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Thursday, November 2, 2017

Original Production Animation Drawing of Briar Rose from "Sleeping Beauty," 1959


Original production animation drawing of Briar Rose in graphite pencil from "Sleeping Beauty," 1959, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 57 in pencil lower and upper right; Size - Briar Rose: 6 3/4 x 4 3/4", Sheet 12 1/2 x 15 1/2"; Unframed.


"Sleeping Beauty," the 1959 Walt Disney full length motion picture, introduced two characters that would become universal favorites; Maleficent and Princess Aurora. Aurora, along with Snow White and Cinderella would be forever immortalized in the public's view as the three greatest Disney Princesses. The original design for Aurora and her peasant disguise Briar Rose was developed by Tom Oreb, who based the character on the famed Hollywood actress Audrey Hepburn; known for her thin frame and a very graceful demeanor. Marc Davis, the head animator, would continue the development process by morphing her general appearance and the clothing of the heroine. The fine tuning of the character continued so that she could be combined with the very angular forms present in the Eyvind Earle hand painted backgrounds.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Briar Rose.

As with other Disney films, an actress was hired as a live-action model (as a guide for the animators) for Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Helene Stanley, who was also the model for Cinderella in 1950, became the model for the heroine. It is interesting to note that prior to marrying Marc Davis in 1956, Alice (Davis) designed some of costumes worn by Stanley in her acting role in "Sleeping Beauty."

In 1952, the professional opera singer Mary Costa, after meeting people at a party with her future husband director Frank Tashlin, auditioned for the part of Disney's Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Walt Disney called her personally within hours of the audition to inform her that the part was hers. The success of the film "Sleeping Beauty," owes a chuck of those accolades to the voice of Mary Costa. Her songs were some of the most beautiful ever sung by a Disney Princess. In November 1999 Mary Costa received the Disney Legends Award, and her hand prints are now a permanent part of the Disney Legends Plaza at the entrance to Walt Disney Studios.


Close up of the production number.

After Maleficent's evil curse that Princess Aurora would (before the sun sets on her sixteenth birthday) prick her finger on the spindle of a spinning wheel and die; the three Good Fairies disguise Aurora as a peasant named Briar Rose and hide her deep in a remote forest cottage. The majority of the movie focuses on Briar Rose, and this is a beautiful original production drawing of her. The drawing is used in the scene when Flora, Fauna, and Merryweather send Rose out on a task to pick a basket full of berries; so that they will be alone to make her a beautiful dress and an extra special birthday cake! The dialog for the scene is below:

Merryweather: "We want you to pick some berries."
Flora: "That's it, berries!"
Briar Rose: "Berries?"
Fauna: "Lots of berries."
Briar Rose: "But, I picked berries yesterday."
Flora: "Oh, w-we need more, dear."
Fauna: "Lots, lots more."
Flora: "Yes! Now don't hurry back, dear."
Merryweather: "But don't go too far."
Flora: "And don't speak to strangers."
Fauna: "Goodbye, dear."
All Three Fairies: "Goodbye! Goodbye! Goodbye!"

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Original Production Animation Drawing of Briar Rose from "Sleeping Beauty," 1959


Original production animation drawing of Briar Rose in graphite pencil from "Sleeping Beauty," 1959, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 53 in pencil lower and upper right; Size - Briar Rose: 6 3/4 x 4 3/4", Sheet 12 1/2 x 15 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Sleeping Beauty," the 1959 Walt Disney full length motion picture, introduced two characters that would become universal favorites; Maleficent and Princess Aurora. Aurora, along with Snow White and Cinderella would be forever immortalized in the public's view as the three greatest Disney Princesses. The original design for Aurora and her peasant disguise Briar Rose was developed by Tom Oreb, who based the character on the famed Hollywood actress Audrey Hepburn; known for her thin frame and a very graceful demeanor. Marc Davis, the head animator, would continue the development process by morphing her general appearance and the clothing of the heroine. The fine tuning of the character continued so that she could be combined with the very angular forms present in the Eyvind Earle hand painted backgrounds.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Briar Rose.

As with other Disney films, an actress was hired as a live-action model (as a guide for the animators) for Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Helene Stanley, who was also the model for Cinderella in 1950, became the model for the heroine. It is interesting to note that prior to marrying Marc Davis in 1956, Alice (Davis) designed some of costumes worn by Stanley in her acting role in "Sleeping Beauty."

In 1952, the professional opera singer Mary Costa, after meeting people at a party with her future husband director Frank Tashlin, auditioned for the part of Disney's Princess Aurora/Briar Rose. Walt Disney called her personally within hours of the audition to inform her that the part was hers. The success of the film "Sleeping Beauty," owes a chuck of those accolades to the voice of Mary Costa. Her songs were some of the most beautiful ever sung by a Disney Princess. In November 1999 Mary Costa received the Disney Legends Award, and her hand prints are now a permanent part of the Disney Legends Plaza at the entrance to Walt Disney Studios.


