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Thursday, June 8, 2017

Original Friz Freleng Signed Production Animation Cel of The Ant from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71


Original hand painted production animation cel of The Ant from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Signed Friz Freleng in ink lower center; Set on an original hand painted background with matching original hand painted overlay cel from "Snake Preview," 1973; Production numbers upper background edges; Size - Ant: 3 1/4 x 2 1/2", Image 9 3/4 x 12 1/4"; Unframed.


DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original Friz Freleng signed production animation cel of The Ant.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Close up of the original Friz Freleng signed production animation cel of The Ant.

Original production background without the cel.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

The Ant and The Aardvark cartoon shorts center on a blue aardvark (voiced by John Byner who was impersonating the comedian Jackie Mason) trying to catch and eat a red ant named Charlie (also voiced by John Byner but impersonating Dean Martin). The Aardvark's trunk sucking was the sound of a vacuum cleaner. The series was enormously popular, but only 17 shorts were every produced. Unique techniques were employed for the series, including making the Aardvark and his clothing (shorts and t-shirt) all one color blue; and the Ant was painted all red. This allowed for the two characters to clearly stand out on the brightly colored backgrounds. Another production element was the jazzy musical score that was directed by Doug Goodwin. He assembled a group jazz session musicians to perform the opening/closing credits and the musical cues; and for the first time in animated cartoon history all six of the musicians received on screen credit.

This is a large Friz Freleng hand signed cel of Charlie The Ant. He is full figure and eyes open; in addition the cel is set on an original hand painted background with matching original hand painted overlay cel from "Snake Preview," 1973 A very rare and beautiful piece of animation artwork, perfect for any collection!

Original Production Animation Cel of The Ant and The Aardvark from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71


Original hand painted production animation cel of The Ant and The Aardvark from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Aardvark: 6 3/4 x 3 1/2", Ant: 1 1/2 x 1 1/2", Image 9 1/4 x 12 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cel of The Aardvark and The Ant.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Close up of the original production animation cel of The Aardvark and The Ant.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

The Ant and The Aardvark cartoon shorts center on a blue aardvark (voiced by John Byner who was impersonating the comedian Jackie Mason) trying to catch and eat a red ant named Charlie (also voiced by John Byner but impersonating Dean Martin). The Aardvark's trunk sucking was the sound of a vacuum cleaner. The series was enormously popular, but only 17 shorts were every produced. Unique techniques were employed for the series, including making the Aardvark and his clothing (shorts and t-shirt) all one color blue; and the Ant was painted all red. This allowed for the two characters to clearly stand out on the brightly colored backgrounds. Another production element was the jazzy musical score that was directed by Doug Goodwin. He assembled a group jazz session musicians to perform the opening/closing credits and the musical cues; and for the first time in animated cartoon history all six of the musicians received on screen credit.

This is a wonderful cel setup of both The Aardvark and The Ant. Both characters are full figure and eyes open. A very rare and beautiful piece of animation artwork, perfect for any collection!

Original Production Animation Drawing of Mickey Mouse from "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" sequence of "Fantasia," 1940


Original production animation drawing of Mickey Mouse in red, blue, green, and graphite pencils, production stamp lower left, numbered 63 lower right, and used during the production of "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" sequence of "Fantasia," 1940, Walt Disney Studios; Size - Mickey Mouse: 4 1/4 x 4", Sheet 10 x 12"; Unframed.


"The Sorcerer's Apprentice" was initially going to be a "Silly Symphonies" short and be a venue for a comeback role for Mickey Mouse, who had declined in popularity. However, it was eventually included in the full length feature film "Fantasia," in 1940. The Disney version of "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" is based on the 1797 poem by Goethe of the same name. Mickey Mouse takes the role of the apprentice and the only real change from the original poem occurs when the Sorcerer is stern and angry with the apprentice after he saves him from a spell gone horribly wrong.


Close up of the Mickey Mouse production animation drawing.

In 1935 a young animator, born in Los Angeles, named Fred Moore gave Mickey his first makeover. Earlier animators had drawn the mouse as a series of circles, which limited his movement. Moore gave him a pear-shaped body, pupils, white gloves, and a shortened nose; all of which added to make the World's most famous mouse a lot cuter. Moore animated Mickey Mouse for the 1938 short "The Brave Little Tailor," which was to be the last significant appearance of the "pie-eyed" Mickey. For "Fantasia," 1940 the "pie-eyes" were gone and Moore's complete transformation of Mickey Mouse for the film continues to be his official look up to this day.


