Translate

Sunday, December 31, 2017

Original Production Animation Drawing of Captain Hook from "Peter Pan," 1953


Original production animation drawing of Captain Hook in red, green, and graphite pencils from "Peter Pan," 1953, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 71 in pencil lower right with production numbers stamp lower left; Size - Captain Hook 6 1/4 x 4 3/4", Sheet 12 1/2 x 15 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Ha ha ha, you wouldn’t dare fight old Hook man to man. You’d fly away like a cowardly sparrow." -  Captain Hook

The author J. M. Barrie first used Peter Pan as a character in a section of the adult novel "The Little White Bird" in 1902. He returned to that character with his stage play entitled "Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up," which premiered in London on December 27, 1904. The play ran until 1913, and it was later adapted by Walt Disney for the animated feature film entitled, "Peter Pan," in 1953.

Captain Hook was initially designed by Milt Kahl animated by legendary Frank Thomas and Wolfgang Reitherman. Hook voiced by Hans Conried who was also the voice of George Darling, which is consistent with the roles of "Peter Pan" for the stage. Conried was a well known actor including roles on "I Love Lucy" where he played an English tutor as well as playing the character Wrongway Feldman on "Gilligan's Island." His voice was so distinctive and so memorable that he was perfect for the role of Captain Hook; as he had a wonderful way of conveying both the rough gruff pirate role as well and the sly calculating villain.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Captain Hook.

From Disney animator Andreas Deja:
Many of you would agree that Captain Hook is one of Frank Thomas' best creations. To some Frank is the best animator who ever lived. - He used live action reference for a number of his characters. In this case it was character actor Hans Conried who provided the voice and acting reference for Hook. Frank was very critical about the way other animators used live action. To him the acting ideas were all you needed, but you still had to pass judgement on the footage and interpret what the actor gave you. His animation never has that roto, floaty feel to it. For one thing Frank was way too talented and smart to let that happen."


Close up of the production number.


Close up of the production number stamp.

Frank Thomas's first sketches of Captain Hook were much more menacing than the final product. Walt Disney felt the character was going to be too frightening for children and so Thomas toned down his drawings. The result is a wonderful character and certainly one the fan favorite male villains in the Walt Disney film world.

This is a fantastic production drawing from the final battle between Captain Hook and Peter Pan aboard the pirate's ship "Jolly Roger." Hook has both eyes and mouth open, and has a wickedly evil smile. He is armed with his sword and hook, as he pursues Peter Pan onto the rope ladder rigging of the ship; daring Peter to face him. As Hook climbs up the rope ladder he says to Peter Pan, "Ha ha ha, you wouldn’t dare fight old Hook man to man. You’d fly away like a cowardly sparrow." A beautiful drawing of one of the greatest Disney Villains and a great addition to any animation art collection!

Original Production Animation Cel of Cruella De Vil from "One Hundred and One Dalmatians," 1961


Original hand painted production animation cel of Cruella De Vil from "One Hundred and One Dalmatians," 1961, Walt Disney Studios; Set on a lithographic background; Numbered 69 in ink lower right; Size - Cruella De Vil: 8 1/2" x 4 1/4", Image 11 1/2" x 14 1/2"; Unframed.


"Cruella De Vil, Cruella De Vil, if she doesn't scare you; no evil thing will."- Roger

"One Hundred and One Dalmatians" ("101 Dalmatians"), is a 1961 full length animated feature film by Walt Disney Productions. It was adapted from Dodie Smith's 1956 novel of the same name. It stars Rod Taylor as the voice of Pongo and Cate Bauer as the voice of Perdita; with Betty Lou Gerson as the voice of the evil and villainous Cruella de Vil. The animation of all the characters from the film was quite extraordinary.

The film "Sleeping Beauty," 1959 was very expensive to make and it took a huge financial loss at the box-office; as a result, the Disney animation studio was considering closing. During the production of "Sleeping Beauty," Walt Disney told animator Eric Larson: "I don't think we can continue, it's too expensive." Because Disney's entire company was based on animation, he was looking for a way to continue with animation, and at the same time significantly reduce costs.

The animator Ub Iwerks had been experimenting with Xerox photography to aid in animation process. By 1959 he had modified a Xerox camera to transfer the drawings by the animators, directly onto animation cels. The process would preserve the spontaneity of the penciled drawings but eliminate the inking process, thus saving time and money. However, the limitation was that the camera was unable to deviate from a black scratchy outline, and the resulting cels lacked the fine lavish quality of hand inking.

