Translate

Monday, January 22, 2018

Original Production Animation Cels of The Ant & The Aardvark from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71


Original hand painted production animation cels of The Ant and The Aardvark from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Aardvark: 6 1/2 x 3 1/4", Ant: 1 1/2 x 1 1/4", Image 10 x 12"; Unframed.


DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cel of The Aardvark without the background.


Close up of the original production animation cel of The Aardvark without the background.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Original production animation cel of The Ant without the background.


Close up of the original production animation cel of The Ant without the background.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

The Ant and The Aardvark cartoon shorts center on a blue aardvark (voiced by John Byner who was impersonating the comedian Jackie Mason) trying to catch and eat a red ant named Charlie (also voiced by John Byner but impersonating Dean Martin). The Aardvark's trunk sucking was the sound of a vacuum cleaner. The series was enormously popular, but only 17 shorts were every produced. Unique techniques were employed for the series, including making the Aardvark and his clothing (shorts and t-shirt) all one color blue; and the Ant was painted all red. This allowed for the two characters to clearly stand out on the brightly colored backgrounds. Another production element was the jazzy musical score that was directed by Doug Goodwin. He assembled a group jazz session musicians to perform the opening/closing credits and the musical cues; and for the first time in animated cartoon history all six of the musicians received on screen credit.

This is a spectacular cel setup of both The Aardvark and The Ant from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71. Both characters are full figure and eyes open, and The Ant is wearing a baseball cap and glove. This is an extremely rare collection of original production animation artwork, and a great addition to any collection!

Original Production Animation Cels of The Ant & The Aardvark from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71


Original hand painted production animation cels of The Ant and The Aardvark from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Aardvark: 6 1/2 x 3 1/4", Ant: 1 1/2 x 1 1/4", Image 10 x 12"; Unframed.


DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cel of The Aardvark without the background.


Close up of the original production animation cel of The Aardvark without the background.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Original production animation cel of The Ant without the background.


Close up of the original production animation cel of The Ant without the background.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

The Ant and The Aardvark cartoon shorts center on a blue aardvark (voiced by John Byner who was impersonating the comedian Jackie Mason) trying to catch and eat a red ant named Charlie (also voiced by John Byner but impersonating Dean Martin). The Aardvark's trunk sucking was the sound of a vacuum cleaner. The series was enormously popular, but only 17 shorts were every produced. Unique techniques were employed for the series, including making the Aardvark and his clothing (shorts and t-shirt) all one color blue; and the Ant was painted all red. This allowed for the two characters to clearly stand out on the brightly colored backgrounds. Another production element was the jazzy musical score that was directed by Doug Goodwin. He assembled a group jazz session musicians to perform the opening/closing credits and the musical cues; and for the first time in animated cartoon history all six of the musicians received on screen credit.

This is a spectacular cel setup of both The Aardvark and The Ant from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71. Both characters are full figure and eyes open, and The Ant is wearing a baseball cap and glove. This is an extremely rare collection of original production animation artwork, and a great addition to any collection!

Original Production Animation Cels of The Ant & The Aardvark from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71


Original hand painted production animation cels of The Ant and The Aardvark from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Aardvark: 6 1/2 x 3 1/4", Ant: 1 1/2 x 1 1/4", Image 10 x 12"; Unframed.


DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cel of The Aardvark without the background.


Close up of the original production animation cel of The Aardvark without the background.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Original production animation cel of The Ant without the background.


Close up of the original production animation cel of The Ant without the background.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

The Ant and The Aardvark cartoon shorts center on a blue aardvark (voiced by John Byner who was impersonating the comedian Jackie Mason) trying to catch and eat a red ant named Charlie (also voiced by John Byner but impersonating Dean Martin). The Aardvark's trunk sucking was the sound of a vacuum cleaner. The series was enormously popular, but only 17 shorts were every produced. Unique techniques were employed for the series, including making the Aardvark and his clothing (shorts and t-shirt) all one color blue; and the Ant was painted all red. This allowed for the two characters to clearly stand out on the brightly colored backgrounds. Another production element was the jazzy musical score that was directed by Doug Goodwin. He assembled a group jazz session musicians to perform the opening/closing credits and the musical cues; and for the first time in animated cartoon history all six of the musicians received on screen credit.

