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Saturday, April 30, 2016

Original Production Animation Drawing of Dumbo with Flag from "Dumbo," 1941


Original production animation drawing in red, green, blue, and graphite pencils of Dumbo with flag from "Dumbo," 1941, Walt Disney Studios; On five peg hole paper with production stamp lower right; Numbered 54 in pencil lower right; Size - Dumbo With Flag: 5 3/4 x 8", Sheet: 10 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"And now, I present to you the world's smallest little elephant, who will spring from this springboard in one spring to the top of the pyramid, waving his little flag for the grand climax! Ladies and gentlemen, I give you... Dumbo!" ― Ringmaster

The Walt Disney full length feature film "Dumbo," released in 1940, introduced to the world one of the greatest characters in the Disney pantheon, Dumbo the flying elephant! Dumbo was the only character in the film who never uttered a single word, and yet he is one of the most remembered Disney stars. All of his feelings were conveyed through body movements and facial expressions. The extraordinary animation skill needed in order to do this with a human, but in this case a baby elephant, can not be underestimated.


Close up of the Dumbo original production animation drawing.

The Disney Studio animation artists were still fairly new to feature animation, having only started in 1937 with "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." The film prior to "Dumbo" was "Fantasia," with one of the most successful sequences being "Night on Bald Mountain." Here again, the main character Chernabog, a huge winged devil, sitting on top of a mountain, commanding the undead below, and never uttering a single word; made a huge impression on the viewing public.


Close up of the production number stamp.

The Disney animator Vladimir "Bill" Tytla created the devil-giant for "Fantasia's" "Night on Bald Mountain," and for the next film he was given the task of animated the film's star, Dumbo. He said: 

"I gave him everything I thought he should have," said Tytla. "It just happened. I don't know a damn thing about elephants. It wasn't that. I was thinking in terms of humans, and I saw a chance to do a chracter without using any cheap theatrics. Most of the expressions and mannerisms I got from my own kid. There's nothing theatrical about a two-year-old kid. They're real and sincere- like when they damn near wet their pants from excitement when you come home at night. I've bawled my kid out for pestering me when I'm reading or something, and he doesn't know what to make of it. He'll just stand there and maybe grab my hand and cry... I tried to put all those things in Dumbo."

Certainly the greatest theme of "Dumbo" was the wonderful friendship between the mute baby elephant Dumbo and his unlikely friend, a mouse name Timothy. Various Disney animators were involved with the creation and animation of Timothy Q. Mouse including Fred Moore, Wolfgang Reitherman, and Ward Kimball. Edward S. Brophy was an American character actor, voice artist, and comedian; and he provided the voice for Timothy Mouse even though he was not credited in the film for the role.

In fact, none of the voice actors for Dumbo received screen credit. The pompous matriarch of the elephants was voiced by Verna Felton, who also voiced the Fairy Godmother in "Cinderella," the Queen of Hearts in "Alice in Wonderland," and Flora in "Sleeping Beauty." Other voice actors include Sterling Holloway as Mr. Stork, Cliff Edwards (better known as the voice of Jiminy Cricket) as Jim Crow, and John McLeish (best known for narrating the Goofy "How To" cartoons) providing the opening sequence narration.


Close up of the production number.

This drawing is from the scene in the film when Dumbo, the world's smallest elephant, is suppose to run out into the center ring and jump onto a string board that would catapult him high into the air, and landing on a small platform atop a pyramid of seven elephants. When the curtain opens and Dumbo hears the laughter of the audience he slowly begins to back up, and Timothy Mouse pricks him with a pin in order to get him to run towards the spring board. As Dumbo is running his ears, that were tied loosely atop his head, unravel and he trips; causing him to miss the spring board platform and instead hit the rubber ball that was supporting the pachyderm pyramid. As the elephants begin to tumble down, Dumbo with his flag still being held in his truck, has a look of surprise. This is a wonderful full figure, eyes and mouth open drawing from that sequence.

To see the drawing in the film, just click on the short video below:

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Saturday, April 23, 2016

Original Production Animation Drawing of Mickey Mouse and Pluto from "Society Dog Show," 1939


Original production animation drawing of Mickey Mouse and Pluto from "Society Dog Show," 1939; Graphite  and orange pencil on peg hole paper; Lettered JJ lower right; Size - Mickey Mouse and Pluto: 4 3/4 x 7 1/2", Sheet 10 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Pluto, the Skating Marvel." - Mickey Mouse

Society Dog Show (originally released on February 3, 1939) is a Walt Disney Company animated short film that was distributed by RKO Radio Pictures. It was directed by Bill Roberts and animated by Al Eugster, Shamus Culhane, Fred Moore, John Lounsbery, Norm Ferguson, and Leo Salkin. The short is notable in that it was the last appearance of Mickey's older dotted eye character design.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Mickey Mouse and Pluto.