Cruella along with Maleficent are two of the most favorite of all the Disney villains, and they were both animated by Marc Davis. The character of Cruella De Vil was created by Dodie Smith for his novel "101 Dalmatians" in 1956, but it was Davis's visual interpretation that the world remembers. Although some of Cruella's traits were based in the novel, Davis along with Bill Peat, morphed the character by making her razor thin and exaggerating her oversized coat onto her thin frame. The long cigarette holder was modeled on one Davis used himself. Inspiration was also drawn from Hollywood legends Tallulah Bankhead, Bette Davis, and Rosalind Russell. Movement, according to Davis, was consistent "like someone you wouldn't like," and another inspiration was based on "one woman I knew who was just a monster. She was tall and thin and talked constantly - you never knew what she was saying, but you couldn't get a word in edgewise."

The voice of Cruella was provided by Betty Lou Gerson. She had worked for Disney prior as the narrator for Cinderella, but her voice talent as Cruella De Vil is her tour de force! The highly pitched phrase "Anita Darling!" is completely iconic and has become part of Disney pop culture.


Close up of the Cruella De Vil production animation cel.

This is wonderful original production animation cel of Cruella De Vil. She is eyes open, with an evil smile, and she is wearing her classic mink coat and carrying her cigarette with holder. A great addition to any Disney Villain or animation art collection!

Original Production Animation Cel of Cruella De Vil from "One Hundred and One Dalmatians," 1961


Original hand painted production animation cel of Cruella De Vil from "One Hundred and One Dalmatians," 1961, Walt Disney Studios; Set on a lithographic background; Numbered 69 in ink lower right; Size - Cruella De Vil: 8 1/2" x 4 1/4", Image 11 1/2" x 14 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Cruella De Vil, Cruella De Vil, if she doesn't scare you; no evil thing will."- Roger

"One Hundred and One Dalmatians" ("101 Dalmatians"), is a 1961 full length animated feature film by Walt Disney Productions. It was adapted from Dodie Smith's 1956 novel of the same name. It stars Rod Taylor as the voice of Pongo and Cate Bauer as the voice of Perdita; with Betty Lou Gerson as the voice of the evil and villainous Cruella de Vil. The animation of all the characters from the film was quite extraordinary.

The film "Sleeping Beauty," 1959 was very expensive to make and it took a huge financial loss at the box-office; as a result, the Disney animation studio was considering closing. During the production of "Sleeping Beauty," Walt Disney told animator Eric Larson: "I don't think we can continue, it's too expensive." Because Disney's entire company was based on animation, he was looking for a way to continue with animation, and at the same time significantly reduce costs.

The animator Ub Iwerks had been experimenting with Xerox photography to aid in animation process. By 1959 he had modified a Xerox camera to transfer the drawings by the animators, directly onto animation cels. The process would preserve the spontaneity of the penciled drawings but eliminate the inking process, thus saving time and money. However, the limitation was that the camera was unable to deviate from a black scratchy outline, and the resulting cels lacked the fine lavish quality of hand inking.

Cruella along with Maleficent are two of the most favorite of all the Disney villains, and they were both animated by Marc Davis. The character of Cruella De Vil was created by Dodie Smith for his novel "101 Dalmatians" in 1956, but it was Davis's visual interpretation that the world remembers. Although some of Cruella's traits were based in the novel, Davis along with Bill Peat, morphed the character by making her razor thin and exaggerating her oversized coat onto her thin frame. The long cigarette holder was modeled on one Davis used himself. Inspiration was also drawn from Hollywood legends Tallulah Bankhead, Bette Davis, and Rosalind Russell. Movement, according to Davis, was consistent "like someone you wouldn't like," and another inspiration was based on "one woman I knew who was just a monster. She was tall and thin and talked constantly - you never knew what she was saying, but you couldn't get a word in edgewise."

The voice of Cruella was provided by Betty Lou Gerson. She had worked for Disney prior as the narrator for Cinderella, but her voice talent as Cruella De Vil is her tour de force! The highly pitched phrase "Anita Darling!" is completely iconic and has become part of Disney pop culture.


Cruella De Vil production animation cel without the background.


Close up of the production number.

