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Thursday, June 30, 2016

Original Production Animation Drawing of The Mock Prince from "Sleeping Beauty," 1959


Original production animation drawing of The Mock Prince in graphite pencil from "Sleeping Beauty," 1959, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 330 lower right; Size - Mock Prince: 5 1/2 x 4 1/2", Sheet 12 1/2 x 15 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Sleeping Beauty," the 1959 Walt Disney full length motion picture, introduced two characters that would become universal favorites; Maleficent and Princess Aurora. Aurora, along with Snow White and Cinderella would be forever immortalized in the public's view as the three greatest Disney Princesses. The original design for Aurora and her peasant disguise Briar Rose was developed by Tom Oreb, who based the character on the famed Hollywood actress Audrey Hepburn; known for her thin frame and a very graceful demeanor. Marc Davis, the head animator, would continue the development process by morphing her general appearance and the clothing of the heroine. The fine tuning of the character continued so that she could be combined with the very angular forms present in the Eyvind Earle hand painted backgrounds.

As with other Disney films, an actress was hired as a live-action model (as a guide for the animators) for Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Helene Stanley, who was also the model for Cinderella in 1950, became the model for the heroine. It is interesting to note that prior to marrying Marc Davis in 1956, Alice (Davis) designed some of costumes worn by Stanley in her acting role in "Sleeping Beauty."


Close up of the original production animation drawing of The Mock Prince.

In 1952, the professional opera singer Mary Costa, after meeting people at a party with her future husband director Frank Tashlin, auditioned for the part of Disney's Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Walt Disney called her personally within hours of the audition to inform her that the part was hers. The success of the film "Sleeping Beauty," owes a chuck of those accolades to the voice of Mary Costa. Her songs were some of the most beautiful ever sung by a Disney Princess. In November 1999 Mary Costa received the Disney Legends Award, and her handprints are now a permanent part of the Disney Legends Plaza at the entrance to Walt Disney Studios.

Prince Phillip was animated by Milt Kahl and voiced Bill Shirley and Aurora was animated by Marc Davis (who was also lead animator for Maleficent) and voiced by Mary Costa. Both Bill and Mary would be live action models for Prince Phillip and Briar Rose/Princess Aurora for the animators, and their chemistry was magical on screen. In addition, their singing together was one of the many highlights of the film.


Close up of the production number.

This drawing is from the section in the film when Prince Phillip is riding his horse in the forest when he suddenly hears a young girl's voice singing, and orders his horse Samson to take him there. But on the way, Samson goes too fast and accidentally knocks Phillip into a puddle of water. Phillip hangs his wet cape, hat, and boots on nearby tree limbs to dry. He suddenly turns around and notices that some of the forest animals have taken off with his clothes. The Mock Prince is a name given to the cape, hat, and boots that were taken and animated by the forest animals. There is rabbit in each boot, the owl is the head in the cape (that is supported by a bird at each of the ends of the caplet), and a squirrel animates the hat. Briar Rose begins to move and dance with the Mock Prince, all the while singing the song "Once Upon a Dream." The animated sequence is one of the most beautiful and memorable in the entire film.

This is wonderful original production animation drawing of the Mock Prince. The owl can be seen flying the cape into the air, and the ends of the caplet are being supported by two birds. The hat sits on the owl's head, and the tip of the squirrel's tail is poking out. A beautiful drawing of the Mock Prince from the last of the vintage Walt Disney feature films.

Original Production Animation Drawing of Briar Rose from "Sleeping Beauty," 1959


Original production animation drawing of Briar Rose in graphite pencil from "Sleeping Beauty," 1959, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 75 in pencil lower right; Size - Briar Rose: 7 x 4 3/4", Sheet 12 1/2 x 15 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Sleeping Beauty," the 1959 Walt Disney full length motion picture, introduced two characters that would become universal favorites; Maleficent and Princess Aurora. Aurora, along with Snow White and Cinderella would be forever immortalized in the public's view as the three greatest Disney Princesses. The original design for Aurora and her peasant disguise Briar Rose was developed by Tom Oreb, who based the character on the famed Hollywood actress Audrey Hepburn; known for her thin frame and a very graceful demeanor. Marc Davis, the head animator, would continue the development process by morphing her general appearance and the clothing of the heroine. The fine tuning of the character continued so that she could be combined with the very angular forms present in the Eyvind Earle hand painted backgrounds.

