first full-length cel animated feature in motion picture history, and as such Walt Disney had to fight to get the film produced. Both his brother and business partner Roy Disney, as well as his wife Lillian attempted to talk him out of it.  The Hollywood movie industry mockingly referred to the film, while is was in production, as "Disney's Folly."  Disney ended up having to mortgage his house to help finance the film's production, which would eventually ran up to a total cost of $1,488,422.74; an absolutely massive sum for a feature film in 1937!


Close up of the Snow White production drawing.

A large number of actresses auditioned for the voice of Snow White. Walt Disney listened to each audition in his office while the actress performed in another room, without any knowledge of the actress' appearance or reputation. This would insure that he would only judge based on the sound of the voice. According to later accounts, most of the voices Disney felt, did not sound young enough. Eventually, in September of 1935, Adriana Caselotti was chosen for the voice of Snow White. Caselotti was eighteen at the time and made her coloraturo soprano sound younger, knowing that the character was intended to be 14 years old. In recording sessions Caselotti found difficulty in the line, "Grumpy, I didn't know you cared"; instead of "didn't", Caselotti was only able to say "din". After rehearsing the line many times, Walt Disney eventually said "Oh, the heck with..." and "din'" remained in the final film.


Close up of the production stamp.

Snow White's design was supervised by Grim Natwick, an animator who had previously developed and worked on Betty Boop at Fleischer Studios. It is interesting to note that early designs for the Snow White resemble Betty Boop, and some appear to be caricatures of famous actresses of the time. As development continued, Snow White became more and more lifelike. Another animator, Hamilton Luske's first designs for Snow White depicted her as a slightly awkward, gangly teenager. However, Walt Disney had a different idea in mind; he wanted Snow White to be older, and more realistic-looking. This was achieved by the use of live-action references for the animators. Also, in order for Snow White to better relate onscreen to the seven Dwarfs, it was decided that her head be slightly larger than normal. In addition, the women in the animation studio's ink and paint department felt that Snow White's black hair was too unnatural and harsh, so they drybrushed whisps of light grey over the top of each and every cel.


Close up of the production number.

This particular drawing is from the "Whistle While You Work" song sequence which occurs at the Dwarf cottage. Snow White and her animal friends begin to clean up the Dwarf's home while she his singing. The sequence is one of the most beautiful in the film, and the song (music written by Frank Churchill with lyrics by Larry Morey) has become a staple of Pop culture. This drawing was used at the end of the song and is an extremely detailed drawing of Snow White singing to a small blue bird resting on her right index finger. An absolutely spectacular drawing, perfect for any animation art collection!

Original Production Animation Cel of Edgar and Napoleon from "The Aristocats," 1970

Original hand painted production animation cel of Edgar and Napoleon from "The Aristocats," 1970, Walt Disney Studios; Set on a lithographic background; Numbered 44 in ink lower right; Size - Edgar: 9 1/4 x 7", Napoleon: 7 1/2 x 6 1/4", Image: 10 x 14 3/4"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Nice doggy, nice doggy. Heel, roll over, play dead!" - Edgar

"The Aristocats," 1970 is an animated feature film produced and released by Walt Disney Productions.  This was the last film project to be approved by Walt Disney himself, as he died in late 1966, before the film was finally released to theaters by Buena Vista Distribution on December 11, 1970. "The Aristocats" featured the voice talent of Eva Gabor, Hermione Baddeley, Phil Harris, Dean Clark, Sterling Holloway, Scatman Crothers, and Roddy Maude-Roxby.

The film is based on a story by Tom McGowan and Tom Rowe, and centers around a family of aristocratic cats. After the mistress's butler kidnaps them (to gain his mistress' fortune which was intended to go to the cats) an unlikely alley cat acquaintance helps them escape and be returned to their home.  

It is Paris 1910 and Madame Bonfamille tells her lawyer Georges Hautecourt that she has decided to leave all of her stocks, bonds, mansion, treasures, jewels, and her entire fortune to her beloved cats rather than to her butler, Edgar Balthazar.  When Edgar overhears this he fears the cats will outlive him, and that he will never see a penny of the inheritance.  He then realizes that he has to get rid of the cats; "I'll be gone, no oh no... they'll be gone," he says.  Edgar decides to put sleeping tablets into the cats milk and when they fall asleep, he takes them in a covered basket on his motorcycle far away from the city of Paris. 


Original production animation cel of Edgar and Napoleon without the background. 

The two dogs Napoleon a Bloodhound and Lafayette a Bassett Hound, were both animated by Frank Thomas. The dogs were initially going to be in only one scene, but because it was so successful; a second scene was developed involving Edgar returning to the French countryside in order to collect his umbrella and bowler hat. Napoleon and Lafayette were voiced by Pat Buttram and George Lindsey, respectively. The two voice actors would later reunite in "Robin Hood" to provide the voices for the Sheriff of Nottingham and Trigger the vulture guard; and again in "The Rescuers" as Luke and Deadeye.