Close up of the production stamp.


Close up of the production number.

"The Sorcerer's Apprentice," is perhaps Mickey Mouse's most well known role (despite the fact that he never utters a single word), and as such it was the only 1940 segment that was added to the later film "Fantasia, 2000." Original production drawings and cels of the character are extremely rare and highly collected and this drawing is a wonderful eyes open image of the character. Mickey is full figure, wearing his robe and large shoes, and both of his ears are clearly seen. His arms are outstretched in front of him and there is a shadow cast on the floor to the left. A great addition to any animation art collection!

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Original Production Animation Cel of The Ant from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71


Original hand painted production animation cel of The Ant from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Ant: 1 3/4 x 1 1/2", Image 10 x 12"; Unframed.


DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cel of The Ant.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Close up of the original production animation cel of The Ant.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

The Ant and The Aardvark cartoon shorts center on a blue aardvark (voiced by John Byner who was impersonating the comedian Jackie Mason) trying to catch and eat a red ant named Charlie (also voiced by John Byner but impersonating Dean Martin). The Aardvark's trunk sucking was the sound of a vacuum cleaner. The series was enormously popular, but only 17 shorts were every produced. Unique techniques were employed for the series, including making the Aardvark and his clothing (shorts and t-shirt) all one color blue; and the Ant was painted all red. This allowed for the two characters to clearly stand out on the brightly colored backgrounds. Another production element was the jazzy musical score that was directed by Doug Goodwin. He assembled a group jazz session musicians to perform the opening/closing credits and the musical cues; and for the first time in animated cartoon history all six of the musicians received on screen credit.

This is a wonderful cel of The Ant; and he is full figure and eyes open. A very rare and beautiful piece of animation artwork, perfect for any collection!

Original Production Animation Cel of The Ant from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71


Original hand painted production animation cel of The Ant from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Ant: 1 1/2 x 1 1/4", Image 10 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cel of The Ant.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Close up of the original production animation cel of The Ant.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

The Ant and The Aardvark cartoon shorts center on a blue aardvark (voiced by John Byner who was impersonating the comedian Jackie Mason) trying to catch and eat a red ant named Charlie (also voiced by John Byner but impersonating Dean Martin). The Aardvark's trunk sucking was the sound of a vacuum cleaner. The series was enormously popular, but only 17 shorts were every produced. Unique techniques were employed for the series, including making the Aardvark and his clothing (shorts and t-shirt) all one color blue; and the Ant was painted all red. This allowed for the two characters to clearly stand out on the brightly colored backgrounds. Another production element was the jazzy musical score that was directed by Doug Goodwin. He assembled a group jazz session musicians to perform the opening/closing credits and the musical cues; and for the first time in animated cartoon history all six of the musicians received on screen credit.

This is a wonderful cel of The Ant; and he is full figure and eyes open. A very rare and beautiful piece of animation artwork, perfect for any collection!

Original Production Animation Drawing of J. Worthington Foulfellow (Honest John or The Fox) from "Pinocchio," 1940


Original production animation drawing in red, blue, green, and graphite pencils of J. Worthington Foulfellow (Honest John or The Fox) from "Pinocchio," 1940, Walt Disney Studios; Production stamp and numbered 53 in pencil lower right; Size - J. Worthington Foulfellow: 7 1/2 x 6", Sheet: 10 x 12"; Unframed.


"Pinocchio," 1940 was the second animated feature film produced by Disney, and followed on the success of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." 1937. It was released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictures on February 23, 1940 and was based on the Italian children's novel "The Adventures of Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi. The general plot of the film involves an old wood-carver named Geppetto, who carves a wooden puppet that he names Pinocchio. One night the puppet is brought to life by the Blue Fairy, who informs him that he can become a real boy if he proves himself to be "brave, truthful, and unselfish". Pinocchio's journey to become a real boy is challenged by his encounters with an array of scrupulous characters.

"Pinocchio" became the first animated feature to win an Academy Award; it won for both Best Music - Original Score and for Best Music - Original Song for "When You Wish Upon A Star." Most critics and audiences agree that "Pinocchio" is among the finest Disney features ever made, and one of the greatest animated films of all time. In 1994, it was added to the United States National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."