Close up of the production number.

After Maleficent's evil curse that Princess Aurora would (before the sun sets on her sixteenth birthday) prick her finger on the spindle of a spinning wheel and die; the three Good Fairies disguise Aurora as a peasant named Briar Rose and hide her deep in a remote forest cottage. The majority of the movie focuses on Briar Rose, and this is a beautiful original production drawing of her. The drawing is used in the scene when Flora, Fauna, and Merryweather send Rose out on a task to pick a basket full of berries; so that they will be alone to make her a beautiful dress and an extra special birthday cake! The dialog for the scene is below:

Merryweather: "We want you to pick some berries."
Flora: "That's it, berries!"
Briar Rose: "Berries?"
Fauna: "Lots of berries."
Briar Rose: "But, I picked berries yesterday."
Flora: "Oh, w-we need more, dear."
Fauna: "Lots, lots more."
Flora: "Yes! Now don't hurry back, dear."
Merryweather: "But don't go too far."
Flora: "And don't speak to strangers."
Fauna: "Goodbye, dear."
All Three Fairies: "Goodbye! Goodbye! Goodbye!"

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Original Production Animation Cel of Jessica Rabbit from "Who Framed Roger Rabbit?," 1988


Original hand painted production animation cel of Jessica Rabbit from "Who Framed Roger Rabbit?," 1988, Walt Disney Studios; Set on a lithographic background; Walt Disney Company Seal lower left and with original Walt Disney Company Certificate; Size - Jessica Rabbit: 7 x 2 1/4", Image 10 1/2 x 15 1/2", Mat 17 x 22"; Triple matted.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"I'm not bad, I'm just drawn that way." - Jessica Rabbit

"Who Framed Roger Rabbit," 1988 is a Walt Disney live-action/animated fantasy featured film that was released on June 22, 1988. The film was produced by Frank Marshall and Robert Watts, written by Jeffrey Price and Peter S. Seaman, and is based on Gary K. Wolf's 1981 novel "Who Censored Roger Rabbit?" The film stars Bob Hoskins, Christopher Lloyd, Charles Fleischer, Stubby Kaye, and Joanne Cassidy. Combining live-action with animation, the story follows a private detective, Eddie Valiant, who must exonerate "Toon" Roger Rabbit who is accused of murdering a wealthy businessman. The film was a blockbuster and critical success wining three Academy Awards and a Special Achievement Award. The film grossed $329,803,958 in 1988, and at the time of release was the twentieth highest grossing film of all time. In 2016 the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

Walt Disney Pictures purchased the film rights for "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" in 1981 and in 1985 the project was revamped by Michael Eisner, the new CEO of Disney. Eisner brought in executive producer Steven Spielberg and his production company Amblin Entertainment. Spielberg convinced Warner Bros., Fleischer Studios, King Features Syndicate, Felix the Cat Productions, Turner Entertainment, and Universal Pictures/Walter Lantz Productions to "lend" their character to appear in the film; although many had stipulations were added about how the characters could be portrayed. For example Disney's Donald Duck and Warner Bros. Daffy Duck would appear as equally-talented dueling pianists; and Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny would also share equal time for their first ever animated screen scene together. Spielberg's negotiations contributed to audience admiration for the film because of a large number of famous animated characters appearing together for the first time. The cast of characters, combined with brilliant animation that was integrated with seamless live action, made the film a visual masterpiece!


Close up of the Jessica Rabbit original production animation cel.


Close up of The Walt Disney Company Seal.


Original Walt Disney certificate of authenticity.

The breakout character of the film was Jessica Rabbit, Roger's beautiful and seductive "Toon" wife. Jessica was animated by Walt Disney supervising animator Richard Williams and by James Baxter; and Kathleen Turner provided the voice of the character, but was uncredited in the film. Amy Irving supplied Jessica's singing voice and Betsy Brantley was the live actress stand-in. Jessica Rabbit was an incredible mix of cartoon and realism that merged in the creation of a modern femme fatale, who captivated male viewers all over the world!


Triple matted Jessica Rabbit original production animation cel.

Jessica Rabbit first appears in the film when she performs the song "Why Don't You Do Right?" at the "Ink and Paint Club." The name of the club is derived from the Ink and Paint Department of Walt Disney Animation Studios, where all the inking and painting of animation cels occurs. This is a fantastic original production animation cel of Jessica from that opening sequence. It really just doesn't get any better, as she is full figure and eyes and mouth open. A spectacular image that is perfect for any Walt Disney animation art collection!

