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Saturday, March 26, 2016

Original Production Animation Drawing of a Penguin from "Peculiar Penguins," 1934


Original production drawing of a Penguin from "Peculiar Penguins," 1934; Graphite pencil on peg hole paper; Numbered 461 lower right; Size - Penguin: 3 x 1 3/4", Sheet 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Peculiar Penguins" is a Silly Symphonies animated Walt Disney short film that was released on September 1, 1934 and distributed by United Artists. It was written by William Cottrell, directed by Wilfred Jackson, and with music composed by Leigh Harline. Inspiration for the film was undoubtedly Walt Disney's love of animals and of nature; a theme that he continued with throughout his career.


Close up of the Penguin original animation production drawing.

The story of "Peculiar Penguins" is set on an Antarctic island and follows a colony of happy go lucky penguins as they go about their mating rituals and day-to-day habits. One of them tries to impress his girlfriend by giving her an ice cream cone constructed of an icicle and snow balls. There are some great animated sequences, with the highlight being an underwater chase scene involving a very large and hungry shark. Of course, all the penguins manage to escape unharmed.


Close up of the production number.

This is a rare original production animation drawing of a Penguin. Artwork from this animated short film is rare, and this is a full figure, eyes open, beautifully rendered drawing; a great addition to any animation collection!

Original Courvoisier Production Cel Setup of Pinocchio, Geppetto, Figaro, Cleo, and Water Effects Cels from "Pinocchio," 1940

 
Original hand painted and hand inked production cel setup of Pinocchio, Geppetto, Figaro, Cleo, and water effects cels all over a hand painted Courvoisier background from "Pinocchio," 1940; Size - Pinocchio Geppetto Figaro Cleo & Raft: 8 1/2 x 4", Image 9 x 13", Frame 17 1/2 x 21 1/2"; Framed double matted, a gold wood frame, and UV conservation clear glass.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"A raft? That's it! We'll take the raft. And when the whale opens his mouth..." - Pinocchio

"Pinocchio," 1940 was the second animated feature film produced by Disney, and followed on the success of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." 1937. It was released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictures on February 23, 1940 and was based on the Italian children's novel "The Adventures of Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi. The general plot of the film involves an old wood-carver named Geppetto, who carves a wooden puppet that he names Pinocchio. One night the puppet is brought to life by the Blue Fairy, who informs him that he can become a real boy if he proves himself to be "brave, truthful, and unselfish". Pinocchio's journey to become a real boy is challenged by his encounters with an array of scrupulous characters.


Close up of the Pinocchio, Geppetto, Figaro, and Cleo original Courvoisier animation production cel setup.

"Pinocchio" became the first animated feature to win an Academy Award; it won for both Best Music - Original Score and for Best Music - Original Song for "When You Wish Upon A Star." Most critics and audiences agree that "Pinocchio" is among the finest Disney features ever made, and one of the greatest animated films of all time. In 1994, it was added to the United States National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."


Close up of the Pinocchio, Geppetto, Figaro, and Cleo original Courvoisier animation production cel setup. 

Due to the huge success of "Snow White," Walt Disney wanted more famous voice actors for "Pinocchio." He cast popular singer Cliff Edwards (who had made the first record selling over a million copies) as Jiminy Cricket. Disney also wanted the character of Pinocchio to be voiced by a real child. The role ended up going to twelve year old actor Dickie Jones, who had previously been in Frank Capra's enormous Hollywood hit, "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington."


Framed Pinocchio, Geppetto, Figaro and Cleo Courvoisier original animation production cel setup. 

Animation began in September 1938 and just as in "Snow White," live-action footage was shot for "Pinocchio" with the actors playing the scenes; which was supervised by Hamilton Luske. The animators then used the footage as a guide for their animation drawings by studying the human movement and then incorporating many of those poses and scenes. The title character was animated by Milt Kahl (initial design), Frank Thomas, and Ollie Johnston. "When I was doing Pinocchio," Johnston said, "I thought of the character being real, a living person, not a drawing."