Close up of the original animation drawing of Foulfellow.

Due to the huge success of "Snow White," Walt Disney wanted more famous voice actors for "Pinocchio." He cast popular singer Cliff Edwards (who had made the first record selling over a million copies) as Jiminy Cricket. Disney also wanted the character of Pinocchio to be voiced by a real child. The role ended up going to twelve year old actor Dickie Jones, who had previously been in Frank Capra's enormous Hollywood hit, "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington."

Animation began in September 1938 and just as in "Snow White," live-action footage was shot for "Pinocchio" with the actors playing the scenes; which was supervised by Hamilton Luske. The animators then used the footage as a guide for their animation drawings by studying the human movement and then incorporating many of those poses and scenes. The title character was animated by Milt Kahl (initial design), Frank Thomas, and Ollie Johnston. "When I was doing Pinocchio," Johnston said, "I thought of the character being real, a living person, not a drawing."

Norm Ferguson (Fergy) was the animator responsible for bringing both J. Worthington Foulfellow (The Fox) and Gideon (The Cat) to life. Fergy is most remembered for his creation of Pluto, but his animation of both Foulfellow and Gideon was one of the true highlights of the film "Pinocchio." The inspiration for Foulfellow (also called Honest John) was the classic vaudeville acts; with the actor's overdone dialogue and skill at improvisations. Foulfellow was a very fast talking and persuasive Fox, who would not give poor Pinocchio time to think or respond before moving forward with his own plan to better himself, at the expense of his poor victim. Although dressed in a top hat, gloves, and a cape; all of his clothing is old, ragged, and with patches throughout.

Walter Catlett provided the voice of Foulfellow and endowed the character with a wonderful sophisticated style, that added to the level of sophistication to this petty criminal. Catlett had started is own career in vaudeville and new how to impart that style into his reading of Honest John. In addition, Walter Catlett's voice was also great for Fergy's animation; as it allowed for facial expressions and for mannerisms that enhanced the feel of Honest John. This combination was perfect and really helped in the development of a much more brilliant character, and one of the most entertaining in the film.


Close up of the production numbers.

This is a spectacular drawing of Honest John! The drawing is from the first encounter by Pinocchio with the fast talking Foulfellow; who when saying the word "theater," throws his cape dramatically behind him! A great addition to any animation art collection. The dialog for the scene is below:

Pinocchio: I'm going to school.
Foulfellow: School. Ah, yes. Then perhaps you haven't heard of the easy road to success.
Pinocchio: Uh-uh.
Foulfellow: No? I'm speaking, my boy, of the theater! Here's your apple.
[Hands Pinocchio the apple, eaten down to the core]

Friday, June 2, 2017

Original Production Animation Cel of Merlin from "The Sword In The Stone," 1963


Original hand painted production animation cel of Merlin from "The Sword In The Stone," 1963, Walt Disney Studios; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Merlin: 8 1/4 x 4", Image 9 3/4 x 14 1/4"; Unframed.


"The Sword in the Stone," 1963 is the 18th full length feature film produced by Walt Disney and it was released on December 25, 1963 by Buena Vista Distribution. The film was based on the novel of the same name, that was first published in 1938. It was later republished in 1958 as the first book of T. H. White's tetralogy "The Once and Future King." It was to be the final Disney animated film released before Walt Disney's death on December 15, 1966. The songs in the film were written and composed by the Sherman Brothers, who would become very famous for their future work on later Disney films including; "Mary Poppins," 1964, "The Jungle Book," 1967, and "Bedknobs and Broomsticks," 1971.


Original hand painted production animation cel of Merlin without the background.

Merlin is a very powerful wizard with a pet owl named Archimedes. He befriends and becomes the teacher of a 12-year old orphan named Arthur, who goes by the name of Wart. Merlin is first seen living in a forest cottage, and he believes in the philosophy of "Brain over Brawn." As a wizard, he is very intelligent, has a wide variety of powers, and is considered the most powerful wizard in the world. He has the ability to see into the future, and has the ability to shape-shift. Merlin was animated by Milt Kahl, Frank Thomas, and Ollie Johnston; and voiced by Karl Swenson who was an American theater, radio, film, and television actor.

This is a great cel of Merlin; he is full figure, eyes open, waving his staff over his head, and he stands over eight inches tall! A rare and wonderful cel of the great wizard from one of Walt Disney's most memorable contemporary films.