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Saturday, May 21, 2016

Original Production Animation Cel of Timothy Q. Mouse On A Courvoisier Background from "Dumbo," 1941


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cel of Timothy Q. Mouse over a Courvoisier air brush background from "Dumbo," 1941, Walt Disney Studios; WDP stamp lower right; With original Courvoisier Gallery label; Size - Timothy Q. Mouse: - 3 1/2 x 3", Image 8 1/2 x 7"; Unframed.


“Dumbo, the 9th wonder of the 'univoise'! The 'woild's' only flying elephant!”
―Timothy Q. Mouse

The Walt Disney full length feature film "Dumbo," released in 1940, introduced to the world one of the greatest characters in the Disney pantheon, Dumbo the flying elephant! Dumbo was the only character in the film who never uttered a single word, and yet he is one of the most remembered Disney stars. All of his feelings were conveyed through body movements and facial expressions. The extraordinary animation skill needed in order to do this with a human, but in this case a baby elephant, can not be underestimated.


Close up of the Timothy Q. Mouse original production animation cel.

The Disney Studio animation artists were still fairly new to feature animation, having only started in 1937 with "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." The film prior to "Dumbo" was "Fantasia," with one of the most successful sequences being "Night on Bald Mountain." Here again, the main character Chernabog, a huge winged devil, sitting on top of a mountain, commanding the undead below, and never uttering a single word; made a huge impression on the viewing public.


Original Walt Disney Productions Courvoisier Galleries stamp.

The Disney animator Vladimir "Bill" Tytla created the devil-giant for "Fantasia's" "Night on Bald Mountain," and for the next film he was given the task of animated the film's star, Dumbo. He said: 

"I gave him everything I thought he should have," said Tytla. "It just happened. I don't know a damn thing about elephants. It wasn't that. I was thinking in terms of humans, and I saw a chance to do a chracter without using any cheap theatrics. Most of the expressions and mannerisms I got from my own kid. There's nothing theatrical about a two-year-old kid. They're real and sincere- like when they damn near wet their pants from excitement when you come home at night. I've bawled my kid out for pestering me when I'm reading or something, and he doesn't know what to make of it. He'll just stand there and maybe grab my hand and cry... I tried to put all those things in Dumbo."


Original Courvoisier Galleries label.

Certainly the greatest theme of "Dumbo" was the wonderful friendship between the mute baby elephant Dumbo and his unlikely friend, a mouse name Timothy. Various Disney animators were involved with the creation and animation of Timothy Q. Mouse including Fred Moore, Wolfgang Reitherman, and Ward Kimball. Edward S. Brophy was an American character actor, voice artist, and comedian; and he provided the voice for Timothy Mouse even though he was not credited in the film for the role.

This is a wonderful original production animation cel of Timothy Q. Mouse that was originally sold through Courvoisier Galleries. Timothy is eyes and mouth open, with his hand and index finger pointing up in the air. He has been placed on a hand airbrushed hay pile background, stamped with the WDP Courvoisier Galleries stamp. A great addition for any animation art collection and the cel comes with the original label, indicating that there were only 36 similar Timothy setups created.
 

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Original Production Animation Cel of Dumbo and Mrs. Jumbo from "Dumbo," 1941


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cel of Dumbo in his mother's (Mrs. Jumbo) trunk over a Courvoisier air brush background from "Dumbo," 1941, Walt Disney Studios; WDP stamp lower right; With original Courvoisier Galleries label; Size - Dumbo and Mrs. Jumbo's Trunk: 6 3/4 x 4 1/4", Image 9 1/4 x 7 1/2"; Unframed.


"Baby mine, don't you cry
Baby mine, dry your eyes
Rest your head close to my heart
Never to part
Baby of mine"

The Walt Disney full length feature film "Dumbo," released in 1940, introduced to the world one of the greatest characters in the Disney pantheon, Dumbo the flying elephant! Dumbo was the only character in the film who never uttered a single word, and yet he is one of the most remembered Disney stars. All of his feelings were conveyed through body movements and facial expressions. The extraordinary animation skill needed in order to do this with a human, but in this case a baby elephant, can not be underestimated.


Close up of the Dumbo and Mrs. Jumbo original production animation cel.