"Pinocchio," was groundbreaking in the area of effects animation. The animators gave realistic movement to vehicles, machinery, and natural elements; such as rain, lightning, snow, smoke, shadows, and water. In contrast to the character animators, effects animators create everything that moves around the characters. Sandy Strother, one of the Disney effects animators from "Pinocchio," kept a diary about his year long animation of the water effects; which included splashes, ripples, bubbles, waves, and the illusion of being underwater. All of this attention to detail contributed to "Pinocchio" being one of the first animated films to have highly realistic effects animation. Ollie Johnston remarked "I think that's one of the finest things the studio's ever done" and Frank Thomas stated, "The water looks so real a person can drown in it, and they do."


Original Courvoisier label.

This is an absolutely spectacular multiple hand painted and hand inked original production cel setup of Pinocchio, Geppetto, Figaro, and Cleo. It is extremely rare to have multiple characters in a single frame, and this one has all four of the main characters and all are full figure. The cel occurs when all four of them are trapped inside of the whale Monstro. Pinocchio decides to create smoke from a fire in order to make Monstro sneeze; causing them and their raft to be shot out from inside the giant whale. A great action oriented image, with a full figure Geppetto hanging onto the back of the raft, a full figure and eyes and mouth open image of Pinocchio reaching for an oar, a full figure eyes open Cleo in her fish bowl, and a full figure eyes open Figaro the kitten. In addition, there are multiple water effects cels and all of the cels are place on a hand painted Courvoisier background. The original Courvoisier label is included.

To view this setup in the film, click on the short video below:

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Original Production Animation Drawing of Mickey Mouse from "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" Sequence of "Fantasia," 1940

 
Original production animation drawing of Mickey Mouse in red, yellow, green, and graphite pencils; Numbered 32A lower right, and used during the production of "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" sequence of "Fantasia," 1940, Walt Disney Studios; Size - Mickey Mouse: 5 x 5 3/4", Sheet 10 x 12", Frame 16 1/2 x 19"; Framed using an acid free mat, gold wood frame, and UV conservation clear glass.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"The Sorcerer's Apprentice" was initially going to be a "Silly Symphonies" short and be a venue for a comeback role for Mickey Mouse, who had declined in popularity. However, it was eventually included in the full length feature film "Fantasia," in 1940. The Disney version of "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" is based on the 1797 poem by Goethe of the same name. Mickey Mouse takes the role of the apprentice and the only real change from the original poem occurs when the Sorcerer is stern and angry with the apprentice after he saves him from a spell gone horribly wrong.


Close up of the Mickey Mouse original production drawing.


Close up of the production number.

In 1935 a young animator, born in Los Angeles, named Fred Moore gave Mickey his first makeover. Earlier animators had drawn the mouse as a series of circles, which limited his movement. Moore gave him a pear-shaped body, pupils, white gloves, and a shortened nose; all of which added to make the World's most famous mouse a lot cuter. Moore animated Mickey Mouse for the 1938 short "The Brave Little Tailor," which was to be the last significant appearance of the "pie-eyed" Mickey. For "Fantasia," 1940 the "pie-eyes" were gone and Moore's complete transformation of Mickey Mouse for the film continues to be his official look up to this day.


Framed Mickey Mouse production animation drawing from Fantasia.

"The Sorcerer's Apprentice," is perhaps Mickey Mouse's most well known role (despite the fact that he never utters a single word), and as such it was the only 1940 segment that was added to the later film "Fantasia, 2000." Original production drawings and cels of the character are extremely rare and highly collected and this drawing is a wonderful full figure, eyes and smiling mouth open image of the character. This drawing is from the scene when Mickey falls asleep and dreams that he has become such a powerful sorcerer that he can command the stars of the heavens. As he stands atop a high mountain he needs only to move his hands, in order to manipulate comets and stars. This specific pose of Mickey Mouse is iconic, and it is used by the Walt Disney Company in a very large number of promotional and merchandise products. The vast majority of the drawings and cels from this specific sequence are eyes closed, so this is a very rare find. Collectors rarely sell works of this quality, and this particular drawing has been in private collection for over 20 years!

To view the scene which this drawing was used to create, click on the short video below:

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Original Production Animation Drawing of a Mouse Orphan from "Orphan's Benefit," 1934


Original production drawing of a Mouse Orphan from "Orphan's Benefit," 1934; Graphite pencil on peg hole paper; Numbered 5 lower right; Size - Mouse Orphan: 2 1/2 x 2 3/4", Sheet 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.