This is a spectacular cel setup of both The Aardvark and The Ant from "The Ant and The Aardvark," 1970-71. Both characters are full figure and eyes open, and The Ant is wearing a baseball cap and glove. This is an extremely rare collection of original production animation artwork, and a great addition to any collection!

Sunday, January 21, 2018

Original Production Animation Drawing of Ursula from "The Little Mermaid," 1989


Original production animation drawing of Ursula in blue pencil from "The Little Mermaid," 1989, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 7 upper and lower right; Animation ladder upper right; Size - Ursula: 10 x 12 1/4", Sheet 10 1/2 x 13"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Babies! My poor little poopsies!" - Ursula 

"The Little Mermaid," is an American animated musical fantasy film and the 28th film in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series. It was produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures to theaters on November 17, 1989. The film was based on the Danish fairy tale of the same name by Hans Christian Andersen, which tells the story of a beautiful mermaid princess who dreams of becoming human. The film was written, directed, and produced by Ron Clements and John Musker; with music by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman. The voice cast includes: Jodi Benson, Christopher Daniel Barnes, Pat Carroll, Samuel E. Wright, Jason Marin, Kenneth Mars, Buddy Hackett, and René Auberjonois.

"The Little Mermaid," 1989 was the final Disney film using hand painted animation cels. Disney Studios, specifically Ron Clements and John Musker, adapted the Hans Christian Anderson story to give the villain a much bigger role. The first choice to voice the character was Beatrice Arthur who turned down the part. It was eventually accepted by veteran stage actress Elaine Stritch; however she clashed with the music stylist. The voice was finally given to Pat Caroll who described the role as, "part Shakespearean actress, with all the flair, flamboyance and theatricality, and part used-car salesman with a touch of con artist." Although I would have loved to have heard Arthur and Stritch sing "Pour Unfortunate Souls," Ursula is the absolute embodiment of Caroll and I think she was the best choice!


Close up of the production number.


Close up of the animation ladder.

The animation of the character was initially offered to Glen Keane, however after hearing Jodi Benson sing "Part of Your World" he wanted to animate Ariel instead and so Ursula ended up going to Disney animator, Ruben Aquino. Aquino credits Ursula as his favorite character in which he has ever worked and said, "When animating Ursula, I was inspired mainly by the voice and by the story sketches, but of course, I also worked very closely with the directors (John Musker and Ron Clements) to realize their vision. Given a great voice, the scenes almost animate themselves, and that definitely was the case with Pat Carroll's amazing vocal performance. I also did a lot of research on octopus locomotion to make sure Ursula's movements were convincing."

This is an outstanding drawing from Ursula's final battle with King Triton, Prince Eric, and Ariel. King Triton, in order to save Ariel, makes a trade with Ursula for him to become her prisoner. Ursula then gains the crown and King Trident's magical trident. She uses the trident to try and destroy Eric, but it is misdirected by Ariel; causing Ursula to accidentally destroys her two pet eels Flotsam and Jetsam. This is a large drawing of Ursula wearing the crown. The dialog for this drawing is below:

Ursula: "Babies! My poor little poopsies!"

