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Sunday, November 20, 2016

Original Production Animation Cels of Drizella and Anastasia Tremaine from "Cinderella," 1950


Original hand inked and hand painted production animation cels of Drizella and Anastasia Tremaine set on a lithographic background from "Cinderella," 1950, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered C-17 and 85 in ink bottom right; Size - Drizella: 7 1/2 x 2 1/2", Anastasia: 6 1/2 x 4 1/4"; Both cels 12 1/2 x 15 1/4", Image 10 3/4 x 14 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase these cels or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

The 1950 Walt Disney feature film "Cinderella" was based on the French version of the tale by Charles Perrault, entitled "Cinderella" and written in 1698. The film was the second in the series of great Princess films developed by Disney, the first being Snow White in 1937. The character of Cinderella is usually front and center in the pantheon of Disney Princess merchandise, perhaps because she is the only Princess not to be of a noble blood line who ended up marrying a Prince and becoming royalty.


Close up of the original production animation cel of Anastasia.


Close up of the original production animation cel of Drizella.

The story of Cinderella presented a situation where a villain lived and interacted with her victim day after day under the same roof. The actions of Cinderella's wicked Stepmother seemed even more cruel because not only were both she and Cinderella animated in a very realistic fashion; but because of the close proximity the cruelness of the villain could be seen, as even more intense, by the reactions on Cinderella's face. If all this were not enough, the Stepmother's arsenal of evil was compounded by her two ill mannered daughters Anastasia and Drizella; as well as Lucifer the cat, who delighted in trying to kill Cinderella's mouse friends.

Both Drizella and Anastasia Tremaine are very selfish, spoiled, and greedy; just like their mother, Lady Tremaine. All three are very jealous of Cinderella's success and beauty, and each enjoys seeing her slave away inside of the Tremaine household. Both sisters are portrayed as ugly both inside and out, and each tries to make Cinderella's life miserable in every way possible.


Original production animation cel of Drizella without the background.


Close up of the production number.

Drizella has a slender figure, fair skin, black eyes, and shoulder-length, dark brown hair with rolled locks on the back. She appears in a long short-sleeved dress of different shades of yellow, chartreuse, and light green; complete with matching yellow flats. In the ballroom scene and after ripping apart Cinderella's pink dress along with her sister Anastasia, Drizella wears a dress of different shades of green with cyan frill outlines, and has a single teal feather on her head. She also has large feet, as evidenced by her attempt at trying on Cinderella's glass slipper nearing the end of the film. She was animated by Ollie Johnston and voiced by Rhonda Williams.


Original production animation cel of Anastasia without the background.


Close up of the production number.

Anastasia has a slender figure, fair skin, long red hair, and black eyes. She wears a long short-sleeved gown composed of different shades of pink and magenta with matching purple flats. Her long red hair is tied in several ringlets and she wears a golden hair clip. Anastasia was animated by Ollie Johnston and voiced by Lucille Bliss. Bliss also voiced the Sunflower and Tulip in "Alice In Wonderland," the commercial singer in "One Hundred and One Dalmatians," and is most remembered as the original voice of Smurfette in "The Smurfs."

This is a wonderful two cel setup of both of Cinderella's wicked stepsisters, Drizella and Anastasia Tremaine. Both are full figure and dressed ready to attend the King's Royal Ball. A wonderful and rare set of original production cels from Walt Disney's classic film "Cinderella." A great addition to any animation collection!

Original Production Animation Cel of Mad Madam Mim in Dragon Form with Spots from "The Sword In The Stone," 1963


Original hand painted production animation cel of Mad Madam Mim in Dragon form with spots from "The Sword In The Stone," 1963, Walt Disney Studios; Size - Madam Mim: 7 1/4 x 9 1/4", Image 9 3/4 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"The Sword in the Stone," 1963 is the 18th full length feature film produced by Walt Disney and it was released on December 25, 1963 by Buena Vista Distribution. The film was based on the novel of the same name, that was first published in 1938. It was later republished in 1958 as the first book of T. H. White's tetralogy "The Once and Future King." It was to be the final Disney animated film released before Walt Disney's death on December 15, 1966. The songs in the film were written and composed by the Sherman Brothers, who would become very famous for their future work on later Disney films including; "Mary Poppins," 1964, "The Jungle Book," 1967, and "Bedknobs and Broomsticks," 1971.