"Orphan's Benefit" is an animated short film produced by Walt Disney Productions that was first released as a black-and-white cartoon in 1934. The film features Mickey Mouse and his friends putting on a Vaudeville-style benefit show for a group of unruly orphans. It features original music by Frank Churchill, was directed by Burt Gillett, and distributed by United Artists. The voice cast includes Walt Disney as Mickey Mouse, Clarence Nash as Donald Duck, and Florence Gill as Clara Cluck. The film was the debut of Clara Cluck who would go on to appear in six other cartoon shorts.

"Orphan's Benefit" was the first joint appearance of both Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse. Donald had previously appeared only in a single Silly Symphonies film. Although "Orphan's Benefit" was Donald's second appearance, the film was the first to significantly develop his character. Many of Donald's personality traits first seen in "Orphan's Benefit," would become permanently associated with him; such as his love of showmanship, his fierce determination, belligerence, and most famously his easily provoked temper. The film also introduced some of Donald's physical antics, such as his signature temper tantrum of hopping on one foot while holding out one fist while swinging the other. This sequence was the creation of animator Dick Lundy, who termed this Donald's "fighting pose." The great Walt Disney animator Ward Kimball said, "the reaction (to Orphan's Benefit) that came pouring into the studio from the country was tremendous. The kids in the theater loved or hated or booed Donald Duck." The overwhelming response of audiences to Donald Duck led him to be featured in future Disney cartoons.


Close up of the Mouse Orphan original production animation drawing.

Orphan's Benefit also represented a new direction for Disney film shorts, as noted by Disney historian Marcia Blitz: "It can be seen that the framework of "Orphan's Benefit" was traditionally slapstick. Audiences laughed at Donald's physical mishaps much as they laughed at Chaplin's or Keaton's. But in this instance there was the added dimension of Donald's abrasive personality. Surely nothing like it had ever been seen in a cartoon". Animator Ward Kimball who worked on the film called it a "turning point" for the studio, citing its extensive use of character animation which was used to physically convey personality.


Close up of the production number.

In 1989, an animation cel from "Orphan's Benefit," depicting Donald Duck being punched by an orphan, sold for $286,000 (then £174,390) at a Christie's auction in New York. Guinness World Records confirmed this was the most expensive black and white animation cel.

The opening of "Orphan's Benefit" has mice orphans arriving at a theater for a free show entitled, "Mickey's Big Show: Orphan's Benefit." As they file into the building they are given free lollipops, ice cream, and balloons. This is a rare original production animation drawing of one of the Mouse Orphans holding a dripping ice cream cone. A wonderful full figure, eyes and mouth image of an Orphan seated in the show theater.

Friday, March 25, 2016

Original Production Animation Drawing of the Pelican from "Mickey's Man Friday," 1935

Original production drawing of the Pelican from "Mickey's Man Friday," 1935; Graphite pencil on peg hole paper; Numbered 82 lower right; Size - Pelican and Rope: 3 1/2 x 10", Sheet 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.


"Mickey's Man Friday" is a Walt Disney short film, featuring Mickey Mouse, originally released on January 5, 1935. It was directed by Dave Hand and was animated by Johnny Cannon and Gerry "Clyde" Geronimi. The cartoon could be considered controversial today, because the native cannibals featured in the film are black caricatures and racial stereotypes.  The short was loosely based on the book "Robinson Crusoe" by Daniel Defoe, and was released to the home movie market under the name "Robinson Crusoe Mickey."


Close up of the Pelican original production animation drawing.

The story of "Mickey's Man Friday" is that Mickey Mouse finds himself stranded on an island. On the island, he runs into some cannibals that are about to cook one of their own. Mickey manages to scare them off and he saves the cannibal that was to be eaten. Mickey makes friends with him, gives him a top hat, and names "Friday." Mickey and Friday then get busy constructing a fort, in case the native cannibals return. The entire tribe does return and Mickey, together with Friday and a befriend pelican, hold off the cannibals by activating lots of booby traps that have been created along with the fort. The end of the film has Mickey and Friday escaping the island on a turtle powered boat.