As with other Disney films, an actress was hired as a live-action model (as a guide for the animators) for Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Helene Stanley, who was also the model for Cinderella in 1950, became the model for the heroine. It is interesting to note that prior to marrying Marc Davis in 1956, Alice (Davis) designed some of costumes worn by Stanley in her acting role in "Sleeping Beauty."


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Briar Rose.

In 1952, the professional opera singer Mary Costa, after meeting people at a party with her future husband director Frank Tashlin, auditioned for the part of Disney's Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Walt Disney called her personally within hours of the audition to inform her that the part was hers. The success of the film "Sleeping Beauty," owes a chuck of those accolades to the voice of Mary Costa. Her songs were some of the most beautiful ever sung by a Disney Princess. In November 1999 Mary Costa received the Disney Legends Award, and her hand prints are now a permanent part of the Disney Legends Plaza at the entrance to Walt Disney Studios.


Close up of the production number.

After Maleficent's evil curse that Princess Aurora would (before the sun sets on her sixteenth birthday) prick her finger on the spindle of a spinning wheel and die; the three Good Fairies disguise Aurora as a peasant named Briar Rose and hide her deep in a remote forest cottage. The majority of the movie focuses on Briar Rose, and this is a beautiful original production drawing of her. The drawing is used in the scene when Flora, Fauna, and Merryweather send Rose out on a task to pick a basket full of berries; so that they will be alone to make her a beautiful dress and an extra special birthday cake! The dialog for the scene is below:

Merryweather: "We want you to pick some berries."
Flora: "That's it, berries!"
Briar Rose: "Berries?"
Fauna: "Lots of berries."
Briar Rose: "But, I picked berries yesterday."
Flora: "Oh, w-we need more, dear."
Fauna: "Lots, lots more."
Flora: "Yes! Now don't hurry back, dear."
Merryweather: "But don't go too far."
Flora: "And don't speak to strangers."
Fauna: "Goodbye, dear."
All Three Fairies: "Goodbye! Goodbye! Goodbye!"

To view the scene which this drawing was used to create, click on the short video below:

video

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Original Production Animation Drawing of Briar Rose from "Sleeping Beauty," 1959


Original production animation drawing of Briar Rose in graphite pencil from "Sleeping Beauty," 1959, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 49 in pencil lower right; Size - Briar Rose: 7 x 4 3/4", Sheet 12 1/2 x 15 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Sleeping Beauty," the 1959 Walt Disney full length motion picture, introduced two characters that would become universal favorites; Maleficent and Princess Aurora. Aurora, along with Snow White and Cinderella would be forever immortalized in the public's view as the three greatest Disney Princesses. The original design for Aurora and her peasant disguise Briar Rose was developed by Tom Oreb, who based the character on the famed Hollywood actress Audrey Hepburn; known for her thin frame and a very graceful demeanor. Marc Davis, the head animator, would continue the development process by morphing her general appearance and the clothing of the heroine. The fine tuning of the character continued so that she could be combined with the very angular forms present in the Eyvind Earle hand painted backgrounds.

As with other Disney films, an actress was hired as a live-action model (as a guide for the animators) for Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Helene Stanley, who was also the model for Cinderella in 1950, became the model for the heroine. It is interesting to note that prior to marrying Marc Davis in 1956, Alice (Davis) designed some of costumes worn by Stanley in her acting role in "Sleeping Beauty."


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Briar Rose.

In 1952, the professional opera singer Mary Costa, after meeting people at a party with her future husband director Frank Tashlin, auditioned for the part of Disney's Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Walt Disney called her personally within hours of the audition to inform her that the part was hers. The success of the film "Sleeping Beauty," owes a chuck of those accolades to the voice of Mary Costa. Her songs were some of the most beautiful ever sung by a Disney Princess. In November 1999 Mary Costa received the Disney Legends Award, and her hand prints are now a permanent part of the Disney Legends Plaza at the entrance to Walt Disney Studios.