Close up of the original production animation cel of Mad Madam Mim in Dragon Form.

Madam Mim was the villain in the film and was voiced by Martha Wentworth, a veteran actress with a long radio history dating back to the 1920's. She was the voice of several Disney characters in "101 Dalmatians" including Nanny; and Mim was her final credited role. Madam Mim was animated by two of Disney's greatest animators Milt Kahl (who also designed the character, refining storyboard sketches from animator Bill Peet), and Frank Thomas. Kahl animated her first appearance in the film, her initial interaction with Arthur; while Frank Thomas oversaw her famous "Wizards' Duel" with Merlin.

Although Mim claims to be more powerful than Merlin, during her opening scene she does only minor tricks. When Merlin stops her from attacking Arthur she challenges him to a Wizard's duel which involves mutating into various forms in order to best your opponent. She states that she is "mad for games," and lays out the rules for her duel with Merlin.

MADAM MIM: "Now, rule one, no mineral or vegetable. Only animal. Rule two, no make-believe things like, pink dragons and stuff. Now, rule three, no disappearing."
MERLIN: "Rule four, no cheating."
MADAM MIM: "All right, all right."


Original production animation cel of Mad Madam Mim in Dragon Form without the background.

At the very start of the duel, Mim breaks her own rule by disappearing and proves she can not be trusted. During the battle, Mim's incredible shape shifting abilities almost give her the upper hand against Merlin. She turned herself into: an alligator, a fox, a hen, an elephant, a tiger, a rattlesnake, and a rhinoceros, all of which were colored pink and finally into an ugly, purple, fire-breathing dragon. She then asks Merlin (knowing that her rule stated no Pink Dragons), "Did I say no purple Dragons?" However, Merlin outsmarts her by transforming into a fictional germ called "Malignalitaloptereosis" that infects her with a chickenpox-like disease complete with red spots and a fever; effectively defeating her and illustrating the importance of knowledge over strength.

This is a great cel of a full figure Mad Madam Mim in Dragon form after being infected by "Malignalitaloptereosis," which makes her break out with red spots. She has purple hair and her arms are in the air, because she is very upset at being outsmarted by Merlin. A rare and wonderful cel of one of Disney's most memorable contemporary villians!

Saturday, November 19, 2016

Original Production Animation Cel of Edgar from "The Aristocats," 1970


Original hand painted production animation cel of Edgar from "The Aristocats," 1970, Walt Disney Studios; Set on a lithographic background; Numbered 67 in ink lower right; Size - Edgar: 7 1/2" x 5", Cel: 12 1/2 x 15 3/4", Image: 10 x 13 1/4"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"The Aristocats," 1970 is an animated feature film produced and released by Walt Disney Productions.  This was the last film project to be approved by Walt Disney himself, as he died in late 1966, before the film was finally released to theaters by Buena Vista Distribution on December 11, 1970. "The Aristocats" featured the voice talent of Eva Gabor, Hermione Baddeley, Phil Harris, Dean Clark, Sterling Holloway, Scatman Crothers, and Roddy Maude-Roxby.


Close up of the original production animation cel of Edgar.

The film is based on a story by Tom McGowan and Tom Rowe, and centers around a family of aristocratic cats. After the mistress's butler kidnaps them (to gain his mistress' fortune which was intended to go to the cats) an unlikely alley cat acquaintance helps them escape and be returned to their home. 


Original production animation cel of Edgar without the background.