Original Production Animation Drawing of The Genie from "Aladdin," 1992


Original production animation drawing of The Genie in graphite and blue pencils on peg hole paper from "Aladdin," 1992, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 43 lower right; Size - Genie: 8 1/4 x 9 1/2", Sheet 12 1/2 x 17"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"What would you wish of me: The ever-impressive, the long-contained, the often imitated, but never duplicated... Genie of the Lamp!" - The Genie

"Aladdin," 1992 is a Walt Disney animated musical fantasy featured film that was released on November 25, 1992. The film was directed by John Musker and Ron Clements, and is based on the Arab-style folktale of Aladdin and the Magic Lamp from "One Thousand and One Nights." "Aladdin" won two Academy Awards; one for Best Music, Original Song Alan Menken (music), Tim Rice (lyrics), for the song "A Whole New World," and the second for Best Music, Original Score, Alan Menken. The voice cast featureed Scott Weinger as Aladdin, Robin Williams as the Genie, Linda Larkin as Princess Jasmine, Jonathan Freeman as Jafar, Frank Welker as Abu, Gilbert Gottfried as Iago, and Douglas Seale as The Sultan.


Close up of The Genie original production animation drawing.


Close up of the production number.

The Genie was brilliantly animated by Eric Goldberg; who is an American voice actor, animator, and film director who worked for Walt Disney and Warner Bros Animation Studios. The critical success and the public admiration for the character was no doubt due to the amazing voice work of comedian Robin Williams. Williams was known for his spontaneity, comic improvisational, and impression skills; all of which were integrated into the character. During the voice recorded sessions, it is estimated that Williams improvised 52 characters. Goldberg reviewed the recorded dialogue and selected the best gags and lines. Then he and his team created animation to match Williams' jokes, puns, and impersonations.

This is a fantastic original production drawing of The Genie. He is eyes and mouth open and the drawing is very large, expressive, and action filled; perfect for any Disney animation art collection!

Original Production Animation Cel of Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother) from "Cinderella," 1950


Original hand inked and hand painted production animation cel of Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother) set on a lithographic background from "Cinderella," 1950, Walt Disney Studios; Production numbers in ink lower cel edge; Size - Stepmother: 6 1/2 x 5", Image 7 3/4 x 10"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Often, patrons would be horrified or dismayed by the behavior of a villain, but more people actually hated the Stepmother more than any other villain we ever created." - Ollie Johnson and Frank Thomas from "The Disney Villain," 1993

The 1950 Walt Disney feature film "Cinderella" was based on the French version of the tale by Charles Perrault, entitled "Cinderella" and written in 1698. The film was the second in the series of great Princess films developed by Disney, the first being Snow White in 1937. The character of Cinderella is usually front and center in the pantheon of Disney Princess merchandise, perhaps because she is the only Princess not to be of a noble blood line who ended up marrying a Prince and becoming royalty.

Eleanor Audley (TV and film actress as well as familiar radio and animation voice talent) was filmed while she was dressed and speaking as the Stepmother; and as she performed scenes outlined in the film. Those film reels were used by animator Frank Thomas to convey even more realism to the character. Although the framed images were not directly copied by the animator, they were used as reference for lifelike movements. Eleanor Audley also voiced the Stepmother and her articulation conveyed the fire and raw power of the character. She could be sharp and curt in telling Cinderella what chores to do while lying in bed and slowly stirring her cup of tea, or her voice could be calm are cruel while watching as her daughters viciously destroyed Cinderella's dress.


Original production animation cel of Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother).

Close up of the production numbers.

Frank Thomas did a phenomenal job of controlling the Stepmother's actions to make sure that they were were not wild and out of control; but rather calculated, cold, and precise. The story of Cinderella presented a situation where a villain lived and interacted with her victim day after day under the same roof. The actions of the Stepmother seemed even more cruel because not only were both she and Cinderella animated in a very realistic fashion, but because of the close proximity the cruelness of the villain could be seen as even more intense by the reactions on Cinderella's face. If all this were not enough, the Stepmother's arsenal of evil was compounded by her two ill mannered daughters Anastasia and Drizella; as well as Lucifer the cat, who delighted in trying to kill Cinderella's mouse friends.

This cel is from the very famous scene when Cinderella, wearing the pink dress that was made for her by her mice and bird friends, races down the stairs just as Tremaine and her two daughter are leaving for the Ball. Lady Tremaine realizes that the dress is composed of elements from her daughters Anastasia's and Drizella's wardrobes. When the Stepmother points this out, both Anastasia and Drizella tear Cinderella's dress apart. As Cinderella stands there in the foyer in tattered rags, Lady Tremaine says, "Girls, girls. That's quite enough. Hurry along, now, both of you. I won't have you upsetting yourselves." The Stepmother takes one look at Cinderella before leaving and says simply, "Good night" while she opened and then closed the front door, as she and her two daughters leave for the Ball. A great piece of vintage Walt Disney animation artwork from the full length masterpiece "Cinderella!"