This is absolutely perfect cel of Cruella De Vil from the scene when she appears in the film. She storms into Roger and Anita's home looking for Pongo and Perdita's dalmatian puppies. She is full figure, her eyes and mouth are open, and she is wearing her classic mink coat and carrying her cigarette with holder. A great addition to any Disney Villain or animation art collection!

Original Production Animation Cel of The Lily Flower from "Alice In Wonderland," 1951


Original hand inked and hand painted production animation cel of the Lily Flower set on a lithographic background from "Alice In Wonderland," 1951, Walt Disney Studios; Size - Lily: 6 x 5 1/4", Image 9 x 11 3/4"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"You can learn a lot of things from the flowers." - The Flowers

"Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" (commonly shortened to "Alice in Wonderland"), is a 1865 novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson who wrote under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. Disney reworked the story to fit with both a younger audience and a time frame suitable for an animated film (it's run time is only 75 minutes).

Kathryn Beaumont, who was born in London England, was just 10 years old when she was chosen for the voice of Alice. Walt Disney personally cast Beaumont after seeing her in the film "On an Island with You," in which the child actress had a small role. Disney was so impressed by her that she was also chosen to be the model for Alice, and would also go on to provide the voice for Wendy in "Peter Pan," 1953. Beaumont has also reprised her voice acting role as Alice in two episodes of the animated series, Disney's "House of Mouse," and as both Alice and Wendy in the video game "Kingdom Hearts." She did not retire as the voice of Alice and Wendy until 2005, when her role for these two characters was taken over by Hynden Walch.


Original production animation cel of the Lily without the background.

While a shrunken Alice is chasing after the White Rabbit, she runs into a flower garden where she encounters a large group of beautiful flowers. Alice begins to talk with them and the flowers exclaim they can sing, and The Red Rose (the leader) says, "Girls! We shall sing "Golden Afternoon". That's about all of us." After the song, all the flowers try to figure out what kind of flower is Alice. When Alice replies that she isn't a flower, they determine that she must be a weed and change their attitude towards her; and they chase her out of their garden.

This is a very rare original production animation cel of The Lily from "Alice In Wonderland," 1951. Her flower face is wonderfully composed of petals, stamen, and pistol. A beautiful and great addition to any animation art collection.

Original Production Animation Cel of The Iris Flower from "Alice In Wonderland," 1951


Original hand inked and hand painted production animation cel of the Iris Flower from "Alice In Wonderland," 1951, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 133 in ink lower right; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Iris: 9 x 8 1/2", Image 9 3/4 x 11 3/4", Mat 16 x 18"; Triple matted.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Aha! Just as I suspected! She's nothing but a common mobile vulgaris!" - Iris
"A common what?" - Alice
"To put it bluntly: a weed!" - Iris

"Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" (commonly shortened to "Alice in Wonderland"), is a 1865 novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson who wrote under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. Disney reworked the story to fit with both a younger audience and a time frame suitable for an animated film (it's run time is only 75 minutes).

Kathryn Beaumont, who was born in London England, was just 10 years old when she was chosen for the voice of Alice. Walt Disney personally cast Beaumont after seeing her in the film "On an Island with You," in which the child actress had a small role. Disney was so impressed by her that she was also chosen to be the model for Alice, and would also go on to provide the voice for Wendy in "Peter Pan," 1953. Beaumont has also reprised her voice acting role as Alice in two episodes of the animated series, Disney's "House of Mouse," and as both Alice and Wendy in the video game "Kingdom Hearts." She did not retire as the voice of Alice and Wendy until 2005, when her role for these two characters was taken over by Hynden Walch.


Original production animation cel of the Iris without the background.

Close up of the production number.

While a shrunken Alice is chasing after the White Rabbit, she runs into a flower garden where she encounters a large group of beautiful flowers. Alice begins to talk with them and the flowers exclaim they can sing, and The Red Rose (the leader) says, "Girls! We shall sing "Golden Afternoon". That's about all of us." After the song, all the flowers try to figure out what kind of flower is Alice. When Alice replies that she isn't a flower, they determine that she must be a weed and change their attitude towards her; and they chase her out of their garden.


Triple matted original production animation cel of the Iris.

This is a very rare and large original production animation cel of The Iris from "Alice In Wonderland," 1951. Her eyes and mouth are open and she is holding her eyeglasses in front of her. She inspects Alice and concludes that she is a weed. The dialog for the scene is below:

Iris: "Aha! Just as I suspected! She's nothing but a common mobile vulgaris!"
Alice: "A common what?"
Iris: "To put it bluntly: a weed!"