The Disney Studio animation artists were still fairly new to feature animation, having only started in 1937 with "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." The film prior to "Dumbo" was "Fantasia," with one of the most successful sequences being "Night on Bald Mountain." Here again, the main character Chernabog, a huge winged devil, sitting on top of a mountain, commanding the undead below, and never uttering a single word; made a huge impression on the viewing public.


Close up of the WDP stamp.

The Disney animator Vladimir "Bill" Tytla created the devil-giant for "Fantasia's" "Night on Bald Mountain," and for the next film he was given the task of animated the film's star, Dumbo. He said:

"I gave him everything I thought he should have," said Tytla. "It just happened. I don't know a damn thing about elephants. It wasn't that. I was thinking in terms of humans, and I saw a chance to do a chracter without using any cheap theatrics. Most of the expressions and mannerisms I got from my own kid. There's nothing theatrical about a two-year-old kid. They're real and sincere- like when they damn near wet their pants from excitement when you come home at night. I've bawled my kid out for pestering me when I'm reading or something, and he doesn't know what to make of it. He'll just stand there and maybe grab my hand and cry... I tried to put all those things in Dumbo."


Rare original Courvoisier Gallery Label.

"Baby Mine" is a song that is performed in the film "Dumbo," and has come to be the most recognized scene in the film. The music for the song was composed by Frank Churchill and the lyrics were written by Ned Washington. Betty Noyes recorded the vocals and the song is a beautiful lullaby that is sung as Dumbo's mother (Mrs. Jumbo), who is locked in a circus wagon, cradles her baby Dumbo in her trunk. The song was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song in the 1941 Oscars and is listed on AFI's "100 Years... 100 Songs" as one of America's greatest songs! 

This is an exception cel of Dumbo cradled in his mother's trunk, from the most recognized scene in the film. Dumbo is eyes and mouth open, and the cel is placed on it's original Courvoisier airbrushed background. In addition, the original Courvoisier label is included with states that only 33 of these "Baby Mine" setups were ever created. This is a rare and beautiful cel from the greatest scene in the film!

To see the cel in the film, just click on the short video below:

video

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Original Production Animation Drawing of Captain Hook from "Peter Pan," 1953


Original production animation drawing of Captain Hook in red, blue, and graphite pencils from "Peter Pan," 1953, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 122 in pencil lower right; Size - Captain Hook 11 3/4 x 7", Sheet 12 1/2 x 15 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"I'll get you for this, Pan, if it's the last thing I do!" - Captain Hook

The author J. M. Barrie first used Peter Pan as a character in a section of the adult novel "The Little White Bird" in 1902. He returned to that character with his stage play entitled "Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up," which premiered in London on December 27, 1904. The play ran until 1913, and it was later adapted by Walt Disney for the animated feature film entitled, "Peter Pan," in 1953.

Captain Hook was initially designed by Milt Kahl animated by legendary Frank Thomas and Wolfgang Reitherman. Hook voiced by Hans Conried who was also the voice of George Darling, which is consistent with the roles of "Peter Pan" for the stage. Conried was a well known actor including roles on "I Love Lucy" where he played an English tutor as well as playing the character Wrongway Feldman on "Gilligan's Island." His voice was so distinctive and so memorable that he was perfect for the role of Captain Hook; as he had a wonderful way of conveying both the rough gruff pirate role as well and the sly calculating villain.


Close up of the Captain Hook original production animation drawing.

From Disney animator Andreas Deja:
Many of you would agree that Captain Hook is one of Frank Thomas' best creations. To some Frank is the best animator who ever lived. - He used live action reference for a number of his characters. In this case it was character actor Hans Conried who provided the voice and acting reference for Hook. Frank was very critical about the way other animators used live action. To him the acting ideas were all you needed, but you still had to pass judgement on the footage and interpret what the actor gave you. His animation never has that roto, floaty feel to it. For one thing Frank was way too talented and smart to let that happen."


Close up of the production number.

Frank Thomas's first sketches of Captain Hook were much more menacing than the final product. Walt Disney felt the character was going to be too frightening for children and so Thomas toned down his drawings. The result is a wonderful character and certainly one the fan favorite male villains in the Walt Disney film world.