The plot summary of "Society Dog Show" is that Mickey Mouse (voiced by Walt Disney) enters his dog Pluto in an upscale dog show. While Mickey grooms Pluto, Pluto starts swooning over Fifi the Peke who is flirting with him in an adjoining grooming station. Chaos erupts when Pluto, annoyed by all the prodding by the Dog Show Judge (voice by Pinto Colvig), attacks him. Mickey and Pluto are thrown out of the Dog Show and onto the street. Suddenly a fire breaks out in the building when the flash powder from a camera ignites some of the Dog Show decoratons. Pluto bravely goes into the burning building and saves Fifi. The final scene is when the Dog Show Judge places the "Public Hero #1" medal around Pluto's neck, and he shares a hug with Fifi!


Close up of the production letters.

This is a great drawing of Mickey Mouse and Pluto and "Gerry" Geronimi supervised the animation of this scene. In the short, Mickey straps roller skates onto Pluto's paws so that he can perform as "Pluto, the Skating Marvel." However, as they approach the stairs, they are pushed back by dogs and people fleeing a fire that was started by a photographer's flash bulb. This is just a wonderful action filled drawing with both Mickey Mouse and Pluto full figure, eyes and mouths open. A beautiful work that would be a great addition to any animation collection!

To see the drawing in the film, just click on the short video below:

video

Original Production Animation Cel Setup of Bambi and Fourteen Quail from "Bambi," 1942


Original hand painted and hand inked production animation cel setup of Bambi and Fourteen Quail over a Courvoisier air brush background from "Bambi," 1942; WDP stamp lower left, Single matted with a WDP stamp lower right and Walt Disney Bambi title lower left; Size - Bambi and Quail: 5 1/2 x 6 3/4", Image 7 1/2 x 10 1/4"; Mat 13 1/2 x 15 3/4".

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Good morning young prince." - Animals of the forest 

"Bambi," 1942 is a full length animated film by Walt Disney Studios and based on the book "Bambi, A Life in the Woods" by Austrian author Felix Salten. The film was released by RKO Radio Pictures on August 13, 1942. "Bambi" received three Academy Award nominations: Best Sound (Sam Slyfield), Best Song (for "Love Is a Song" sung by Donald Novis), and Best Original Music Score. In June 2008, the American Film Institute presented a list of its "10 Top 10" (the best ten films in each of ten classic American film genres) and "Bambi" placed third in the animation category. In December 2011, "Bambi" was added to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress.


Close up of the Bambi and Fourteen Quail original production animation cel setup.

The story centers on Bambi, a white-tailed deer, his parents (the Great Prince of the forest and his unnamed mother), his animal friends Thumper (a pink-nosed rabbit), Flower (a skunk), and his childhood friend and future mate, a doe named Faline. Walt Disney wanted all of the animals to be more realistic and expressive than those in "Snow White". He had Rico LeBrun, a wildlife animal painter, come into the Disney Studios to lecture to the animators on the structure and movement of animals. The animators went on excursions to the Los Angeles Zoo and Walt Disney set up a small zoo at the Disney Animation Studio with animals such as rabbits, ducks, owls, skunks, and a pair of fawns aptly named Bambi and Faline; so that the artists could see first-hand animal movement. Animator Marc Davis created the final design of Bambi by incorporating LeBurn's realistic study of deer anatomy but exaggerating the character's face by making his proportions baby-like; including a short snout and big expressive eyes.


Close up of the WDP stamp on the mat.


Close up of the Walt Disney Bambi title.

"Bambi" was Walt Disney's favorite film he ever made, and it is not too surprising given his love of nature films. The special effects, particularly the water, and the lush hand painted backgrounds create a wonderful environment that allows the viewer to be totally immersed into the film. Combined with a great story of friendship and complete success in the creation of characters; the film is able to provide amazing feelings of both happiness and sadness, as the viewer watches Bambi grows up from fawn to deer.