Friday, October 27, 2017

Original Production Animation Cel of Lucifer from "Cinderella," 1950


Original hand inked and hand painted production animation cel of Lucifer set on a lithographic background from "Cinderella," 1950, Walt Disney Studios; Size - Lucifer 5 1/2 x 3 1/2", Image 6 1/2 x 8 1/4"; Unframed.


The 1950 Walt Disney feature film "Cinderella" was based on the French version of the tale by Charles Perrault, entitled "Cinderella" and written in 1698. The film was the second in the series of great Princess films developed by Disney, the first being Snow White in 1937. The character of Cinderella is usually front and center in the pantheon of Disney Princess merchandise, perhaps because she is the only Princess not to be of a noble blood line who ended up marrying a Prince and becoming royalty.

Lucifer was the name of the pet cat of Lady Tremaine, Cinderella's evil Stepmother. The name Lucifer, a synonym of Satan, was chosen by Walt Disney himself probably due to his known hatred of cats. Lucifer was largely created for comic relief from the main storyline of Cinderella. Ward Kimball, the animator for Lucifer, was also responsible for the comedic subplot of the cat-and-mouse chase scenes between the cat and the two featured mice of the film, Jaq and Gus. His design for Lucifer was largely inspired by a pet cat belonging to Kimball himself; and Kimball's excellent animation skills have made Lucifer one of Disney's greatest Villains!


Original production animation cel of Lucifer without the background.

Lucifer was voiced by the very well known voice actress, June Foray. Foray worked for many different animation studios and is probably most well known as the voice of Cindy Lou Who, in Chuck Jone's holiday favorite "How The Grinch Stole Christmas," 1966. Chuck Jones is reported to have said, "June Foray is not the female Mel Blanc, Mel Blanc was the male June Foray."

This is a wonderful original production animation cel of Lady Tremaine's wicked and sinister cat, Lucifer. Original artwork of Lucifer is very rare and this is a great piece. He is full figure with a great facial expression and the fur on his tail is standing on end. A great piece of vintage Walt Disney animation artwork from the full length masterpiece "Cinderella!"

Original Production Animation Cel of Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother) from "Cinderella," 1950


Original hand inked and hand painted production animation cel of Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother) set on a lithographic background from "Cinderella," 1950, Walt Disney Studios; Size - Stepmother: 6 1/2 x 5 1/4", Image 7 x 5 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Often, patrons would be horrified or dismayed by the behavior of a villain, but more people actually hated the Stepmother more than any other villain we ever created." - Ollie Johnson and Frank Thomas from "The Disney Villain," 1993

Eleanor Audley (TV and film actress as well as familiar radio and animation voice talent) was filmed while she was dressed and speaking as the Stepmother; and as she performed scenes outlined in the film. Those film reels were used by animator Frank Thomas to convey even more realism to the character. Although the framed images were not directly copied by the animator, they were used as reference for lifelike movements. Eleanor Audley also voiced the Stepmother and her articulation conveyed the fire and raw power of the character. She could be sharp and curt in telling Cinderella what chores to do while lying in bed and slowly stirring her cup of tea, or her voice could be calm are cruel while watching as her daughters viciously destroyed Cinderella's dress.


Original production animation cel of Lady Tremaine (Wicked Stepmother).

Frank Thomas did a phenomenal job of controlling the Stepmother's actions to make sure that they were were not wild and out of control; but rather calculated, cold, and precise. The story of Cinderella presented a situation where a villain lived and interacted with her victim day after day under the same roof. The actions of the Stepmother seemed even more cruel because not only were both she and Cinderella animated in a very realistic fashion, but because of the close proximity the cruelness of the villain could be seen as even more intense by the reactions on Cinderella's face. If all this were not enough, the Stepmother's arsenal of evil was compounded by her two ill mannered daughters Anastasia and Drizella; as well as Lucifer the cat, who delighted in trying to kill Cinderella's mouse friends.

This cel is from the very famous scene when Cinderella, wearing the pink dress that was made for her by her mice and bird friends, races down the stairs just as Tremaine and her two daughter are leaving for the Ball. Lady Tremaine realizes that the dress is composed of elements from her daughters Anastasia's and Drizella's wardrobes. When the Stepmother points this out, both Anastasia and Drizella tear Cinderella's dress apart. As Cinderella stands there in the foyer in tattered rags, Lady Tremaine says, "Girls, girls. That's quite enough. Hurry along, now, both of you. I won't have you upsetting yourselves." The Stepmother takes one look at Cinderella before leaving and says simply, "Good night" while she opened and then closed the front door, as she and her two daughters leave for the Ball. A great piece of vintage Walt Disney animation artwork from the full length masterpiece "Cinderella!"