This outstanding animation drawing of a mouth and eyes open Captain Hook was created by Disney animator Wolfgang Reitherman who animated Captain Hook throughout the Skull Rock sequence. The drawing is from the scene at the end of Captain Hook's battle with Peter Pan inside of Skull Rock. The evil pirate is left dangling by his hook from the end of a rocky ledge, and Peter Pan says "Well, well, a codfish on a hook," and Captain Hook responds: "I'll get you for this, Pan, if it's the last thing I do!"

To see the drawing in the film, just click on the short video below:

video

Original Production Animation Cel of The Walrus and Oysters from "Alice In Wonderland," 1951

 
Original hand inked and hand painted production animation cel of The Walrus and Oysters set on a lithographic background from "Alice In Wonderland," 1951, Walt Disney Studios; Size - The Walrus and Oysters: 8 x 10 3/4", Image 10 x 12 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Now, if you're ready, Oysters, dear. We can begin the feed." - The Walrus

"Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" (commonly shortened to "Alice in Wonderland"), is a 1865 novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson who wrote under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. Disney reworked the story to fit with both a younger audience and a time frame suitable for an animated film (it's run time is only 75 minutes).

One of the most memorable segments of "Alice In Wonderland" were the two characters The Walrus and The Carpenter. Both of them were voiced by J. Pat O'Malley and they were animated by John Lounsbery, Ward Kimball, Wolfgang Reitherman, and Charles A. Nichols. They were originally created by Lewis Carroll for his book "Through the Looking Glass."

J. Pat O'Malley had a long history with voice work for Disney: he was the Cockney guy in the "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" sequence in "Mary Poppins," 1964, Cyril Proudbottom, Winkie, and a policeman in "The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad," 1949, and Colonel Hathi and Buzzie in "The Jungle Book," 1967. O'Malley performs all the character voices in the "The Walrus and the Carpenter" segment (besides Alice), including Tweedledum and Tweedledee, The Walrus, The Carpenter, and Mother Oyster.


Original production animation cel of The Walrus and Oysters without the background.

The Walrus and The Carpenter are two hobos whose story was told to Alice by Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum. The Walrus acts as the leader of the duo and in many ways he is like Honest John from "Pinocchio." They are both conniving moochers who will resort to trickery to get what they want. Finding a job and working is the last thing on The Walrus's mind, regardless of his constant ramblings of "cabbages and kings" (his way of saying that his future will soon be bright). He is also very greedy and tricks The Carpenter into leave the room so that he can eat all of the naive oysters (whom he had convinced to follow him ashore and into a restaurant that The Carpenter built out of left over remnants from a boat).

This is a wonderful cel of The Walrus and Oysters and it is from the scene that occurs just as The Carpenter, ready to start eating dinner, sits down at the table across from The Walrus. The Walrus asked The Carpenter for a loaf of bread (in order to get rid of The Carpenter) so that he would be all alone to devour the oysters by himself! The dialog for the scene is below:

Walrus: "Well, yes, yes, splendid idea, ha ha! Very good, indeed. Now, if you're ready, Oysters, dear. We can begin the feed."
Oysters: "Feed?!"
Walrus: "Oh, yes, the time has come, my little friends. To talk of food and things."

To see the cel in the film, just click on the short video below:

video

Friday, May 6, 2016

Original Production Animation Cel of Tramp and the Professor from "Lady and the Tramp," 1955

 
Original hand inked and hand painted production animation cel of Tramp and the Professor set on a lithographic background from "Lady and the Tramp," 1955, Walt Disney Studios; Size - Tramp and Professor: 5 3/4 x 4", Image 8 1/2 x 11 3/4"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"He's not my dog." - The Professor

"Lady and the Tramp" (released on June 22, 1955) is a full length featured animated film produced by Walt Disney and released by Buena Vista Distribution. The film was the 15th in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, and it was the first animated feature filmed in with the CinemaScope widescreen film process. The film was based on the story "Happy Dan, The Cynical Dog" by Ward Greene and tells the story of a female American Cocker Spaniel named Lady who lives with a refined, upper-middle-class family. Lady meets a male stray mutt named Tramp and they embark on many exciting and romantic adventures.