Although the character of Bambi was designed by Marc Davis; animation was accomplished by Frank Thomas, Milt Kahl, Eric Larson, Ollie Johnson, and Preston Blair. The voice of Bambi was provided by four different actors, corresponding to the different ages of Bambi as he grew older: Bobby Stewart (baby), Donnie Dunagan (young), Hardie Albright (adolescent), and John Sutherland (young adult). Donnie Dunagan was also the performance model for the character, with the animators integrating his facial expressions onto the face of Bambi.


Image of the entire Bambi and Fourteen Quail cel setup with the complete mat.

This is a wonderful original production animation cel setup of an eyes and mouth open, full figure image of Bambi; together with fourteen small quail. The cels have been placed on a Courvoisier air brush background, and the piece is matted with the WDP stamp lower right and the Walt Disney Bambi title lower left. A beautiful piece of animation artwork that is perfect for any collection!

#Bambi #Thumper #Disney #WaltDisney #MarcDavis #MiltKahl #animation #OllieJohnston #Faline #RicoLeBrun #animationdrawing #productiondrawing #animationart #untitledartgallery #cel #CourvoisierGalleries #CourvoisierGallery #Courvoisier #Owl #animationcel #SamEdwards #TimDavis #PeterBehn #FrankThomas #EricLarson #FelixSalten #SamSlyfield #DonaldNovis #BobbyStewart #DonnieDunagan #HardieAlbright #JohnSutherland

Friday, April 22, 2016

Original Production Model Animation Drawing Set of Lady Tremaine (Stepmother) from "Cinderella," 1950


Original production model animation drawing set of Lady Tremaine (Stepmother) in red, green, and graphite pencils; Head, Body, Hand, and Pillow; All from "Cinderella," 1950; All with production numbers and Disney stamps; Size - Overall image size of Lady Tremaine and Pillow: 7 x 8 1/2", Sheets 10 x 12"; Unframed.


"Often, patrons would be horrified or dismayed by the behavior of a villain, but more people actually hated the Stepmother more than any other villain we ever created." - Ollie Johnson and Frank Thomas from "The Disney Villain," 1993

Eleanor Audley (TV and film actress as well as familiar radio and animation voice talent) was filmed while she was dressed and speaking as the Stepmother; and as she performed scenes outlined in the film. Those film reels were used by animator Frank Thomas to convey even more realism to the character. Although the framed images were not directly copied by the animator, they were used as reference for lifelike movements. Eleanor Audley also voiced the Stepmother and her articulation conveyed the fire and raw power of the character. She could be sharp and curt in telling Cinderella what chores to do while lying in bed and slowly stirring her cup of tea, or her voice could be calm are cruel while watching as her daughters viciously destroyed Cinderella's dress.


Close up of the Head animation drawing of Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother)


Close up of the Body animation drawing of Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother)

Frank Thomas did a phenomenal job of controlling the Stepmother's actions to make sure that they were were not wild and out of control; but rather calculated, cold, and precise. The story of Cinderella presented a situation where a villain lived and interacted with her victim day after day under the same roof. The actions of the Stepmother seemed even more cruel because not only were both she and Cinderella animated in a very realistic fashion, but because of the close proximity the cruelness of the villain could be seen as even more intense by the reactions on Cinderella's face. If all this were not enough, the Stepmother's arsenal of evil was compounded by her two ill mannered daughters Anastasia and Drizella; as well as Lucifer the cat, who delighted in trying to kill Cinderella's mouse friends.


Close up of the Left Hand animation drawing of Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother)


Close up of the Pillow animation drawing of Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother)

These is an extremely rare set of four model animation production drawings of Lady Tremaine (The Wicked Stepmother) from "Cinderella," 1950. The drawings were created by a Disney artist for reference use in the Studio's Ink and Paint Department; and refer to one of the Stepmother's best scenes in the film. Lady Tremaine is lying in bed with her cat Lucifer and telling Cinderella, in a very sharp tone, what chores she should do; all the while pouring herself a cup of tea.