Close up of the production number.

After Maleficent's evil curse that Princess Aurora would (before the sun sets on her sixteenth birthday) prick her finger on the spindle of a spinning wheel and die; the three Good Fairies disguise Aurora as a peasant named Briar Rose and hide her deep in a remote forest cottage. The majority of the movie focuses on Briar Rose, and this is a beautiful original production drawing of her. The drawing is used in the scene when Flora, Fauna, and Merryweather send Rose out on a task to pick a basket full of berries; so that they will be alone to make her a beautiful dress and an extra special birthday cake! The dialog for the scene is below:

Merryweather: "We want you to pick some berries."
Flora: "That's it, berries!"
Briar Rose: "Berries?"
Fauna: "Lots of berries."
Briar Rose: "But, I picked berries yesterday."
Flora: "Oh, w-we need more, dear."
Fauna: "Lots, lots more."
Flora: "Yes! Now don't hurry back, dear."
Merryweather: "But don't go too far."
Flora: "And don't speak to strangers."
Fauna: "Goodbye, dear."
All Three Fairies: "Goodbye! Goodbye! Goodbye!"

To view the scene which this drawing was used to create, click on the short video below:

video

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Original Production Animation Cel of Dumbo and Timothy Q. Mouse On A Courvoisier Background from "Dumbo," 1941


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cel of Dumbo and Timothy Q. Mouse over a Courvoisier air brush background from "Dumbo," 1941, Walt Disney Studios; WDP stamp lower right; With original Courvoisier Galleries label; Size - Dumbo and Timothy Q. Mouse: 9 x 12 3/4", Image 11 x 14 1/2"; Unframed.

"Look out! Look out! Pink elephants on parade! Here they come! Hippety-hoppety. They're here, and there! Pink elephants everywhere!"
Pink Elephants On Parade

The Walt Disney full length feature film "Dumbo," released in 1940, introduced to the world one of the greatest characters in the Disney pantheon, Dumbo the flying elephant! Dumbo was the only character in the film who never uttered a single word, and yet he is one of the most remembered Disney stars. All of his feelings were conveyed through body movements and facial expressions. The extraordinary animation skill needed in order to do this with a human, but in this case a baby elephant, can not be underestimated.


Close up of the original Dumbo and Timothy Q. Mouse production animation cel.

The Disney Studio animation artists were still fairly new to feature animation, having only started in 1937 with "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." The film prior to "Dumbo" was "Fantasia," with one of the most successful sequences being "Night on Bald Mountain." Here again, the main character Chernabog, a huge winged devil, sitting on top of a mountain, commanding the undead below, and never uttering a single word; made a huge impression on the viewing public.

The Disney animator Vladimir "Bill" Tytla created the devil-giant for "Fantasia's" "Night on Bald Mountain," and for the next film he was given the task of animated the film's star, Dumbo. He said: 

"I gave him everything I thought he should have," said Tytla. "It just happened. I don't know a damn thing about elephants. It wasn't that. I was thinking in terms of humans, and I saw a chance to do a chracter without using any cheap theatrics. Most of the expressions and mannerisms I got from my own kid. There's nothing theatrical about a two-year-old kid. They're real and sincere- like when they damn near wet their pants from excitement when you come home at night. I've bawled my kid out for pestering me when I'm reading or something, and he doesn't know what to make of it. He'll just stand there and maybe grab my hand and cry... I tried to put all those things in Dumbo."


Close up of the WDP stamp.

Certainly the greatest theme of "Dumbo" was the wonderful friendship between the mute baby elephant Dumbo and his unlikely friend, a mouse name Timothy. Various Disney animators were involved with the creation and animation of Timothy Q. Mouse including Fred Moore, Wolfgang Reitherman, and Ward Kimball. Edward S. Brophy was an American character actor, voice artist, and comedian; and he provided the voice for Timothy Mouse even though he was not credited in the film for the role.


Original Courvoisier Galleries label.