Original Production Animation Drawing of Ariel from "The Little Mermaid," 1989


Original production animation drawing of Ariel in graphite pencil from "The Little Mermaid," 1989, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 15 lower right, production numbers lower edge, and animation ladder center right; Size - Ariel: 7 x 3 3/4", Sheet 10 1/2 x 12 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"I'm not asking much. Just a token really, a trifle. You'll never even miss it. What I want from you is... Your voice." - Ursula
"My voice?" - Ariel

"The Little Mermaid," is an American animated musical fantasy film and the 28th film in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series. It was produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures to theaters on November 17, 1989. The film was based on the Danish fairy tale of the same name by Hans Christian Andersen, which tells the story of a beautiful mermaid princess who dreams of becoming human. The film was written, directed, and produced by Ron Clements and John Musker; with music by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman. The voice cast includes: Jodi Benson, Christopher Daniel Barnes, Pat Carroll, Samuel E. Wright, Jason Marin, Kenneth Mars, Buddy Hackett, and René Auberjonois.

There was more money and resources dedicated by the Walt Disney Studios to "The Little Mermaid" than any other Disney animated film in decades. Aside from its main animation facility in Glendale, California; Disney opened a satellite feature animation facility in Lake Buena Vista, Florida that was within the Disney-MGM Studios Theme Park at Walt Disney World. Their first projects were to produce an entire Roger Rabbit cartoon short, "Roller Coaster Rabbit," and to contribute ink and paint support to "The Little Mermaid." Another first for Disney films of recent years, was the filming of live actors and actresses for motion reference material for the animators. Broadway actress Jodi Benson (who was predominantly a stage actress when she was cast) was chosen to play Ariel, and Sherri Lynn Stoner, a former member of Los Angeles' Groundlings improvisation comedy group, acted out Ariel's key scenes.

"The Little Mermaid," 1989 was the final Disney film using hand painted animation cels. Disney Studios, specifically Ron Clements and John Musker, adapted the Hans Christian Anderson story to give the villain a much bigger role. The first choice to voice the character was Beatrice Arthur who turned down the part. It was eventually accepted by veteran stage actress Elaine Stritch; however she clashed with the music stylist. The voice was finally given to Pat Caroll who described the role as, "part Shakespearean actress, with all the flair, flamboyance and theatricality, and part used-car salesman with a touch of con artist." Although I would have loved to have heard Arthur and Stritch sing "Pour Unfortunate Souls," Ursula is the absolute embodiment of Caroll and I think she was the best choice!


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Ariel.

The animation of Ursula was initially offered to Glen Keane, however after hearing Jodi Benson sing "Part of Your World" he wanted to animate Ariel instead and so Ursula ended up going to Disney animator, Ruben Aquino. Aquino credits Ursula as his favorite character in which he has ever worked and said, "When animating Ursula, I was inspired mainly by the voice and by the story sketches, but of course, I also worked very closely with the directors (John Musker and Ron Clements) to realize their vision. Given a great voice, the scenes almost animate themselves, and that definitely was the case with Pat Carroll's amazing vocal performance. I also did a lot of research on octopus locomotion to make sure Ursula's movements were convincing."

The Little Mermaid's supervising animators included Glen Keane and Mark Henn on Ariel, Duncan Marjoribanks on Sebastian, Andreas Deja on King Triton, and Ruben Aquino on Ursula. Originally, Keane had been asked to work on Ursula, as he had established a reputation for drawing large powerful figures, such as the bear in "The Fox and the Hound," 1981 and Professor Ratigan in "The Great Mouse Detective," 1986. Keane however, was assigned as one of the two lead artists on the petite Ariel and oversaw the "Part of Your World" musical number. He jokingly stated that his wife looks exactly like Ariel "without the fins." The character's body type and personality were based upon that of Alyssa Milano, who was starring on TV's "Who's the Boss?". The effect of Ariel's hair underwater was based on footage of Sally Ride when she was in space; and scenes of Sherri Lynn Stoner in a swimming pool were used in animating Ariel's swimming. A challenge in animating Ariel were the colors required to show her in various changing environments, both under the sea and on land. By the end of the film, the animators required a total of 32-color models; not including costume changes. The sea-green color of her fin was a hue specially mixed by the Disney paint lab, and the color was named "Ariel" after the character.