To see the drawings in the film, just click on the short video below:

video

Friday, April 15, 2016

Original Production Animation Cel of Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother) from "Cinderella," 1950

 
Original hand inked and hand painted production animation cel of Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother) set on a lithographic background from "Cinderella," 1950; Numbered 16 in ink bottom right; Size - Stepmother: 7 x 5 1/2", Cel 11 1/2 x 12 3/4", Image 8 3/4 x 11 1/4", Frame 21 x 23 1/2"; Framed using a silver and black wood frame, two silk mats, a silver fillet, and UV conservation clear glass.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Often, patrons would be horrified or dismayed by the behavior of a villain, but more people actually hated the Stepmother more than any other villain we ever created." - Ollie Johnson and Frank Thomas from "The Disney Villain," 1993

Eleanor Audley (TV and film actress as well as familiar radio and animation voice talent) was filmed while she was dressed and speaking as the Stepmother; and as she performed scenes outlined in the film. Those film reels were used by animator Frank Thomas to convey even more realism to the character. Although the framed images were not directly copied by the animator, they were used as reference for lifelike movements. Eleanor Audley also voiced the Stepmother and her articulation conveyed the fire and raw power of the character. She could be sharp and curt in telling Cinderella what chores to do while lying in bed and slowly stirring her cup of tea, or her voice could be calm are cruel while watching as her daughters viciously destroyed Cinderella's dress.


Original production animation cel of Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother).

Frank Thomas did a phenomenal job of controlling the Stepmother's actions to make sure that they were were not wild and out of control; but rather calculated, cold, and precise. The story of Cinderella presented a situation where a villain lived and interacted with her victim day after day under the same roof. The actions of the Stepmother seemed even more cruel because not only were both she and Cinderella animated in a very realistic fashion, but because of the close proximity the cruelness of the villain could be seen as even more intense by the reactions on Cinderella's face. If all this were not enough, the Stepmother's arsenal of evil was compounded by her two ill mannered daughters Anastasia and Drizella; as well as Lucifer the cat, who delighted in trying to kill Cinderella's mouse friends.


Close up of the Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother) cel.

 Framed Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother) cel.

This is a wonderful original production animation cel of the Wicked Stepmother, The Lady Tremaine. The cel is from the scene at the end of film when the Grand Duke and the Footman arrive at the Tremaine mansion with the glass slipper. First Anastasia tries on the slipper, but her foot is too large, and then Drizella attempts to put the slipper on and the dialog is below:

Drizella: "Oh, of all the stupid little idiots! I'll do it myself! I'll make it fit! There!"
Lady Tremaine: "It fits!"
Grand Duke: "It fits?"

This cel of Lady Tremaine occurs as she exclaims, "It fits!" Only to find out moments later that the glass slipper actually fits Cinderella.

Original Production Animation Cel of Winnie The Pooh from "Winnie the Pooh And The Honey Tree," 1966


Original hand-painted production animation cel of Winnie The Pooh on a lithographic background; From "Winnie the Pooh And The Honey Tree," 1966; Size - Winnie The Pooh: 3 1/2 x 2", Image 9 3/4 x 11 3/4"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE 

"Oh, bother!" - "Think, think, think!" - Winnie The Pooh

"The Many Adventures of Winnie The Pooh," 1977 was composed of a series of featurettes Disney produced based upon the Winnie-the-Pooh books by A. A. Milne. Walt Disney wanted to introduce the public to the Pooh characters slowly over time and the released featurettes include, "Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree," 1966, "Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day." 1968, and "Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too," 1974. For the full length film in 1977, extra material was added and used to link the three featurettes together. A fourth, shorter featurette was added at the end of the film and was based on the final chapter of "The House at Pooh Corner."


Close up of the original production animation cel of Winnie The Pooh.

Wolfgang Reitherman began working for Walt Disney in 1934, along with future Disney legends Ward Kimball and Milt Kahl. The three worked together on a number of early classic Disney shorts and Reitherman worked on Disney feature films produced from 1937 to 1981, including "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (animating the Slave in the Magic Mirror) up to "The Fox and the Hound," where he served as the co-producer for the film. Beginning with 1961's "One Hundred and One Dalmatians," "Woolie" (as he was called by friends) served as Disney's chief animation director.

One of Reitherman's productions, the 1968 short "Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day," won the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film. In addition, all three of Reitherman's sons — Bruce, Richard, and Robert provided voices for Disney characters. Bruce Reitherman was the voice for Christopher Robin in "Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree."


Original production animation cels of Winnie The Pooh without the background.

"Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree," 1966 is a film that combined live-action and hand painted cel animation. It was released by The Walt Disney Company, directed by Wolfgang Reitherman, and was based on the first two chapters of the book "Winnie-the-Pooh" by A. A. Milne. This was the only Winnie the Pooh production to be released under the supervision of Walt Disney before his death on December 15, 1966. Music and lyrics were written by the Sherman Brothers (Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman); with background music provided by Buddy Baker. Sterling Holloway provided the voice of Winnie The Pooh and Ralph Wright was the voice of Eeyore.