This cel is from the scene when the clowns are celebrating a successful fireman act with bottles of champagne. They come up with a new idea for their next act, and while they are running to tell their boss, one of them hits the table and a bottle of champagne falls into a water bucket. Dumbo and Timothy come along and end up drinking some of the spiked water and become drunk. As Dumbo blows some bubbles, both he and Timothy begin to hallucinate that the bubbles are transforming into elephants that begin to move. These colorful hallucinations dance around and begin to frighten Dumbo and Timothy. This is a very large and impressive original production animation cel of Dumbo and Timothy Q. Mouse, poking out from under Dumbo's hat, to look at the brightly colored "Pink Elephants On Parade." This sequence is one of the most famous in the film. Both Dumbo and Timothy Q. Mouse are eyes open and the cel image is a very impressive 14 1/2 inches long! A wonderful addition to any animation collection.

To see the cel in the film, just click on the short video below:

video

Original Production Animation Cels of Centaurs and Cupids from "The Pastoral Symphony" Sequence of "Fantasia," 1940


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cels of four Centaurs and four Cupids set on a lithographic background; From "The Pastoral Symphony" sequence of "Fantasia," 1940, Walt Disney Studios; Framed with a gold and silver frame, gold fillet, two linen mats, and plexiglass; Size - Image: 10 1/2 x 12 1/2", Frame 21 x 25".

To purchase these cels or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"The Pastoral Symphony" segment from Walt Disney's full length feature film "Fantasia," 1940 uses the 6th symphony in F, Op.68 by Ludwig van Beethoven as it's soundtrack. The symphony that Beethoven named "The Pastoral," is said to be one of the few pieces of music he ever wrote that tells a definite story. Beethoven was a great nature lover, and with this symphony he paints a musical picture of a day in the countryside. However, Walt Disney has taken Beethoven's musical score and set it as a backdrop to a fantastical mythological environment.


Close up of the original production animation cels of Centaurs and Cupids.

Disney's "The Pastoral Symphony" segment of "Fantasia" utilized expert color styling in order to depict a mythical ancient Greek world of centaurs, pegasi, the Gods of Mount Olympus, fauns, cupids, and other legendary creatures of classical mythology. The segment, directed by Hamilton Luske, Jim Handley, and Ford Beebe; tells the story of mythological creatures gathering for a festival to honor Bacchus, the God of wine.


Close up of the original production animation cels of Centaurs and Cupids.

In the prelude to the Bacchus festival, centaurs and centaurettes begin to congregate. The centaurettes spend time bathing and grooming before the appearance of the centaurs. After a while the centaurs and centaurettes begin to pair off, including the very beautiful Melinda (a blue with blonde haired centaurette with flowers in her tail) and Brudus (a purple and blue centaur with black hair). They are also serenaded by musical instrument carrying cupids, and are soon drawn to one another. Brudus kisses Melinda and they, along with the other creatures, walk hand in hand towards a nearby temple.


Framed Centaurs and Cupids original production animation cels.

Fred Moore, one of Walt Disney's most brilliant animators, supervised the animation of this scene. This is a fantastic multi-cel setup of four Centaurs and four Cupids. Original production animation cels from "Fantasia" are rare and this is great action filled scene, with all eight characters being full figure. A great addition to any animation collection.

To see these cels in the film, just click on the short video below:

video

Original Production Animation Drawing of Briar Rose from "Sleeping Beauty," 1959


Original production animation drawing of Briar Rose in graphite pencil from "Sleeping Beauty," 1959, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 62 lower right; Size - Briar Rose: 7 x 4 3/4", Sheet 12 1/2 x 15 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Sleeping Beauty," the 1959 Walt Disney full length motion picture, introduced two characters that would become universal favorites; Maleficent and Princess Aurora. Aurora, along with Snow White and Cinderella would be forever immortalized in the public's view as the three greatest Disney Princesses. The original design for Aurora and her peasant disguise Briar Rose was developed by Tom Oreb, who based the character on the famed Hollywood actress Audrey Hepburn; known for her thin frame and a very graceful demeanor. Marc Davis, the head animator, would continue the development process by morphing her general appearance and the clothing of the heroine. The fine tuning of the character continued so that she could be combined with the very angular forms present in the Eyvind Earle hand painted backgrounds.