This is an outstanding drawing from Ursula's famous song "Poor Unfortunate Souls," one of the true highlights of the entire film! This drawing is from the most famous part of the sequence; when Ursula tells Ariel that in return for making her human, Ursula wants Ariel's voice as payment. The dialog for the scene is below:

Ursula: "Oh, and there is one more thing. We haven't discussed the subject of payment. You can't get something for nothing, you know."
Ariel: "But I don't have any..."
Ursula: "I'm not asking much. Just a token really, a trifle. You'll never even miss it. What I want from you is... Your voice."
Ariel: "My voice?"
Ursula: "You got it, sweetcakes. No talking, singing, zip."

Original Production Animation Drawing of Peg from "Lady and the Tramp," 1955


Original production animation drawing of Peg in graphite, blue, and red pencils from "Lady and the Tramp," 1955, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered A-53 in pencil lower right; Size - Peg: 7 1/2 x 7 1/2", Sheet 12 1/2 x 15 1/2"; Unframed.


"He's a Tramp, but they love him. Breaks a new heart everyday. He's a Tramp, they adore him. And I only hope he'll stay that way!" - Peg

"Lady and the Tramp" (released on June 22, 1955) is a full length featured animated film produced by Walt Disney and released by Buena Vista Distribution. The film was the 15th in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, and it was the first animated feature filmed in with the CinemaScope widescreen film process. The film was based on the story "Happy Dan, The Whistling Dog" by Ward Greene and tells the story of a female American Cocker Spaniel named Lady who lives with a refined, upper-middle-class family. Lady meets a male stray mutt named Tramp and they embark on many exciting and romantic adventures. 

One evening in 1937, Disney storyman Joe Grant invited Walt Disney over to his house for dinner and ended up showed Disney a drawing he had made of his pet spinger spaniel, who was named Lady. Walt loved the drawing and suggested that Joe make a storyboard out of it; which he did and the plan was to create a new animated film, simply titled "Lady." The story that was pitched ended up being too simplistic to Walt Disney's taste, and the project was put on hold until about 20 years later.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Peg.


Production number.

Besides Lady and Tramp, the standout character is the film is Peg, a Pekingese who is one of the dogs encountered by Lady when she ends up at the dog pound. Peg is named after and slightly resembles her voice actress, Peggy Lee. Peg's highlight in the film was her singing the song "He's A Tramp" in the dog pound. 

Peggy Lee was an American pop and jazz singer, songwriter, and actress who provided the original speaking and singing voices of not only Peg, but Si and Am and Darling. Lee also composed the majority of the film's soundtrack with Sonny Burke; as well as performed "He's a Tramp", "La La Lu", "What Is a Baby?", and "The Siamese Cat Song."

Peg was wonderfully animated by veteran Disney animator Eric Larson. From Walt Disney animator Andreas Deja:
"Eric usually downplayed his capabilities as a draughtsman when compared to animators like Kahl, Davis or Frank and Ollie. But his assignments for the film Lady and the Tramp show clearly that he was not only a great actor with a pencil, but that his drawings were right on par with the studio's high standards. Peg's animation during her song "He's a Tramp" is beautifully timed in its rhythm and elegant moves."

This is a very large and wonderful full figure, eyes and mouth open, original production animation drawing of Peg. Just a perfect image and a great addition to any animation art collection!

Original Production Animation Drawing of Peg from "Lady and the Tramp," 1955


Original production animation drawing of Peg in graphite, blue, and red pencils from "Lady and the Tramp," 1955, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered A-6 in pencil lower right; Size - Peg: 7 1/2 x 7 3/4", Sheet 12 1/2 x 15 1/2"; Unframed.


"He's a Tramp, but they love him. Breaks a new heart everyday. He's a Tramp, they adore him. And I only hope he'll stay that way!" - Peg

"Lady and the Tramp" (released on June 22, 1955) is a full length featured animated film produced by Walt Disney and released by Buena Vista Distribution. The film was the 15th in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, and it was the first animated feature filmed in with the CinemaScope widescreen film process. The film was based on the story "Happy Dan, The Whistling Dog" by Ward Greene and tells the story of a female American Cocker Spaniel named Lady who lives with a refined, upper-middle-class family. Lady meets a male stray mutt named Tramp and they embark on many exciting and romantic adventures. 