Close up of the production number.

This is a very rare original production animation drawing of the Pelican, who assisted Mickey Mouse and his man Friday construct and defend their fort against the island cannibals. Original artwork from "Mickey's Man Friday" is very rare and this is wonderful full figure, eyes open drawing of Mickey Mouse's friend, the Pelican. He is flying with a rope linked to his beak and his throat pouch is filled with coconuts that he drops onto the invading cannibals. A great original production drawing from a rare black and white early Mickey Mouse film short.

Original Production Animation Drawing of Friday from "Mickey's Man Friday," 1935


Original production drawing of Friday from "Mickey's Man Friday," 1935; Graphite pencil on peg hole paper; Numbered 62A lower right; Size - Friday, Stork, and Thatch Roof: 5 1/4 x 7", Sheet 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Mickey's Man Friday" is a Walt Disney short film, featuring Mickey Mouse, originally released on January 5, 1935. It was directed by Dave Hand and was animated by Johnny Cannon and Gerry "Clyde" Geronimi. The cartoon could be considered controversial today, because the native cannibals featured in the film are black caricatures and racial stereotypes.  The short was loosely based on the book "Robinson Crusoe" by Daniel Defoe, and was released to the home movie market under the name "Robinson Crusoe Mickey."


Close up of the Friday original production animation drawing.

The story of "Mickey's Man Friday" is that Mickey Mouse finds himself stranded on an island. On the island, he runs into some cannibals that are about to cook one of their own. Mickey manages to scare them off and he saves the cannibal that was to be eaten. Mickey makes friends with him, gives him a top hat, and names "Friday." Mickey and Friday then get busy constructing a fort, in case the native cannibals return. The entire tribe does return and Mickey, together with Friday and a befriend pelican, hold off the cannibals by activating lots of booby traps that have been created along with the fort. The end of the film has Mickey and Friday escaping the island on a turtle powered boat.


Close up of the production number.

This is a very rare original production animation drawing of Friday, who is using a stork as a pair of scissors in order to trim off the uneven part of a thatch roof. Original artwork from "Mickey's Man Friday" is very rare and this is wonderful full figure, eyes and mouth open drawing of Friday in a great action oriented pose.

Original Production Animation Drawing of the Violin Princess from "Music Land," 1935


Original production drawing of the Violin Princess from "Music Land," 1935; Graphite pencil on peg hole paper; Numbered 5 lower right; Size - Violin Princess: 3 1/4 x 2 3/4", Sheet 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Music Land" is a Silly Symphonies animated Disney short film distributed by United Artists and released on October 5, 1935. It was directed by Wilfred Jackson, written by Pinto Colvig, and with music written by Leigh Harline.

The short is loosely based on Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet," and begins by showing a map of Music Land; before zooming in to show the Land of Symphony. The Land of Symphony is a classical music-themed kingdom, where the Princess (an anthropomorphized violin) grows bored with the slow ballroom dancing and sneaks out of the palace. Across the Sea of Discord is The Isle of Jazz, a jazz-themed kingdom alive with hot music and dancing. But the Prince (an anthropomorphized saxophone) takes little interest in the show and also sneaks away. 

The Saxophone Prince sees and falls in love with the beautiful Violin Princess, and soon war erupts when the respective leaders of the two Kingdoms find out what has happened. There are some wonderful animated sequences when both Kingdoms use music, played from their various musical instruments, as projectiles shot towards the rival Kingdom. The Prince and Princess are nearly drowned in the Sea of Discord until a cease fire is called. The short ends in a double wedding between the Prince and the Princess and the King and Queen; uniting the two Kingdoms with the creation of a Bridge of Harmony.


Close up of the Violin Princess original production animation drawing.

There is no dialog in the film, however each character "speaks" as a series of tones that correspond to the musical instrument on which they were based. In an attempt to bridge the gap between classical music and jazz, the short features music from Beethoven's "Eroica" and Wagner's "The Ride of the Valkyries"; as well as various popular, classical, jazz, and miscellaneous musical tunes.


Close up of the production number.