As with other Disney films, an actress was hired as a live-action model (as a guide for the animators) for Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Helene Stanley, who was also the model for Cinderella in 1950, became the model for the heroine. It is interesting to note that prior to marrying Marc Davis in 1956, Alice (Davis) designed some of costumes worn by Stanley in her acting role in "Sleeping Beauty."


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Briar Rose.

In 1952, the professional opera singer Mary Costa, after meeting people at a party with her future husband director Frank Tashlin, auditioned for the part of Disney's Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Walt Disney called her personally within hours of the audition to inform her that the part was hers. The success of the film "Sleeping Beauty," owes a chuck of those accolades to the voice of Mary Costa. Her songs were some of the most beautiful ever sung by a Disney Princess. In November 1999 Mary Costa received the Disney Legends Award, and her hand prints are now a permanent part of the Disney Legends Plaza at the entrance to Walt Disney Studios.


Close up of the production number.

After Maleficent's evil curse that Princess Aurora would (before the sun sets on her sixteenth birthday) prick her finger on the spindle of a spinning wheel and die; the three Good Fairies disguise Aurora as a peasant named Briar Rose and hide her deep in a remote forest cottage. The majority of the movie focuses on Briar Rose, and this is a beautiful original production drawing of her. The drawing is used in the scene when Flora, Fauna, and Merryweather send Rose out on a task to pick a basket full of berries; so that they will be alone to make her a beautiful dress and an extra special birthday cake! The dialog for the scene is below:

Merryweather: "We want you to pick some berries."
Flora: "That's it, berries!"
Briar Rose: "Berries?"
Fauna: "Lots of berries."
Briar Rose: "But, I picked berries yesterday."
Flora: "Oh, w-we need more, dear."
Fauna: "Lots, lots more."
Flora: "Yes! Now don't hurry back, dear."
Merryweather: "But don't go too far."
Flora: "And don't speak to strangers."
Fauna: "Goodbye, dear."
All Three Fairies: "Goodbye! Goodbye! Goodbye!"

To view the scene which this drawing was used to create, click on the short video below:

video

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Original Production Animation Cel of Jiminy Cricket Set Over A Courvoisier Background from "Pinocchio," 1940

 
Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cel of Jiminy Cricket from "Pinocchio," 1940, Walt Disney Studios; Set over a Courvoisier air brush background; With original Courvoisier Galleries label; Size - Jiminy Cricket: 2 3/4 x 2 1/4", Image 4 3/4 x 4 1/2", Frame 12 1/4 x 11 1/2"; Framed with an acid free mat, wood frame, and plexiglass.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

Pinocchio: "What's a conscience?"
Jiminy Cricket: "What's a conscience! I'll tell ya! A conscience is that still small voice that people won't listen to. That's just the trouble with the world today..."

"Pinocchio," 1940 was the second animated feature film produced by Disney, and followed on the success of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." 1937. It was released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictures on February 23, 1940 and was based on the Italian children's novel "The Adventures of Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi. The general plot of the film involves an old wood-carver named Geppetto, who carves a wooden puppet that he names Pinocchio. One night the puppet is brought to life by the Blue Fairy, who informs him that he can become a real boy if he proves himself to be "brave, truthful, and unselfish". Pinocchio's journey to become a real boy is challenged by his encounters with an array of scrupulous characters.

"Pinocchio" became the first animated feature to win an Academy Award; it won for both Best Music - Original Score and for Best Music - Original Song for "When You Wish Upon A Star." Most critics and audiences agree that "Pinocchio" is among the finest Disney features ever made, and one of the greatest animated films of all time. In 1994, it was added to the United States National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."


Original Courvoisier Galleries label.

Due to the huge success of "Snow White," Walt Disney wanted more famous voice actors for "Pinocchio." He cast popular singer Cliff Edwards (who had made the first record selling over a million copies) as Jiminy Cricket. Disney also wanted the character of Pinocchio to be voiced by a real child. The role ended up going to twelve year old actor Dickie Jones, who had previously been in Frank Capra's enormous Hollywood hit, "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington."