One evening in 1937, Disney storyman Joe Grant invited Walt Disney over to his house for dinner and ended up showed Disney a drawing he had made of his pet spinger spaniel, who was named Lady. Walt loved the drawing and suggested that Joe make a storyboard out of it; which he did and the plan was to create a new animated film, simply titled "Lady." The story that was pitched ended up being too simplistic to Walt Disney's taste, and the project was put on hold until about 20 years later.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Peg.


Production number.

Besides Lady and Tramp, the standout character is the film is Peg, a Pekingese who is one of the dogs encountered by Lady when she ends up at the dog pound. Peg is named after and slightly resembles her voice actress, Peggy Lee. Peg's highlight in the film was her singing the song "He's A Tramp" in the dog pound. 

Peggy Lee was an American pop and jazz singer, songwriter, and actress who provided the original speaking and singing voices of not only Peg, but Si and Am and Darling. Lee also composed the majority of the film's soundtrack with Sonny Burke; as well as performed "He's a Tramp", "La La Lu", "What Is a Baby?", and "The Siamese Cat Song."

Peg was wonderfully animated by veteran Disney animator Eric Larson. From Walt Disney animator Andreas Deja:
"Eric usually downplayed his capabilities as a draughtsman when compared to animators like Kahl, Davis or Frank and Ollie. But his assignments for the film Lady and the Tramp show clearly that he was not only a great actor with a pencil, but that his drawings were right on par with the studio's high standards. Peg's animation during her song "He's a Tramp" is beautifully timed in its rhythm and elegant moves."

This is a very large and wonderful full figure, eyes and mouth open, original production animation drawing of Peg. Just a perfect image and a great addition to any animation art collection!

Saturday, December 30, 2017

Original Production Animation Cel of Prince John from "Robin Hood," 1973


Original hand painted production animation cel of Prince John from "Robin Hood," 1973, Walt Disney Studios; Walt Disney seal lower left;Set on a lithographic background; Size - Prince John: 6 x 9 3/4", Image 9 x 13 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Robin Hood" was the twenty-first full length animated film released by Walt Disney Studios on November 8, 1973. Robin Hood is an anthropomorphic fox and the protagonist of the film. Although Robin Hood is often shown as an outlaw who chooses to rob from the rich to help the poor people, in this Disney animated version, he is shown mainly attacking Prince John and his agents (Sir Hiss and the Sheriff of Nottingham), who have impoverished Nottingham with high taxes. Robin Hood and Little John steal the tax caravans and give it back to the peasants while trying to avoid capture.


Original production animation cel of Prince John without the background.


Close up of the original production animation cel of Prince John.


Close up of the Walt Disney seal.

Prince John is a spoiled King who will resort to any underhanded trick so that he can maintain the crown and throne of Nottingham. He was voiced by the great and deep voiced Peter Ustinov, Sir Hiss (Prince John's snake advisor) was voiced by Terry-Thomas (who's hissing speech was masterful); and both were animated by Ollie Johnston. This is a wonderful original production animation cel of Prince John. The large image shows him with his right paw fist out stretched and his eyes and mouth open. He is wearing his crown and blue royal robe and tunic. A great hand painted work of art from one of the most beloved Walt Disney feature films!

Original Production Animation Cels of Tigger and Rabbit from "The Many Adventures of Winnie The Pooh," 1977


Original hand painted production animation cels of Tigger and Rabbit set on a lithographic background from "The Many Adventures of Winnie The Pooh," 1977; Tigger cel numbered A43 and with Walt Disney seal lower right; Rabbit cel numbered R195 lower right; Size - Tigger: 5 x 3 1/4", Rabbit: 3 x 2 1/2", Image 11 x 14"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"The wonderful thing about tiggers / Is tiggers are wonderful things / Their tops are made out of rubber / Their bottoms are made out of springs / They're bouncy, trouncy, flouncy, pouncy, fun, fun, fun, fun, fun / But the most wonderful thing about tiggers is I'm the only one / IIIII'm the only one!" - Tigger

Tigger is one of the most loved characters in the Walt Disney pantheon! It is practically impossible to find anyone who does not love him. In the case of the Pooh stories, there were no real Villains; the closest thing would be Rabbit, who was the main antagonist. However, Tigger was simply fun loving and without question had some the best lines such as "The name's Tigger! T-I-double-guh-ER! That spells Tigger!" Tigger also has one of the best songs, "The Wonderful Thing about Tiggers."


Original hand painted production animation cel of Tigger without the background.