Original Production Animation Drawing of Ursula from "The Little Mermaid," 1989


Original production animation drawing of Ursula in graphite and blue pencils from "The Little Mermaid," 1989, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 9 upper and lower right; Animation ladder upper right; Size - Ursula: 6 3/4 x 8 1/2", Sheet 10 1/2 x 12 1/2"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"You got it, sweetcakes. No talking, singing, zip." - Ursula 

"The Little Mermaid," is an American animated musical fantasy film and the 28th film in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series. It was produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures to theaters on November 17, 1989. The film was based on the Danish fairy tale of the same name by Hans Christian Andersen, which tells the story of a beautiful mermaid princess who dreams of becoming human. The film was written, directed, and produced by Ron Clements and John Musker; with music by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman. The voice cast includes: Jodi Benson, Christopher Daniel Barnes, Pat Carroll, Samuel E. Wright, Jason Marin, Kenneth Mars, Buddy Hackett, and René Auberjonois.

"The Little Mermaid," 1989 was the final Disney film using hand painted animation cels. Disney Studios, specifically Ron Clements and John Musker, adapted the Hans Christian Anderson story to give the villain a much bigger role. The first choice to voice the character was Beatrice Arthur who turned down the part. It was eventually accepted by veteran stage actress Elaine Stritch; however she clashed with the music stylist. The voice was finally given to Pat Caroll who described the role as, "part Shakespearean actress, with all the flair, flamboyance and theatricality, and part used-car salesman with a touch of con artist." Although I would have loved to have heard Arthur and Stritch sing "Pour Unfortunate Souls," Ursula is the absolute embodiment of Caroll and I think she was the best choice!


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Ursula.

The animation of the character was initially offered to Glen Keane, however after hearing Jodi Benson sing "Part of Your World" he wanted to animate Ariel instead and so Ursula ended up going to Disney animator, Ruben Aquino. Aquino credits Ursula as his favorite character in which he has ever worked and said, "When animating Ursula, I was inspired mainly by the voice and by the story sketches, but of course, I also worked very closely with the directors (John Musker and Ron Clements) to realize their vision. Given a great voice, the scenes almost animate themselves, and that definitely was the case with Pat Carroll's amazing vocal performance. I also did a lot of research on octopus locomotion to make sure Ursula's movements were convincing."


Close up of the production number.


Close up of the animation ladder.

This is an outstanding drawing from Ursula's famous song "Poor Unfortunate Souls," one of the true highlights of the entire film! This drawing is from the most famous part of the sequence; when Ursula tells Ariel that in return for making her human, Ursula wants Ariel's voice as payment. The dialog for the scene is below:

Ursula: "Oh, and there is one more thing. We haven't discussed the subject of payment. You can't get something for nothing, you know."
Ariel: "But I don't have any..."
Ursula: "I'm not asking much. Just a token really, a trifle. You'll never even miss it. What I want from you is... Your voice."
Ariel: "My voice?"
Ursula: "You got it, sweetcakes. No talking, singing, zip."

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Original Production Animation Cels of Mad Madam Mim in Fox Form and Merlin in Rabbit Form from "The Sword In The Stone," 1963


Original hand painted production animation cels of Mad Madam Mim in Fox form and Merlin in Rabbit form from "The Sword In The Stone," 1963, Walt Disney Studios; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Madam Mim: 1 x 4", Merlin: 1 3/4 x 2", Image 6 1/2 x 7 3/4"; Unframed.

To purchase these cels or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"The Sword in the Stone," 1963 is the 18th full length feature film produced by Walt Disney and it was released on December 25, 1963 by Buena Vista Distribution. The film was based on the novel of the same name, that was first published in 1938. It was later republished in 1958 as the first book of T. H. White's tetralogy "The Once and Future King." It was to be the final Disney animated film released before Walt Disney's death on December 15, 1966. The songs in the film were written and composed by the Sherman Brothers, who would become very famous for their future work on later Disney films including; "Mary Poppins," 1964, "The Jungle Book," 1967, and "Bedknobs and Broomsticks," 1971.


Original production animation cel of Mad Madam Mim in Fox Form without the background.


Original production animation cel of Merlin in Rabbit Form without the background.