This is a very rare original production animation drawing of the Violin Princess from "Music Land," 1935. A beautiful full figure, eyes and mouth open drawing of the Violin Princess holding up her gown as she walks. Original artworks from this short is quite rare, and this is a great opportunity to acquire a gorgeous drawing perfect for any animation collection.

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

Original Production Animation Drawing of Mickey Mouse and Pluto from "Playful Pluto," 1934


Original production drawing of Mickey Mouse and Pluto from "Playful Pluto," 1934; Graphite and red pencils on peg hole paper; Numbered 42 lower right; Size - Mickey Mouse, Pluto, and Stairs: 6 x 8 1/2", Sheet 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Playful Pluto," 1934 is a Walt Disney black and white short film directed by Burt Gillett and starring Mickey Mouse and his dog Pluto. Walt Disney provided the voice of Mickey and Pinto Colvig was the voice of Pluto. Music was by Frank Churchill, Larry Morey, and Paul J. Smith; and the film was animated by Norman Ferguson, Dick Lundy, and Art Babbitt. The film stands out as being the first cartoon in which Pluto was developed as major character.


Close up of the Mickey Mouse and Pluto original production animation drawing.

The summary of the short is that while Mickey Mouse is working around his house, but his dog Pluto keeps bothering and interrupting him. Soon poor Pluto accidentally swallows a flash light and ends up getting stuck on a sticky piece of flypaper. These action packed scenes were animated by Norm Ferguson, who is noted for his significant contribution to the character of Pluto. The great Walt Disney animators Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston paid extensive tribute to Ferguson's work in their 1981 book Disney Animation: The Illusion of Life. They cited the famous "flypaper sequence" from Playful Pluto in which Pluto is stuck to a piece of flypaper as a: "milestone in personality animation...through it all, his reaction to his predicament and his thoughts of what to try next are shared with the audience. It was the first time a character seemed to be thinking on the screen, and, though it lasted only 65 seconds, it opened the way for animation of real characters with real problems."


Close up of the production number.

This is a great drawing of both Mickey Mouse and Pluto together on a single animation peg hole sheet of paper. The drawing is from the scene when Pluto has accidentally swallowed a flash light and is racing from the basement of Mickey's house, outside, and then back through the front door. Mickey is grabbing Pluto by the tail, trying to slow him down, and ultimately stop him. A wonderful and very action filled drawing from an early 1930's black and white Walt Disney short.

Original Production Animation Drawing of The Sugar Cookie Girl (aka Miss Bonbon and The Cookie Queen) from "The Cookie Carnival," 1935

 
Original production drawing of The Sugar Cookie Girl (aka Miss Bonbon and The Cookie Queen) from "The Cookie Carnival," 1935; Graphite pencil on peg hole paper; Number 159 lower right; Size - The Sugar Cookie Girl: 5 x 2 1/4", Sheet 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.


"The Cookie Carnival" is an animated short film produced by Walt Disney Productions and originally released on May 25, 1935. It's a "Cinderella story" involving a Sugar Cookie Girl who wishes to be queen of the Cookie Carnival. The story is a homage to the Atlantic City boardwalk parade and bathing beauty contests of the 1920s and 1930s; which would eventually became the Miss America Pageant.


Close up of the original production drawing of The Sugar Cookie Girl. 

The film was directed by Ben Sharpsteen, written by Pinto Colvig and Ted Sears, and with music written by Leigh Harline. It was animated by Paul Allen, Johnny Cannon, Ugo D'Orsi, Nick George, Ferdinand Horvath, Jack Kinney, John McManus, Grim Natwick, Milt Schaffer, Leonard Sebring, Fred Spencer, Edward Strickland, Frank Thomas, Don Towsley, and Bill Tytla.


Close up of the production number.

Pinto Colvig (most known as the voice of Goofy) provided the voice of the Hobo Gingerbread Cookie Man; and Marcellite Garner (most known for the voice of Minnie Mouse) provided the voice of the Sugar Cookie Girl, who would become Miss Bonbon and go on to win the title of Cookie Queen. Vaudeville was fading away by the time "The Cookie Carnival" made its debut in the theaters, but audiences at the time would have been familiar with theatrical stage acts performed by the different cookies and sweets showcased in the film. The rags outfit of The Cookie Girl is very similar and certainly was a precursor to Snow White, which would be released in just two years.