Animation began in September 1938 and just as in "Snow White," live-action footage was shot for "Pinocchio" with the actors playing the scenes; which was supervised by Hamilton Luske. The animators then used the footage as a guide for their animation drawings by studying the human movement and then incorporating many of those poses and scenes. The title character was animated by Milt Kahl (initial design), Frank Thomas, and Ollie Johnston. "When I was doing Pinocchio," Johnston said, "I thought of the character being real, a living person, not a drawing."

Jiminy Cricket was animated by Ward Kimball, with Joe Grant working up early rough model sketches.  Kimball would go on to work on many characters for the Walt Disney studios, including the Mad Hatter and Cheshire Cat in "Alice In Wonderland;" however the great Disney animators Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston thought that Kimball's animation of Jiminy Cricket was "the most sincere he ever did."


Framed original production animation cel of Jiminy Cricket.

From veteran Walt Disney animator Andreas Deja:
"Ward Kimball surely was looking forward to animating Jiminy Cricket, after the bad experience he just had on Snow White. His brilliantly animated "Soup Eating Sequence" had been cut from the film, and now it was time for a fresh start on the next feature film Pinocchio. Even though Walt Disney personally assigned the Cricket to Kimball, the animator didn't seem to be able to please the boss with his initial designs. Not appealing, too grotesque and insect like! After many revised versions in which Ward de-insectified the design, Walt finally approved a design that though very appealing had very little to do with the anatomy of a real cricket."

This is wonderful framed original production animation cel of Jiminy Cricket placed on an original airbrushed Courvoisier background, with the original Courvoisier Galleries label verso. Jiminy is full figure, eyes and mouth open, and he is wearing his top hat, tails, and holding his umbrella. Just a perfect pose of one of the greatest Disney characters of all time! A great addition to any animation collection.

Original Production Animation Drawing of Pinocchio from "Pinocchio," 1940

 
Original production animation drawing in red, blue, green, and graphite pencils of Pinocchio from "Pinocchio," 1940, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 1A in pencil and production stamp lower right; Size - Pinocchio: 3 1/2 x 4 3/4", Sheet: 10 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Pinocchio," 1940 was the second animated feature film produced by Disney, and followed on the success of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." 1937. It was released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictures on February 23, 1940 and was based on the Italian children's novel "The Adventures of Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi. The general plot of the film involves an old wood-carver named Geppetto, who carves a wooden puppet that he names Pinocchio. One night the puppet is brought to life by the Blue Fairy, who informs him that he can become a real boy if he proves himself to be "brave, truthful, and unselfish". Pinocchio's journey to become a real boy is challenged by his encounters with an array of scrupulous characters.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Pinocchio.

"Pinocchio" became the first animated feature to win an Academy Award; it won for both Best Music - Original Score and for Best Music - Original Song for "When You Wish Upon A Star." Most critics and audiences agree that "Pinocchio" is among the finest Disney features ever made, and one of the greatest animated films of all time. In 1994, it was added to the United States National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

Due to the huge success of "Snow White," Walt Disney wanted more famous voice actors for "Pinocchio." He cast popular singer Cliff Edwards (who had made the first record selling over a million copies) as Jiminy Cricket. Disney also wanted the character of Pinocchio to be voiced by a real child. The role ended up going to twelve year old actor Dickie Jones, who had previously been in Frank Capra's enormous Hollywood hit, "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington."


Close up of the production stamp and the production number.

Animation began in September 1938 and just as in "Snow White," live-action footage was shot for "Pinocchio" with the actors playing the scenes; which was supervised by Hamilton Luske. The animators then used the footage as a guide for their animation drawings by studying the human movement and then incorporating many of those poses and scenes. The title character was animated by Milt Kahl (initial design), Frank Thomas, and Ollie Johnston. "When I was doing Pinocchio," Johnston said, "I thought of the character being real, a living person, not a drawing."

This is a spectacular drawing in red, blue, green, and graphite pencils of Pinocchio. He is full figure, eyes and mouth open, and with a very detailed face; including shading of his cheeks. A great addition for any vintage Walt Disney animation collection!