Initially Tramp was called Homer and although he was first conceived as Lady's suitor, he ended up as her ex-dog pound mate in the initial 1943 storyboard pitch. A few years after that version was scrapped, Walt Disney read a story called "Happy Dan the Cynical Dog" in Cosmopolitan Magazine and decided that this was they type of character that was needed to enhance the film. Although Walt wanted his new character to be called Tramp, the animators feared that audiences would take offense in such a name, due to the word's sexual connotations that had been popularized by the song "The Lady Is A Tramp." The animators first called the character Rags, then Bozo; before Walt insisted that that name Tramp would be acceptable.


Original production animation cel of Tramp and the Professor without the background.

Tramp is a very laid-back dog and acts more like a kid. He's flirtatious and has history of having had a multitude of girlfriends; and he's known for his street smarts, able to both avoid dog catchers and deal with junkyard dogs. However, he dreams about living with a family and in a loving home. Tramp was animated by Ollie Johnston, Milt Kahl, and Wolfgang Reitherman who animated the rat fight scene.

Larry Roberts (1926 - 1992) was an American voice actor and comedian who was most active in the 1950s. Although he was well known for his role in the 1950s TV series "Lights, Camera, Action!" but he is best remembered for his role as the voice of Tramp.

The Professor, voiced by Dallas McKennon, was seen in the film after Tramp whispers his plan to Lady about how they were going to sneak inside the zoo. Tramp whistles, barks, and leaps into the arms of the Professor. An Irish cop notices Tramp and reprimands the Professor for bringing his dog into the zoo, when a sign at the entry clearly says "No Dogs Allowed." The Professor says "He's not my dog," but the cop does not believe him; and while the two argue Lady and Tramp sneak into the zoo.

This is a wonderful full figure original production animation cel of Tramp in the arms of the Professor. Tramp has both his eyes and mouth open, and the cel is from the scene when he jumped into the arms of a very surprised Professor. A great addition to any animation collection!

To see the cel in the film, just click on the short video below:

video

Original Production Animation Cel of Br'er Fox, Br'er Bear, and Br'er Rabbit Set On An Original Production Background from "Song of the South," 1946


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cel of Br'er Fox, Br'er Bear, and Br'er Rabbit set on an original hand painted production background from "Song of the South," 1946, Walt Disney Studios; Courvoisier Setup with mat stamp lower right of the cel; Studio signed "Best Wishes Walt Disney" (presumably by Hank Porter); Size - Br'er Fox, Br'er Bear, & Br'er Rabbit: 6 x 7 1/2", Image 8 x 10", Frame 31 x 31"; Framed using a wood frame, two mats, wood fillet, and Museum Perfect UV glass.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Now look. I'm gonna knock his head clean off." - Br'er Bear 

"Song of the South" from 1946 is a live-action/animated musical film produced by Walt Disney and released by RKO Radio Pictures. It was based on the Uncle Remus stories collected by Joel Chandler Harris. Harris created the character of Uncle Remus in 1876 and began writing the Uncle Remus stories as a serial series to, in his words, "preserve in permanent shape those curious mementoes of a period that will no doubt be sadly misrepresented by historians of the future." President Teddy Roosevelt said of Harris, "Presidents may come and presidents may go, but Uncle Remus stays put. Georgia has done a great many things for the Union, but she has never done more than when she gave Mr. Joel Chandler Harris to American literature."


Original production animation cel and background with the signed mat.

"Song of the South" was Disney's first feature film using live actors, who provided a framework for the animated segments throughout the film. The character of Uncle Remus, who was presumably a former slave, was played by James Baskett. The film includes several folk tales of the adventures of anthropomorphic Br'er Rabbit and his enemies, Br'er Fox and Br'er Bear. The film's song "Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah" won the 1947 Academy Award for Best Song and is used often by both Disney and in popular culture. The film also inspired the Disney theme park water log attraction, "Splash Mountain."


Close up of the Walt Disney signature.


Close up of the Courvoisier stamp.

Because of the film's depiction of black former slaves and of race relations in Reconstruction-Era Georgia; the film has been controversial since its original release. A number of critics, both at the time of its release and in later decades, have described the film as racist. Consequently, "Song of the South" has never been released in its entirety on home video in the United States.


Framed Song of the South original production animation cel and background.