This is a very rare drawing of The Sugar Cookie Girl from "The Cookie Carnival," 1935. Any original artwork from this Disney short is extremely rare; and this is a wonderful full figure and eyes and mouth open drawing of the leading female star of the film. She is dressed in her rags outfit when she was first spotted, on the wrong side of the peppermint tracks, by The Hobo Gingerbread Man who ultimately transformed her into the Cookie Queen.

Original Production Animation Drawing of The Sugar Cookie Girl (aka Miss Bonbon and The Cookie Queen) from "The Cookie Carnival," 1935


Original production drawing of The Sugar Cookie Girl (aka Miss Bonbon and The Cookie Queen) from "The Cookie Carnival," 1935; Graphite pencil on peg hole paper; Number 249 lower right; Size - The Sugar Cookie Girl: 5 x 2", Sheet 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE
 
"The Cookie Carnival" is an animated short film produced by Walt Disney Productions and originally released on May 25, 1935. It's a "Cinderella story" involving a Sugar Cookie Girl who wishes to be queen of the Cookie Carnival. The story is a homage to the Atlantic City boardwalk parade and bathing beauty contests of the 1920s and 1930s; which would eventually became the Miss America Pageant.


Close up of the original production drawing of The Sugar Cookie Girl.

The film was directed by Ben Sharpsteen, written by Pinto Colvig and Ted Sears, and with music written by Leigh Harline. It was animated by Paul Allen, Johnny Cannon, Ugo D'Orsi, Nick George, Ferdinand Horvath, Jack Kinney, John McManus, Grim Natwick, Milt Schaffer, Leonard Sebring, Fred Spencer, Edward Strickland, Frank Thomas, Don Towsley, and Bill Tytla.


Close up of the production number.

Pinto Colvig (most known as the voice of Goofy) provided the voice of the Hobo Gingerbread Cookie Man; and Marcellite Garner (most known for the voice of Minnie Mouse) provided the voice of the Sugar Cookie Girl, who would become Miss Bonbon and go on to win the title of Cookie Queen. Vaudeville was fading away by the time "The Cookie Carnival" made its debut in the theaters, but audiences at the time would have been familiar with theatrical stage acts performed by the different cookies and sweets showcased in the film. The rags outfit of The Cookie Girl is very similar and certainly was a precursor to Snow White, which would be released in just two years.

This is a very rare drawing of The Sugar Cookie Girl from "The Cookie Carnival," 1935. Any original artwork from this Disney short is extremely rare; and this is a wonderful full figure and eyes open drawing of the leading female star of the film. She is dressed in her rags outfit when she was first spotted, on the wrong side of the peppermint tracks, by The Hobo Gingerbread Man who ultimately transformed her into the Cookie Queen.

Friday, March 18, 2016

Original Production Animation Drawing of Mickey Mouse's Donkey and Prince Dippy Dawg's (later named Goofy) Horse from "Ye Olden Days," 1933


Original production drawing of Mickey Mouse's Donkey and Prince Dippy Dawg's (later named Goofy) Horse from "Ye Olden Days," 1933; Graphite pencil on peg hole paper; Size - Mickey Mouse's Donkey and Prince Dippy Dawg's Horse: 4 1/2 x 6", Sheet 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE

"Ye Olden Days" (released April 8, 1933) is a black and white Walt Disney Company animated short film directed by Bert Gillett and animated by Johnny Cannon, Les Clark, Art Babbitt, and Norm Ferguson. It stars Pinto Colvig as the voice of Dippy Dawg (later renamed Goofy), Walt Disney as the voice of Mickey Mouse, and Marcellite Garner as the voice of Minnie Mouse.

The story of "Ye Olden Days" takes place in the middle ages. Mickey Mouse, the singing and lute playing wandering Minstrel, rides on his donkey and stumbles upon a castle. Inside the castle, the King is holding court, and Princess Minnie and Prince Dippy Dawg (later named Goofy) are about to marry. But Princess Minnie has second thoughts and ends up slapping the Prince. The King, angry over the incident, says to his Guards "Lock her in the attic!" Palace Guards lock Princess Minnie and her hand servant, Clarabelle Cow, in the attic. Minnie and Clarabelle start to cry and are overheard by Mickey, who is outside the tower window.