Close up of the production number.

The character of Edgar was voiced by Roddy Maude-Roxby, an accomplished English actor. He was just wonderful in the role with the delightful snooty English butler voice, that could also morph into a scheming cunning timber perfect for a Disney Villain.
This cel of Edgar and Napoleon appears in the scene when Edgar first makes his appearance at their abandoned windmill site in the French countryside, in order to dispose of Duchess and her kittens. A hilarious chase scene occurs between the two dogs and Edgar riding his motorcycle with attached sidecar. This is a large, rare, and wonderful cel of an eyes and mouths open image of both Edgar and Napoleon. Edgar is standing on the handle bars of his motorcycle, trying to avoid being bitten by Napoleon; who is riding in the sidecar. A great addition to any animation art collection!

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Original Production Animation Drawing of Mickey Mouse from "The Worm Turns," 1937


Original production animation drawing of Mickey Mouse from "The Worm Turns," 1937, Walt Disney Studios; Graphite, blue, and red pencils on peg hole paper; Numbered 59 in graphite pencil lower right; Size - Mickey Mouse: 4 3/4 x 4", Sheet 10 x 12"; Unframed.

 To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"The Worm Turns" (released on January 2, 1937) is an animated short film produced by Walt Disney Productions and was directed by Ben Sharpsteen. Both the title and the opening title card reference and show a worm attacking a bird; however neither animal appears in the short. The music was Franz von Suppe's most notable work, "Leichte Kavallerie (Light Cavalry)." Walt Disney provides the voice of Mickey Mouse, Pinto Colvig the voice of Pluto, and Billy Bletcher the voice of Pete the Dogcatcher.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Mickey Mouse.

The story of "The Worm Turns" is that Mickey Mouse is in his laboratory, and he mixes a "Courage Builder" potion that he found in an ancient formulas book. He puts the potion into a syringe and tries it out on a fly, that had been captured in the web of a spider. Once the formula is sprayed from a syringe, the fly gains enormous courage; and is able to escape the web and also attack the spider. Seeing that they potion worked, Mickey spots a mouse being chased by a cat. H sprays the mouse, who ends up charging the cat and throwing him out of a window. The cat lands on Mickey's dog Pluto's water bowl. Pluto begins to chase the cat, but Mickey sprays the "Courage Builder" on the cat which causes the cat to now chase Pluto. Pluto escapes, but the Pete  the dogcatcher catches Pluto in a dog net. Pluto escapes, but Pete grabs a shotgun and begins to chase Pluto down the street. Mickey sees the chase, and puts a large dose of the "Courage Builder" formula into a pest sprayer and sprays Pluto. Pluto charges Pete, bites him in the butt, and hurls him into the back of his own Dog Pound Truck; which crashes over the side of a hill. The last scene shows Pluto sniffing a fire hydrant, that Mickey sprays, causing the hydrant to spray Pluto with water. In each case, the weaker character that is sprayed with the potion, gets the upper hand on the stronger opponent.


Close up of the production number.

This is a great drawing of Mickey Mouse wearing his protective lab coat, rubber gloves, and holding the syringe containing the "Courage Builder" formula. He is full figure, eyes and mouth open, and he stands over four inches tall. The drawing is rendered in graphite, blue, and red pencils on peg hole animation paper. This is a wonderful image of Mickey Mouse and certainly a great drawing from one of the Walt Disney cartoon shorts of the 1930's.

Original Production Animation Drawing of Mickey Mouse from "The Worm Turns," 1937


Original production animation drawing of Mickey Mouse from "The Worm Turns," 1937, Walt Disney Studios; Graphite, blue, orange, and red pencils on peg hole paper; Numbered 508 in graphite pencil lower right and animation ladder right sheet edge; Size - Mickey Mouse: 4 x 5", Sheet 10 x 12"; Unframed.

 To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"The Worm Turns" (released on January 2, 1937) is an animated short film produced by Walt Disney Productions and was directed by Ben Sharpsteen. Both the title and the opening title card reference and show a worm attacking a bird; however neither animal appears in the short. The music was Franz von Suppe's most notable work, "Leichte Kavallerie (Light Cavalry)." Walt Disney provides the voice of Mickey Mouse, Pinto Colvig the voice of Pluto, and Billy Bletcher the voice of Pete the Dogcatcher.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Mickey Mouse.