Br'er Bear is slow-witted (compared to Br'er Fox and Br'er Rabbit) and prone to violence when provoked. He is gullible which leaves him open to being tricked repeatedly by Br'er Rabbit, even when he accompanies the more sly Br'er Fox. Br'er Bear is a tall grizzly bear, with brown fur, a cream muzzle, large black nose, wearing a blue unbuttoned dress shirt, and a red fedora. He may be one of the most cruel and heatless of all the Disney villains. And, in referring to Br'er Rabbit, his most memorable quote is "I'm just gonna knock his head clean off!" Br'er Bear was animated by Marc Davis, Ollie Johnston, and Eric Larson and was voiced by Nicodemus (Nick) Stewart, who was an American television and film actor. Stewart was best known for his role as Lightnin' (Willie Jefferson) on the "Amos and Andy" television show.


Original production animation cel and background showing the entire background.

Br'er Fox is the fast talking sly fox who is always trying to trick and trap poor Br'er Rabbit. Br'er Fox has red fur, sharp teeth, a yellow-green hat, pale white shirt, and a forest green vest over a pair of green pants. In referring to Br'er Rabbit, his most memorable quote is ""I GOT 'im! I got the little rabbit! I sure's got 'im! Heh heh heh! I got the little rabbit this time for sure!" Br'er Fox was animated by Marc Davis and Ollie Johnston and was voiced by James Baskett; who also was the star of the film portraying Uncle Remus. In recognition of his warm portrayal of the famous black storyteller, Baskett was given an Honorary Academy Award; making him the very first black male performer to receive an Oscar.

At least a dozen different Walt Disney Studio staff members signed Walt Disney's name to a variety of items including: comics, fan items, and promotional materials. However, original artwork that was presented to VIPs was signed by an authorized individual; and Hank Porter was the first to be authorized to sign Walt Disney's autograph, instead of Walt Disney himself. The most common proxy signatures that exist on artwork are by Hank Porter in the 1930's & 1940's, and Bob Moore beginning in the 1950's. Hank Porter (1900 - 1951) was a member of Disney advertising artistic service that was part of the Publicity Art Department from 1935 to 1950. He made ​​adaptations, for the Sunday pages of American newspapers from 12 December 1937 to 24 April 1938, of several feature films including "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" and "Pinocchio."

Both David Lesjak and Didier Ghez have profiled Hank Porter on their blogs:
"Porter was a really interesting guy, and a wonderful artist. Porter was a staff artist of the Publicity Art Department from 1936 to 1950. He is the artist of the Sunday pages with the movie characters 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs' and 'Pinocchio'. 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs' appeared in the Sunday pages of the American newspapers from 12 December 1937 to 24 April 1938. Note that the actual movie wasn't released until 27 December, so the comic began its run prior to the film's release. His 'Pinocchio' Sunday ran from December 1939 to April 1940. The adaptations were written by Merrill De Maris and inked by Bob Grant. Porter also did several covers and illustrations for Mickey Mouse Magazine and Dell's Walt Disney's Comics and Stories. Walt also had Porter head up the World War II insignia unit, where in addition to supervising (and in many cases drawing) the more that a thousand insignia created by Disney, he also did a ton of other specialty drawing focused on the war effort."

This is perhaps one of the greatest original production animation cels that exists from "The Song of the South!" Br'er Fox, Br'er Bear, and Br'er Rabbit are full figure, eyes open, and Br'er Fox and Br'er Bear are mouth open showing their sharp teeth. Br'er Rabbit has a wonderful sly smile and the cel has been placed on an original hand painted production background. The original Courvoisier stamped mat has been Studio signed "Best Wishes Walt Disney" (presumably by Hank Porter). The dialog for this scene from the film is below:

Br'er Fox: "No! No! No! That's too quick. We're gonna make him suffer. ...an' I'm gonna do it the way I wanna do it."
Br'er Bear: "But... er..."
Br'er Fox: "Oh, I know that - Right in the back o'my little head I knowed what we gonna do...."    Br'er Bear: "Now look. I'm gonna knock his head clean off."
Br'er Rabbit: Go ahead, Brer Rear, ha ha... go on, knock my head clean off."
Br'er Bear: "...bu...hee...now.... see there."