Mickey makes his way into the attic, through a window, and tells Minnie that he will save her. Mickey grabs Minnie and glides down a rope that was made from Clarabelle's clothing. As the pair make their way down the rope past a window, the King spots them and has them immediately arrested. The King threatens to chop Mickey's head off, but Minnie begs her father for forgiveness; because she has fallen in love with Mickey. 


Close up of the original production animation drawing.

The King then announces, "Clear the hall, we'll have a duel. The Prince shall battle this young fool!" Mickey and the Prince prepare themselves and their faithful steads for the duel. The duel begins between Mickey and the Prince and, when they both fall off their animals, a duel erupts between Mickey's donkey and the Prince's horse. Mickey's donkey bites the horse's bottom making him whinny and bump into a wall. A portrait of the King falls onto the horse, rendering him unconscious.  Minstrel Mickey eventually wins his duel with the Prince, who ends up falling out of a window. Then the Princess kisses her father the King, and goes off with Mickey. Both Mickey and Minnie sit atop Mickey's donkey as the crowd carries them outside. The film ends as Mickey and Minnie share a kiss, shielded behind a hand held fan.

This is an absolutely wonderful drawing of Mickey Mouse's Donkey and Prince Dippy Dawg's (later named Goofy) Horse from the black and white animated short "Ye Olden Days," 1933. It is rare to have more than one character on a single sheet of animation paper, and this is a fantastic image. This drawing is from the end of the film, when a duel erupts between Mickey's Donkey and the Prince's Horse. Both characters are full figure, eyes open, and this is a great action packed drawing. A beautiful and rare image from one of the early Walt Disney cartoon shorts.

Thursday, March 17, 2016

Original Production Animation Cel of Captain Hook On The "Jolly Roger" from "Peter Pan," 1953


Original hand inked and hand painted production cel of Captain Hook over a lithographic background of the deck of the "Jolly Roger" from "Peter Pan," 1953; Numbered 145 in ink lower right; Outer mat hand signed "Best Wishes Marc Davis"; Size - Captain Hook 8 1/4 x 7", Cel 12 1/2 x 16", Mat 16 1/4 x 20 1/2"; Triple matted, wood fillet, and inset plaque.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE 

"Blast that Peter Pan!"  - Captain Hook

Captain Hook was animated by legendary Frank Thomas and voiced by Hans Conried. Conried was also the voice of George Darling, which is consistent with the roles of "Peter Pan" for the stage. Conried was a well known actor including roles on "I Love Lucy" where he played an English tutor as well as playing the character Wrongway Feldman on "Gilligan's Island." His voice was so distinctive and so memorable that he was perfect for the role of Captain Hook; as he had a wonderful way of conveying both the rough gruff pirate role as well and the sly calculating villain.


Original production animation cel of Captain Hook.

From Disney animator Andreas Deja:
Many of you would agree that Captain Hook is one of Frank Thomas' best creations. To some Frank is the best animator who ever lived. - He used live action reference for a number of his characters. In this case it was character actor Hans Conried who provided the voice and acting reference for Hook. Frank was very critical about the way other animators used live action. To him the acting ideas were all you needed, but you still had to pass judgement on the footage and interpret what the actor gave you. His animation never has that roto, floaty feel to it. For one thing Frank was way too talented and smart to let that happen."


Close up of the production number.

Frank Thomas's first sketches of Captain Hook were much more menacing than the final product. Walt Disney felt the character was going to be too frightening for children and so Thomas toned down his drawings. The result is a wonderful character and certainly one the fan favorite male villains in the Walt Disney film world.


Image of the matting and Marc Davis signature.


Close up of the inset brass plaque and the Marc Davis hand signature.

This is a wonderful eyes and mouth open image of the vile Captain Hook. Both his hook and sword are visible, the cel is in mint condition, and his expression is absolutely fantastic! The cel has been placed on a lithographic background of the deck of Hook's pirate ship, "Jolly Roger." The animation setup has been triple matted with an inset title brass plaque. The outer mat is hand signed "Best Wishes Marc Davis" in black ink pen. A great addition to any Walt Disney animation art collection.