Original Production Animation Drawing of Bambi and his Mother from "Bambi," 1942

 
Original production animation drawing in red and graphite pencils of Bambi and his Mother from "Bambi," 1942, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 79 in pencil lower right; Size - Bambi & Mother: 4 3/4 x 3", Sheet: 10 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Bambi," 1942 is a full length animated film by Walt Disney Studios and based on the book "Bambi, A Life in the Woods" by Austrian author Felix Salten. The film was released by RKO Radio Pictures on August 13, 1942. "Bambi" received three Academy Award nominations: Best Sound (Sam Slyfield), Best Song (for "Love Is a Song" sung by Donald Novis), and Best Original Music Score. In June 2008, the American Film Institute presented a list of its "10 Top 10" (the best ten films in each of ten classic American film genres) and "Bambi" placed third in the animation category. In December 2011, "Bambi" was added to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress.


Close up of the Bambi and his Mother original production animation drawing.

The story centers on Bambi, a white-tailed deer, his parents (the Great Prince of the forest and his unnamed mother), his animal friends Thumper (a pink-nosed rabbit), Flower (a skunk), and his childhood friend and future mate, a doe named Faline. Walt Disney wanted all of the animals to be more realistic and expressive than those in "Snow White". He had Rico LeBrun, a wildlife animal painter, come into the Disney Studios to lecture to the animators on the structure and movement of animals. The animators went on excursions to the Los Angeles Zoo and Walt Disney set up a small zoo at the Disney Animation Studio with animals such as rabbits, ducks, owls, skunks, and a pair of fawns aptly named Bambi and Faline; so that the artists could see first-hand animal movement. Animator Marc Davis created the final design of Bambi by incorporating LeBurn's realistic study of deer anatomy but exaggerating the character's face by making his proportions baby-like; including a short snout and big expressive eyes.

"Bambi" was Walt Disney's favorite film he ever made, and it is not too surprising given his love of nature films. The special effects, particularly the water, and the lush hand painted backgrounds create a wonderful environment that allows the viewer to be totally immersed into the film. Combined with a great story of friendship and complete success in the creation of characters; the film is able to provide amazing feelings of both happiness and sadness, as the viewer watches Bambi grows up from fawn to deer.


Close up of the production number.

Although the character of Bambi was designed by Marc Davis; animation was accomplished by Frank Thomas, Milt Kahl, Eric Larson, Ollie Johnson, and Preston Blair. The voice of Bambi was provided by four different actors, corresponding to the different ages of Bambi as he grew older: Bobby Stewart (baby), Donnie Dunagan (young), Hardie Albright (adolescent), and John Sutherland (young adult). Donnie Dunagan was also the performance model for the character, with the animators integrating his facial expressions onto the face of Bambi.

This is a wonderful original production animation drawing of Bambi nuzzling with his Mother. Drawings from "Bambi" are much rarer than cels, and this is a great work that shows one of the main themes of the film; the love and protection of a Mother for her child. This would be a great addition to any animation collection!

Friday, June 17, 2016

Original Production Animation Drawing of Cinderella from "Cinderella," 1950


Original production animation drawing of Cinderella in red and graphite pencils from "Cinderella," 1950, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 35 in pencil lower right; Size - Cinderella 5 1/4 x 2 1/4", Sheet 10 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

The 1950 Walt Disney feature film "Cinderella" was based on the French version of the tale by Charles Perrault, entitled "Cinderella" and written in 1698. The film was the second in the series of great Princess films developed by Disney, the first being Snow White in 1937. The character of Cinderella is usually front and center in the pantheon of Disney Princess merchandise, perhaps because she is the only Princess not to be of a noble blood line who ended up marrying a Prince and becoming royalty.

Cinderella was animated by both Marc Davis and Eric Larson, however the two animators had different perceptions of the character, with Davis preferring elegance and Larson opting for simplicity. This actually worked in the film's favor, resulting in Cinderella being a much more complicated character than her predecessor Snow White. As with other Disney films, the studio hired actress Helene Stanley to perform the live-action reference for Cinderella. She would later return to the studio for the characters of Aurora in "Sleeping Beauty," 1959 and Anita Radcliffe in "One Hundred and One Dalmatians," 1961.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Cinderella.