Close up of the original hand painted production animation cel of Tigger.


Close up of the Walt Disney seal and the Tigger production number.

"The Many Adventures of Winnie The Pooh," 1977 was composed of a series of featurettes Disney produced based upon the Winnie-the-Pooh books by A. A. Milne. Walt Disney wanted to introduce the public to the Pooh characters slowly over time and the released featurettes include, "Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree," 1966, "Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day." 1968, and "Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too," 1974. For the full length film in 1977, extra material was added and used to link the three featurettes together. A fourth, shorter featurette was added at the end of the film and was based on the final chapter of "The House at Pooh Corner."


Original hand painted production animation cel of Rabbit without the background.


Close up of the original hand painted production animation cel of Rabbit.


Close up of the Rabbit production number.

In "Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too," Rabbit was animated by the great Don Bluth and was voiced by Junius Matthews; a veteran radio actor who also voiced the owl Archimedes in the Disney film "The Sword In The Stone," 1963. Tigger was animated by one of the greatest Disney animators ever, Milt Kahl and voiced by Paul Winchell. Winchell was a ventriloquist, actor, and comedian who would later  provide the voice of Gargamel and Dick Dastardly. Winchell appeared in acting roles on numerous TV shows from the 1950's on through the 1970's. What many people do not know is that Paul Winchell, who had some medical training and was also an inventor; became the first person to build and patent a mechanical artificial heart which was implantable in the chest cavity. He was also honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for all of his work in television.


Close up of the Walt Disney Seal.

This is a wonderful two cel setup of a very bouncy Tigger and a extremely frustrated Rabbit! Both characters are full figure and in their classic poses; with Tigger bouncing and dancing around inside of Rabbit's home, and Rabbit with a fallen picture frame around him. An outstanding large image, and a great addition to any animation art collection.

Original Production Animation Cel of Shere Khan from "The Jungle Book," 1967


Original hand painted production animation cel of Shere Khan from "The Jungle Book," 1967, Walt Disney Studios; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Shere Khan: 7 1/2" x 7 3/4", Image 9 x 11 1/2", Frame 14 1/4 x 17 1/4"; Framed with a gold metal frame, double matted, and plexiglass.


"The Jungle Book," 1967 was the nineteenth animated feature film produced by Walt Disney Productions and inspired by Rudyard Kipling's book of the same name. The film was directed by Wolfgang Reitherman, it was to be the last film that was worked on by Walt Disney, as he passed away during its production. The film follows Mowgli, a feral child raised in the Indian jungle by wolves, as he encounters Bagheera the panther and Baloo the bear; who try and convince him to leave the jungle before the villainous tiger Shere Khan finds him. Voice actors include: Phil Harris, Sebastian Cabot, George Sanders and Louis Prima; as well as Disney regulars such as Sterling Holloway, J. Pat O'Malley, Verna Felton, and the director's son, Bruce Reitherman, as the voice of Mowgli.

Shere Khan, a Bengal tiger, is the main antagonist in the 1967 Walt Disney film "The Jungle Book;" an adaption of writer Rudyard Kipling's series of stories. Khan was voiced by George Sanders, a veteran actor with a deep bass voice and a heavy British accent. According to Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston from "The Disney Villain":

"The perfect choice for the voice was George Sanders, the complete cynic, who added the element of boredom. With this voice, we could imagine a tiger who would kill without concern or effort. Sanders was asked if he would like a drawing of Shere Khan as a souvenir, to which he responded, "I suppose so." Asked further if he would like Walt to autograph it, he replied, "How utterly absurb. Why would I want his signature? He might want mine, I created the character."

Milt Kahl, the great veteran Disney animator, was in charge of bringing Shere Khan to life and so of course Kahl set out on a crash course in tigers. Kahl said in an interview:  I learned so much about tigers by studying them that I didn't have to rely on any life action crutch." From Disney animator Andreas Dejas about the animation of Shere Khan, "Great perspective walk, and I love the way the tiger lies down, upper body first, then the rear.  The way he moves those front feet is worth studying alone. Such great anatomy."


Framed original production animation cel of Shere Khan.

This is a wonderful original production animation cel of the evil tiger, Shere Khan. He is shown in a three quarters portrait image with his yellow eyes open, frowning, and his left ear lifted; searching out any sound of the man cub Mowgli. It really does not get better, just a spectacular setup of the villianous tiger that is perfect for any animation art collection!