The story of "The Worm Turns" is that Mickey Mouse is in his laboratory, and he mixes a "Courage Builder" potion that he found in an ancient formulas book. He puts the potion into a syringe and tries it out on a fly, that had been captured in the web of a spider. Once the formula is sprayed from a syringe, the fly gains enormous courage; and is able to escape the web and also attack the spider. Seeing that they potion worked, Mickey spots a mouse being chased by a cat. H sprays the mouse, who ends up charging the cat and throwing him out of a window. The cat lands on Mickey's dog Pluto's water bowl. Pluto begins to chase the cat, but Mickey sprays the "Courage Builder" on the cat which causes the cat to now chase Pluto. Pluto escapes, but the Pete  the dogcatcher catches Pluto in a dog net. Pluto escapes, but Pete grabs a shotgun and begins to chase Pluto down the street. Mickey sees the chase, and puts a large dose of the "Courage Builder" formula into a pest sprayer and sprays Pluto. Pluto charges Pete, bites him in the butt, and hurls him into the back of his own Dog Pound Truck; which crashes over the side of a hill. The last scene shows Pluto sniffing a fire hydrant, that Mickey sprays, causing the hydrant to spray Pluto with water. In each case, the weaker character that is sprayed with the potion, gets the upper hand on the stronger opponent.


Close up of the production number.

This is a great drawing of Mickey Mouse wearing his protective lab coat, rubber gloves, and holding the syringe containing the "Courage Builder" formula. He is eyes and mouth open, and this is a large portrait image. The drawing is rendered in graphite, blue, orange, and red pencils on peg hole animation paper. In addition to being a great image, this is a rare multi-colored shaded, color call out drawing; that indicates to the Walt Disney Ink and Paint Department which paint colors are to be used for each section of the character. The numbers represent different paint colors and the lines indicate which parts of the image are to receive that specific color. This is a wonderful image of Mickey Mouse and certainly a great drawing from one of the Walt Disney cartoon shorts of the 1930's.

Original Production Animation Drawing of Mickey Mouse from "The Worm Turns," 1937


Original production animation drawing of Mickey Mouse from "The Worm Turns," 1937, Walt Disney Studios; Graphite, green, blue, orange, yellow, purple, and red pencils on peg hole paper; Production numbers lower sheet edge; Size - Mickey Mouse: 4 3/4 x 3 1/2", Sheet 10 x 12"; Unframed.

 To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"The Worm Turns" (released on January 2, 1937) is an animated short film produced by Walt Disney Productions and was directed by Ben Sharpsteen. Both the title and the opening title card reference and show a worm attacking a bird; however neither animal appears in the short. The music was Franz von Suppe's most notable work, "Leichte Kavallerie (Light Cavalry)." Walt Disney provides the voice of Mickey Mouse, Pinto Colvig the voice of Pluto, and Billy Bletcher the voice of Pete the Dogcatcher.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Mickey Mouse.

The story of "The Worm Turns" is that Mickey Mouse is in his laboratory, and he mixes a "Courage Builder" potion that he found in an ancient formulas book. He puts the potion into a syringe and tries it out on a fly, that had been captured in the web of a spider. Once the formula is sprayed from a syringe, the fly gains enormous courage; and is able to escape the web and also attack the spider. Seeing that they potion worked, Mickey spots a mouse being chased by a cat. H sprays the mouse, who ends up charging the cat and throwing him out of a window. The cat lands on Mickey's dog Pluto's water bowl. Pluto begins to chase the cat, but Mickey sprays the "Courage Builder" on the cat which causes the cat to now chase Pluto. Pluto escapes, but the Pete  the dogcatcher catches Pluto in a dog net. Pluto escapes, but Pete grabs a shotgun and begins to chase Pluto down the street. Mickey sees the chase, and puts a large dose of the "Courage Builder" formula into a pest sprayer and sprays Pluto. Pluto charges Pete, bites him in the butt, and hurls him into the back of his own Dog Pound Truck; which crashes over the side of a hill. The last scene shows Pluto sniffing a fire hydrant, that Mickey sprays, causing the hydrant to spray Pluto with water. In each case, the weaker character that is sprayed with the potion, gets the upper hand on the stronger opponent.


Close up of the production numbers.

This is a great drawing of Mickey Mouse wearing his protective lab coat, rubber gloves, and holding the syringe containing the "Courage Builder" formula. He is full figure, his eyes are open, and he is smiling. The drawing is rendered in graphite, green, blue, orange, yellow, purple, and red pencils on peg hole animation paper. In addition to being a great image, this is a rare multi-colored shaded, color call out drawing; that indicates to the Walt Disney Ink and Paint Department which paint colors are to be used for each section of the character. The numbers represent different paint colors and the lines indicate which parts of the image are to receive that specific color. This is a wonderful image of Mickey Mouse and certainly a great drawing from one of the Walt Disney cartoon shorts of the 1930's.