It is Paris 1910 and Madame Bonfamille tells her lawyer Georges Hautecourt that she has decided to leave all of her stocks, bonds, mansion, treasures, jewels, and her entire fortune to her beloved cats rather than to her butler, Edgar Balthazar.  When Edgar overhears this he fears the cats will outlive him, and that he will never see a penny of the inheritance.  He then realizes that he has to get rid of the cats; "I'll be gone, no oh no... they'll be gone," he says.  Edgar decides to put sleeping tablets into the cats milk and when they fall asleep, he takes them in a covered basket on his motorcycle far away from the city of Paris. 


Close up of the production number.

The character of Edgar was voiced by Roddy Maude-Roxby, an accomplished English actor.  He was just wonderful in the role with the delightful snooty English butler voice, that could also morph into a scheming cunning timber perfect for a Disney Villain.
This cel appears in the scene when Edgar enters the music room bearing a tray of bowls of milk, laced with "Dr. Restwell's Sleeping Tablets." He says, "Ah, good evening, my little ones. Your favorite dish prepared a very special way. It's crème de la crème à la Edgar. Sleep well. I-I mean, eat-- eat well, of course." An absolutely wonderful full figure image of Edgar from one his most wicked scenes, holding the laced tray of milk. A great addition to any animation art collection!

Original Production Animation Cel of Wart from "The Sword In The Stone," 1963


Original hand painted production animation cel of Wart from "The Sword In The Stone," 1963, Walt Disney Studios; Set on a lithographic background; With special effects overlay cel; Size - Wart (King Arthur): 7 x 5 1/2", Image 10 x 11 1/2"; Framed with a black and gold frame, two acid free linen mats, a gold fillet, and UV conservation clear glass.


"The Sword in the Stone," 1963 is the 18th full length feature film produced by Walt Disney and it was released on December 25, 1963 by Buena Vista Distribution. The film was based on the novel of the same name, that was first published in 1938. It was later republished in 1958 as the first book of T. H. White's tetralogy "The Once and Future King." It was to be the final Disney animated film released before Walt Disney's death on December 15, 1966. The songs in the film were written and composed by the Sherman Brothers, who would become very famous for their future work on later Disney films including; "Mary Poppins," 1964, "The Jungle Book," 1967, and "Bedknobs and Broomsticks," 1971.


Original production animation cel of Wart without the Effects cel.


Original production animation cel of Wart without the Effects cel and the background.


Effects cel.

Wart was animated by both Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston; and the voice was provided by three different actors; Rickie Sorensen, Richard Reitherman and his brother Robert Reitherman. This lead to noticeable changes in the character's voice between scenes. Also, the three voices all have Brooklyn-esque accents, which differed with the English setting for the film and with the accents spoken by all other characters.

On Christmas Eve, Wart's foster brother Kay is knighted and Wart is reinstated as Kay's squire. On the day of the tournament, Wart realizes that he has left Kay's sword at an Inn, which is now closed. Archimedes sees the Sword in the Stone, and Wart removes it and returns with it to the tournament. Sir Ector, Wart's foster father, recognizes the sword as the one from the stone and the tournament is halted. Sir Ector places the sword back in its anvil, demanding Wart prove that he pulled it. Thinking now that anyone can pull the sword easily, Kay and others try unsuccessfully to remove it. Sir Pellinore and Sir Bart stand up for Wart and encourage him to try and pull the sword again.


Framed original hand painted production animation cel of Wart.

This cel is from the scene when Wart, surrounding by onlookers, pulls the Sword Excalibur from the anvil and fulfills the prophecy that "whoso pulleth out this sword of this stone and anvil is rightwise king, born of England." Wart is then crowned King Arthur of England and Merlin tells Arthur that he will go on to lead the Knights of the Round Table and become very famous. This is an extremely rare original production animation cel from the high point of the film. An absolutely phenomenal piece of original animation artwork perfect for any collection!

To see the cel in the film, just click on the short video below:

video