Merlin is a very powerful wizard with a pet owl named Archimedes. He befriends and becomes the teacher of a 12-year old orphan named Arthur, who goes by the name of Wart. Merlin is first seen living in a forest cottage, and he believes in the philosophy of "Brain over Brawn." As a wizard, he is very intelligent, has a wide variety of powers, and is considered the most powerful wizard in the world. He has the ability to see into the future, and has the ability to shape-shift. Merlin was animated by Milt Kahl, Frank Thomas, and Ollie Johnston; and voiced by Karl Swenson who was an American theater, radio, film, and television actor.

Madam Mim was the villain in the film and was voiced by Martha Wentworth, a veteran actress with a long radio history dating back to the 1920's. She was the voice of several Disney characters in "101 Dalmatians" including Nanny; and Mim was her final credited role. Madam Mim was animated by two of Disney's greatest animators Milt Kahl (who also designed the character, refining storyboard sketches from animator Bill Peet), and Frank Thomas. Kahl animated her first appearance in the film, her initial interaction with Arthur; while Frank Thomas oversaw her famous "Wizards' Duel" with Merlin.

Although Mim claims to be more powerful than Merlin, during her opening scene she does only minor tricks. When Merlin stops her from attacking Arthur she challenges him to a Wizard's duel which involves mutating into various forms in order to best your opponent. She states that she is "mad for games," and lays out the rules for her duel with Merlin.

MADAM MIM: "Now, rule one, no mineral or vegetable. Only animal. Rule two, no make-believe things like, pink dragons and stuff. Now, rule three, no disappearing."
MERLIN: "Rule four, no cheating."
MADAM MIM: "All right, all right."

At the very start of the duel, Mim breaks her own rule by disappearing and proves she can not be trusted. During the battle, Mim's incredible shape shifting abilities almost give her the upper hand against Merlin. Merlin transforms himself into various blue forms including: a turtle, rabbit, rooster, elephant, tiger, crab, and a goat. Mim turned herself into: an alligator, fox, hen, elephant, tiger, rattlesnake, and a rhinoceros, all of which were colored pink and finally into an ugly, purple, fire-breathing dragon. She then asks Merlin (knowing that her rule stated no Pink Dragons), "Did I say no purple Dragons?" However, Merlin outsmarts her by transforming into a fictional germ called "Malignalitaloptereosis" that infects her with a chickenpox-like disease complete with red spots and a fever; effectively defeating her and illustrating the importance of knowledge over strength.

This is a two cel setup of Mad Madam Mim in Fox form and Merlin in Rabbit form. Both characters are full figure and eyes open. A rare and wonderful two cel setup from one of the most memorable scenes in the entire film! A great addition to any animation art collection.

Original Production Animation Cel and Drawing of The Ant & The Aardvark from "Hasty But Tasty," 1969


Original hand painted production animation cel of The Ant & The Aardvark with matching drawing from "Hasty But Tasty," 1969, Depatie-Freleng Enterprises; Set on an original hand-painted production animation background w/ hand painted overlay cel from the Tijuana Toads cartoon "The Egg and Ay-Yi-Yi!," 1971; Production numbers upper overlay cel edge; Size - Aardvark: 4 1/2 x 7 1/4", Ant: 1 1/4 x 1 1/4", Background: 10 1/2 x 13 1/4, Image 9 1/2 x 12 1/4"; Unframed.


DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, (1963-1981) was an American animation company that was based in Burbank, California. It produced theatrical cartoons, animated series, commercials, film title design sequences, and television specials; but was most known for The Pink Panther film titles and cartoon shorts, as well as the Dr. Seuss cartoon adaptations made for CBS and ABC. The company was founded by two former Warner Bros. Cartoons employees, director/composer/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie. Although Freleng and DePatie were no longer working for Warner Bros., they were able to lease the former Warner cartoons studio, complete with equipment and supplies, for only a few dollars each year.


Original production animation cel of The Ant & The Aardvark on a production background.