Original Production Animation Drawing of The Big Bad Wolf On His Polo Horse from "Mickey's Polo Team," 1936


Original production drawing of The Big Bad Wolf on his Polo Horse from "Mickey's Polo Team," 1936; Graphite pencil on peg hole paper; Size - Big Bad Wolf & Polo Horse: 5 x 7 1/4", Sheet 9 1/2 x 12"; Unframed.

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"Mickey's Polo Team," 1936 is an animated short film produced by Walt Disney Productions and released by United Artists. The film centers on a game of polo played between four Disney characters, led by Mickey Mouse; and four cartoon versions of real-life movie stars of the era. The cartoon also features cameos of many Disney characters from the Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphony film series, as well as several real-world 1930s entertainment figures. The film was inspired by Walt Disney's personal love of the game of polo, was directed by David Hand, and was first released on January 4, 1936. Walt Disney provided the voice of Mickey Mouse and Clarence Nash the voice of Donald Duck. Animation was accomplished by Art Babbitt, Johnny Cannon, Paul Hopkins, Dick Huemer, Grim Natwick, and Bill Roberts.

The story revolves around Mickey Mouse participating in a polo game, with a team that includes Goofy, the Big Bad Wolf, and Donald Duck. They are playing against Stan Laurel, Oliver Hardy, Harpo Marx, and Charlie Chaplin. All of the character's horses have the same features as their riders, except for Donal Duck who is riding a very uncooperative donkey and Harpo Marx who rides an ostrich. Jack Holt, the American actor most known for westerns, is the game's referee and throws out the ball which signals the beginning of the polo match. Oliver Hardy is quickly knocked off of his horse when the two teams battle to see who can get possession of the ball. The Big Bad Wolf takes the ball, but Charlie Chaplin soon steals it and hits it into one of the poles. Chaplin then uses his cane to turn himself around in order to go in the opposite direction. Meanwhile, Ollie is still struggling to get back on his horse. As Mickey hits the ball toward his home goal, Harpo Marx and his ostrich are forced to duck into the sand to avoid being hit.


Close up of the Big Bad Wolf original production animation drawing.

Ollie is finally able to get onto his horse but due to his size, the horse's body sags in the middle. In an attempt to make the horse stay up, Stan Laurel pulls Ollie's horse's tail out and ties it in a knot. However, the horse refuses to move and get back into the game; no matter how hard Ollie tries to entice it. Stan tries to poke it with a needle to make him move, but the horse takes off before he can do so; throwing Ollie off and having him get poked with the needle instead. In the game, the Big Bad Wolf takes the lead with the ball, but loses his mallet and ends up using his breath to make the ball move forward. On the sidelines, Shirley Temple and The Three Little Pigs make fun of him, and the Wolf gets angry and ends up blowing the fence in front of them away and showering them with dust. Donald Duck takes the lead and hits the ball, but Harpo Marx hits the ball back at him and the two end up colliding.

Donald yells insults at Harpo for knocking him off, but Harpo responds by punching him with fake boxers' mitts that were hidden in his clothes. The ball ends up landing next to Donald and he tries to hit it, but the team takes it away. Frustrated, Donald tries to get his donkey to move but it sits on him and begins laughing. The donkey then kicks him into the ground, the ball lands on his tail, and he is trampled by the other players (including Ollie, who finally manages to get back in the game). Donald throws a tantrum and accidentally swallows the ball, causing the teams to chase after him in order to retrieve it. Harpo hits him first using the head of his ostrich, and the Big Bad Wolf manages to briefly get the ball out by hitting him but it ends up bouncing back inside of Donald. All of the players from both teams try to hit Donald which eventually causes him to dig into the sand to escape. He tries to hide inside of a pole, but the teams continue to try to hit the ball out of him. Finally, Donald rips the pole off its base and leads both teams to collide. The end of the short has the horses riding their respective owners.

This is a wonderful original production drawing of The Big Bad Wolf carrying his polo mallet while riding on his horse. Both the Wolf and his horse are full figure, eyes open; and this is a rare and beautiful drawing from a early, fun, and comical Disney short.