According to Christopher Finch, from his book "The Art of Walt Disney":
"Disney insisted that all scenes involving human characters should be shot first in live-action to determine that they would work before the expensive business of animation was permitted to start. The animators did not like this way of working, feeling it detracted from their ability to create character. The animators understood the necessity for this approach and in retrospect acknowledged that Disney had handled things with considerable subtlety."

About 400 women and girls auditioned for the voice role of Cinderella, but the role ended up going to Ilene Woods. Woods, who at the time worked on the radio and did not know anything about the audition, was asked one day by her colleagues Mack David and Jerry Livingston to sing a song from Cinderella. Without her knowledge, her recording was given by her friends to Disney Studios. After listening to the material Walt Disney immediately decided that he had found the voice with which to speak and sing the character of Cinderella and contacted Ilene.


Close up of the production number.

This is a wonderful and very delicate production drawing of Cinderella. She is masterfully rendered in graphite and red pencils. Her eyes and mouth are open are her hands are visible in front of her. Eric Larson, one of Walt Disney's master animators known as his Nine Old Men, supervised the animation of Cinderella in this scene. The drawing is from the scene when Cinderella is in Lady Tremaine's bedchamber and the wicked stepmother scolds Cinderella after Gus the mouse was discovered hiding under a teacup. The dialog for the scene is below:

Lady Tremaine: "Now, it seems we have time on our hands."
Cinderella: "But I was only trying to..."
Lady Tremaine: "Silence!"

To view the scene which this drawing was used to create, click on the short video below:

video

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Original Production Animation Drawing of Pinocchio with Donkey Ears, Geppetto's Arm and Hand, and the Outline of Figaro from "Pinocchio," 1940


Original production animation drawing in red, blue, green, and graphite pencils of Pinocchio with donkey ears, Geppetto's arm and hand, and the outline of Figaro from "Pinocchio," 1940, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 126A in pencil lower right; Size - Characters 6 3/4 x 10 3/4", Sheet: 10 x 12"; Unframed.

 To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Pinocchio," 1940 was the second animated feature film produced by Disney, and followed on the success of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." 1937. It was released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictures on February 23, 1940 and was based on the Italian children's novel "The Adventures of Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi. The general plot of the film involves an old wood-carver named Geppetto, who carves a wooden puppet that he names Pinocchio. One night the puppet is brought to life by the Blue Fairy, who informs him that he can become a real boy if he proves himself to be "brave, truthful, and unselfish". Pinocchio's journey to become a real boy is challenged by his encounters with an array of scrupulous characters.

"Pinocchio" became the first animated feature to win an Academy Award; it won for both Best Music - Original Score and for Best Music - Original Song for "When You Wish Upon A Star." Most critics and audiences agree that "Pinocchio" is among the finest Disney features ever made, and one of the greatest animated films of all time. In 1994, it was added to the United States National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."


Close up of the original animation drawing of Pinocchio, Geppetto, and Figaro.

Due to the huge success of "Snow White," Walt Disney wanted more famous voice actors for "Pinocchio." He cast popular singer Cliff Edwards (who had made the first record selling over a million copies) as Jiminy Cricket. Disney also wanted the character of Pinocchio to be voiced by a real child. The role ended up going to twelve year old actor Dickie Jones, who had previously been in Frank Capra's enormous Hollywood hit, "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington."


Close up of the animation number.

Animation began in September 1938 and just as in "Snow White," live-action footage was shot for "Pinocchio" with the actors playing the scenes; which was supervised by Hamilton Luske. The animators then used the footage as a guide for their animation drawings by studying the human movement and then incorporating many of those poses and scenes. The title character was animated by Milt Kahl (initial design), Frank Thomas, and Ollie Johnston. "When I was doing Pinocchio," Johnston said, "I thought of the character being real, a living person, not a drawing."

This is a spectacular drawing in red, blue, green, and graphite pencils of Pinocchio with donkey ears and tail, Geppetto's arm and hand, and the outline of Figaro. The image is very large occupying the majority of the sheet. A great addition for any vintage Walt Disney animation collection!