The cel of Pooh occurs in the film when a very hungry Pooh is kneeling outside of Rabbit's hole, wondering if Rabbit is home. Pooh is full figure, eyes open, and thinking.

Original Production Animation Drawing of The Girl Doll from "Broken Toys," 1935


Original production animation drawing of The Girl Doll from "Broken Toys," 1935; Graphite and green pencils on peg hole paper; Size - The Girl Doll on a Roller Skate: 3 1/4 x 5 1/2", Sheet 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.


"Broken Toys" is a Walt Disney Production Silly Symphony that was released in 1935. The film was directed by Ben Sharpsteen and written by Pinto Colvig, Otto Englander, and Larry Morey. The voice cast includes:  Sara Berner as the Girl Doll/Zasu Pitts Doll, Tommy Bupp as the Sailor Doll, Pinto Colvig as the W.C. Fields Doll, Lillian Randolph as the Mammy Doll, and Danny Webb as the Stepin Fetchit Doll.

The short opens with a trash truck dumping discarded toys into a junkyard, including a Toy Sailor Doll. The Sailor Doll encounters, in the junkyard, a large number of broken and discarded toys that that have lost all hope of ever being loved again. Refusing to give up hope, the Toy Sailor proposes they repair each other up. There are wonderful characters from the 1930's that were incorporated into toys including: Zasu Pitts, W.C. Fields, Mammy, and Stepin Fetchit. The animation from this short is exceptionally well done and memorable scenes include: the overweight Police Officer Doll giving the Zasu Pitts Doll a sawdust transfusion, the Stepin Fetchit marionette shining his head with shoe polish, and the Sailor Doll performing eye surgery on the Girl Doll; giving her a new pair of blue eyes. The Sailor and the Girl Doll begin to hold hands and fall in love. At the end of the film, all the repaired toys march to an Orphanage on their way to being loved again.

This is a wonderful original production animation drawing of the Girl Doll on a roller skate as she is being wheeled into the make shift Hospital, in order to receive her new set of bright blue eyes. Artwork from this film is rare and this is a very nice large image, from on the best scenes in the animated short. A wonderful addition to any animation collection!

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Original Production Animation Cels of The Seven Dwarfs: Dopey, Grumpy, Bashful, Doc, Sleepy, Sneezy, and Happy from "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," 1937


Original hand painted and hand inked production cels of all Seven Dwarfs: Dopey, Grumpy, Bashful, Doc, Sleepy, Sneezy, and Happy; Set over a hand painted Courvoisier background from "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," 1937; Size - Dwarfs: 7 x 10 1/2", Image 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

Development on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs began in early 1934, and by June Walt Disney announced to The New York Times the production of his first feature, to be released under Walt Disney Productions.  Before Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the Disney studio had been primarily involved in the production of animated short subjects in the Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphonies series.  However, Disney hoped to expand his studio's prestige and revenues by moving into features, and he estimated that Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs could be produced for a budget of $250,000 (this was ten times the budget of an average Silly Symphony).

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was to be the first full-length cel animated feature in motion picture history, and as such Walt Disney had to fight to get the film produced. Both his brother and business partner Roy Disney, as well as his wife Lillian attempted to talk him out of it.  The Hollywood movie industry mockingly referred to the film, while is was in production, as "Disney's Folly."  Disney ended up having to mortgage his house to help finance the film's production, which would eventually ran up to a total cost of $1,488,422.74; an absolutely massive sum for a feature film in 1937!

Although the initial concept designing of the dwarfs was relatively easy for the Walt Disney animation department, the actual animating of them proved to be difficult. The animators, already finding human figures difficult to animate, now had to animate dwarfed human figures. The great Disney animator Vladimir Tytla noted that the dwarfs should walk with a swing to their hips, and Fred Moore commented that they had to move a little more quickly in order to keep up with the other human characters. A 3-D armature sculpture of each dwarf was constructed as reference for the animators.

In the pre-production stages of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," Dopey was simply called 'The Seventh'. His personality and role were finalized late in the process, after it was suggested that Dopey should move like burlesque comedian Eddie Collins. Collins began his career in vaudeville and went on to become a successful comedian, actor, and singer. He helped to define the character's personality through his live action filmed sequences, as well as providing the few vocal sounds that Dopey made during the film. He also provided the sounds of a sneezing chipmunk and a squirrel.