Original production animation cel of The Ant and The Aardvark without the background.


Close up of the original production animation cel of The Ant and The Aardvark without the background.


Original production animation drawing of The Aardvark.


Close up of the drawing production numbers.

Director Blake Edwards contacted DePatie-Freleng and asked them to design a panther character for Edwards's new film, The Pink Panther; and they would also produce the animated titles for the film. The opening titles were hugely popular and soon DePatie-Freleng contracted with United Artists to produce a series of cartoon shorts featuring the Pink Panther. The first entry in the Pink Panther series, The Pink Phink, was directed by Freleng; and won the studio its only Academy Award in 1964. In 1967, DePatie-Freleng would receive another Academy Award nomination for The Pink Blueprint. The studio created over 100 Pink Panther shorts for both theatrical release and television through 1980.

Henry Mancini composed "The Pink Panther Theme" for the live action films, which was also used in the cartoon series. Doug Goodwin composed the show's opening title music, while William Lava and Walter Greene composed music scores heard throughout the cartoons; many of which were derivations of Mancini's composition.


Original hand-painted production animation background showing all edges.


Close up of the background production numbers.

The Pink Panther theatrical series of cartoons became the basis of a Saturday morning television series, The Pink Panther Show. The series (1969-1980) also included cartoons of The Inspector; and eventually The Ant and the Aardvark, Tijuana Toads (a.k.a. Texas Toads), Hoot Kloot, Misterjaw, Roland and Rattfink, The Dogfather, and two Tijuana Toads spinoffs: The Blue Racer and Crazylegs Crane. It was produced by Mirisch Films and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, and was broadcast on two American television networks: from September 6, 1969 to September 2, 1978, on NBC; and from September 9, 1978 to September 1, 1980, on ABC (as The All New Pink Panther Show). After nine years on NBC, the Pink Panther moved to ABC in 1978 and was titled The All New Pink Panther Show, where it lasted one season before leaving the network realm entirely. The ABC version of the series featured sixteen episodes with 32 new Pink Panther cartoons, and 16 featuring Crazylegs Crane.

Over its 11 years on various television networks, The Pink Panther Show had a variety of names:
The Pink Panther Show (1969–1970)
The Pink Panther Meets the Ant and the Aardvark (1970–1971)
The New Pink Panther Show (1971–1974)
The Pink Panther and Friends (1974–1976)
It's the All New Pink Panther Laugh-and-a-Half Hour-and-a-Half Show Introducing Misterjaw (1976–1977)
Think Pink Panther (1977–1978)
The All New Pink Panther Show (1978–1980)

The Ant and The Aardvark cartoon shorts center on a blue aardvark (voiced by John Byner who was impersonating the comedian Jackie Mason) trying to catch and eat a red ant named Charlie (also voiced by John Byner but impersonating Dean Martin). The Aardvark's trunk sucking was the sound of a vacuum cleaner. The series was enormously popular, but only 17 shorts were every produced. Unique techniques were employed for the series, including making the Aardvark and his clothing (shorts and t-shirt) all one color blue; and the Ant was painted all red. This allowed for the two characters to clearly stand out on the brightly colored backgrounds. Another production element was the jazzy musical score that was directed by Doug Goodwin. He assembled a group jazz session musicians to perform the opening/closing credits and the musical cues; and for the first time in animated cartoon history all six of the musicians received on screen credit.

This is a spectacular cel setup of both The Aardvark and The Ant from the cartoon short "Hasty But Tasty," 1969, together with the matching original production animation drawing of The Aardvark. The Aardvark is chasing The Ant with a fly swatter, and both characters are full figure and eyes open. The cel is set on an original hand-painted production animation background w/ hand painted overlay cel from the Depatie-Freleng Tijuana Toads cartoon "The Egg and Ay-Yi-Yi!," 1971. This is an extremely rare collection of original production animation artwork, and a great addition to any collection!