Dopey is the youngest of the dwarfs, as proven by his lack of a beard. But perhaps his most notable trait is his lack of speech. In the film Happy states Dopey is simply unaware whether or not he can speak, as he has simply never tried. In spite of this, he can occasionally be heard making various vocal sounds such as whimpers, hiccups, and a one-shot yell. The other dwarfs seem to have no problem understanding Dopey, and Doc was able to easily translate Dopey's blathering into a cohesive sentence. Various Walt Disney artists were involved in the animation of Dopey throughout the film including: Vladimir Tytla, Fred Moore, Frank Thomas, Shamus Culhane, Les Clark, Ollie Johnston, and Art Babbit.

Grumpy was animated by Vladimir "Bill" Tytla, who also animated Doc. Tytla's Grumpy is the second most popular of the seven dwarfs, just behind Dopey.

From Disney animator Andreas Deja:
"Tytla animated 'from the inside out.' For every scene he did, he lived inside of that character. He drew absolutely beautifully, but bringing out  emotion and personality came first. Even if that lead to an off model drawing here and there. Walt had Fred Moore take a look at a few of Tytla's Grumpy scenes in order to punch up the 'charm level.'"

Bashful is very shy and coy, and he has a crush on the beautiful Snow White. His shyness prompts him to blush and he then covers his reddened face behind his hands and beard; which is often accompanied by giggles. Various Walt Disney artists were involved with Bashful's concept and animation throughout the film including: Vladimir Tytl, Fred Moore, Shamus Culhane, and Les Clark. The film and television actor Scotty Mattraw provided the voice for Bashful.

Doc was not present in the original November 1935 story outline of the film as referenced by Robert D. Field in "The Art of Walt Disney." However, several months later his role in the film and his relationship with Grumpy was well established. Walt Disney commented that Doc's flustered personality should be such that he never knew quite where he is without one of his fellow dwarfs reminding him. Radio comedian Roy Atwell, who used stammering and mixed-up language in his act, was chosen to be the voice of Doc. Various Walt Disney artists were involved in the animation of Doc throughout the film including: Vladimir Tytl, Fred Moore, Shamus Culhane, Les Clark, and Ward Kimball.

In order to establish Sleepy's character during the march home in "Heigh Ho", the animation director Vernon Stallings noted that traits specific to Sleepy should be taken into account. An early drawing by Albert Hurter of Sleepy with his mouth wide open in a yawn inspired the lead animator for the character, Fred Moore to be more extreme in Sleepy's animation. Moore made sure that, on every animation drawing of Sleepy, one eye was larger than the other; or one eye was more squashed than the other; in order to suggest the dwarf's perpetual sleepiness. Sleepy was voiced by the great Walt Disney voice actor, Pinto Colvig.

Due to Sneezy's severe hayfever, he sneezes very often throughout the film and this often prevents him from speaking. His sneezes can be gale force and will blow away anything and anyone in their path. As a result, the other dwarfs are quick to hold his nose whenever they feel he may have a sneeze approaching. The memorable scene in which the dwarfs tie a knot in Sneezy's beard was inspired by an early sketch by Albert Hurter, a concept and inspirational sketch artist at Walt Disney Studios. Various Disney artists were involved in the animation of Sneezy throughout the film including: Ward Kimball, Vladimir Tytl, Fred Moore, Shamus Culhane, and Les Clark. Billy Gilbert, an American comedian and actor known for his comic sneeze routines, provided the voice of Sneezy.

Happy is bubbly, bright, very friendly, and the most cheerful of all the dwarfs. His gleeful attitude prompts him to laugh often, and he is a singer, yodeler, and musician. Happy is plump and although six of the dwarfs have eyebrows that were modeled after Walt Disney’s; Happy has eyebrows that are white and bushy. Various Walt Disney artists were involved in the animation of Happy throughout the film including: Vladimir Tytl, Fred Moore, Shamus Culhane, and Les Clark. The former vaudevillian comedic actor Otis Harlan provided the voice of Happy.


Close up of the Seven Dwarfs Courvoisier cel setup.

The is an absolutely stunning original production animation multiple cel Courvoisier setup of all Seven Dwarfs: Dopey, Grumpy, Bashful, Doc, Sleepy, Sneezy, and Happy. It is extremely rare to all have all Seven Dwarfs in a single setup, and this would be the highlight for any animation art collection!

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