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Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Original Hand-Painted Preliminary Production Background from "Mary Poppins," 1964


Original hand-painted preliminary production background on peg hole paper from "Mary Poppins," 1964, Walt Disney Studios; Production number lower right; Size - Background Image: 10 x 16", Sheet 12 1/2 x 16"; Unframed.


"It's Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious! Even though the sound of it is something quite atrocious."
- Mary Poppins

"Mary Poppins," 1964 was a musical fantasy feature film produced by Walt Disney Productions and was loosely based on P.L. Travers' book series of the same name. The film was directed by Robert Stevenson, with screenplay by Bill Walsh and Don DaGradi. "Mary Poppins" combined live-action with animation and stared Julie Andrews in the role of Mary Poppins; a practically perfect nanny who visited a dysfunctional family in London and employed a variety of techniques to improve the family's dynamic. Dick Van Dyke was brilliant in the supporting role of Bert.

"Mary Poppins" was released on August 27, 1964 to universal acclaim; receiving a total of 13 Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture. The film won five: Best Actress for Andrews, Best Film Editing, Best Original Music Score, Best Visual Effects, and Best Original Song for "Chim Chim Cher-ee." The popular success of the film in undoubtedly due to wonderful songs, that were written by the brilliant team of the Sherman Brothers.


Original preliminary background showing the entire sheet.

Close up of the production number.

This is an extremely rare original hand-painted preliminary production background from "Mary Poppins," 1964. The background was created for the mixed live action and animation sequences involving Mary Poppins, Bert, and the Banks children as they enter and explore Bert's sidewalk chalk drawings. This background is very similar to others that were used for the "Jolly Holiday" musical performance. A very detailed and beautiful work of art from one of the greatest Walt Disney films, and a wonderful addition to any animation art collection!

Original Production Animation Cel of Mad Madam Mim from "The Sword In The Stone," 1963


Original hand painted production animation cel of Mad Madam Mim from "The Sword In The Stone," 1963, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 11 in ink lower right; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Madam Mim: 7 1/2" x 6 1/4", Image 10" x 15"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Cause I'm the magnificent, marvelous, mad Madam Mim!" - Madam Mim 

"The Sword in the Stone," 1963 is the 18th full length feature film produced by Walt Disney and it was released on December 25, 1963 by Buena Vista Distribution. The film was based on the novel of the same name, that was first published in 1938. It was later republished in 1958 as the first book of T. H. White's tetralogy "The Once and Future King." It was to be the final Disney animated film released before Walt Disney's death on December 15, 1966. The songs in the film were written and composed by the Sherman Brothers, who would become very famous for their future work on later Disney films including; "Mary Poppins," 1964, "The Jungle Book," 1967, and "Bedknobs and Broomsticks," 1971.


Original production animation cel of Mad Madam Mim without the background.

Madam Mim was the villain in the film and was voiced by Martha Wentworth, a veteran actress with a long radio history dating back to the 1920's. She was the voice of several Disney characters in "101 Dalmatians" including Nanny; and Mim was her final credited role. Madam Mim was animated by two of Disney's greatest animators Milt Kahl (who also designed the character, refining storyboard sketches from animator Bill Peet), and Frank Thomas. Kahl animated her first appearance in the film, her initial interaction with Arthur; while Frank Thomas oversaw her famous "Wizards' Duel" with Merlin.

This is a great cel of Mad Madam Mim. This is a large image with her hands clasped on the side of her face, and her eyes are open. A spectacular original piece of animation artwork of one of Disney's most memorable contemporary villains!

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Original Production Animation Cel of Madame Medusa from "The Rescuers," 1977


Original hand-painted production animation cel of Madame Medusa from "The Rescuers," 1977, Walt Disney Studios; Numbered 89 in ink lower right; Set on a lithographic background; Size - Madame Medusa: 9 x 9 3/4", Image 9 3/4 x 15 3/4"; Unframed.

To purchase this cel or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"The Rescuers" is an animated feature film produced by Walt Disney Productions; and was released on June 22, 1977 by Buena Vista Distribution. The film is based on a series of books by Margery Sharp, most notably "The Rescuers and Miss Bianca." The 23rd film in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, the film is about the Rescue Aid Society; an international mouse organization headquartered in New York; and shadowed the United Nations. The Rescue Aid Society, a mouse based group, was dedicated to helping abduction victims around the world at large. Two of these mice, jittery janitor Bernard (voiced by Bob Newhart) and his co-agent, the elegant Miss Bianca (voiced by Eva Gabor), set out to rescue Penny, an orphan girl being held prisoner in the Devil's Bayou by treasure huntress Madame Medusa.

Early designs for Medusa were done by Ken Anderson, there were even discussions about bringing back Cruella deVil from "101 Dalmatians" as the villain; but that was eventually abandoned. The character of Medusa was eventually created and although there are many similarities with Cruella (thin build, similar cars, appear wealthy, bad tempers, cry upon realizing that they have lost, etc.), Medusa is still quite distinct with her wild red hair, sagging breasts, green eyes, and lots and lots of makeup. Her ultimate goal in the film is to possess the Devil's Eye, the world's largest diamond. Milt Kahl was given the task of animating Medusa and it is known that one his inspirations was his ex-wife. Kahl's brilliance in animation is really showcased with this character and many point to the scene where she is removing her false eyelashes as proof of his technical skill.


Original production animation cel of Madame Medusa without the background.

The next three paragraphs are from veteran Walt Disney animator Andreas Deja:
"When Milt Kahl was asked in an interview if he had a favorite character he animated, his response was: "Oh I enjoyed a few, I just loved doing Madame Mim, Shere Khan was a lot of fun, and so were the butler and old lawyer in 'Aristocats'. But I guess I enjoyed Medusa more than any one of them." And it shows. His last animation assignment at Disney -just like Marc Davis's- was a tour de force of character acting. It has a "I'm going to give it all" feel to it.

Marc told me that Milt promised him, Medusa will "wipe his Cruella off the screen". Then he added with a chuckle: "Of course that didn't happen". So there was definitely a friendly competition going on between these two great animators and their characters. Milt sort of designed Medusa's features opposite from Cruella's.  Cruella  has a small nose, Medusa's is longer. Cruella's hair parts in the middle, Medusa's off to one side. Cruella has a pointy jaw, Medusa is almost chin less etc.

I have to admit, when I first saw Medusa in "The Rescuers" in a London theater, I couldn't believe my eyes. So much inventiveness in her drawing and motion. How on earth can you show an animated character removing her make up? Wasn't that something only a live actress could pull off...but in animation? Incredible! I have spent way too much time studying this character, on the other hand I think I got a lot out of it. Dialogue, graphic but dimensional drawing and just being gutsy in general."
This is a spectacular cel of Madam Medusa! She is eyes open and smiling. Both arms and her hands are visible in this very large image, and a towel is wrapped around her hair. A great piece of Disney animation artwork, perfect for any collection!

Original Production Animation Drawing of Merlin from "The Sword In The Stone," 1963


Original production animation drawing of Merlin in graphite and purple pencils from "The Sword In The Stone," 1963, Walt Disney Studios; Signed by Ollie Johnston center right; Numbered 43 upper left and lower right; Animation ladder upper left; Size - Merlin: 11 x 9 1/2", Sheet 12 1/2 x 15 1/2"; Unframed.


"The Sword in the Stone," 1963 is the 18th full length feature film produced by Walt Disney and it was released on December 25, 1963 by Buena Vista Distribution. The film was based on the novel of the same name, that was first published in 1938. It was later republished in 1958 as the first book of T. H. White's tetralogy "The Once and Future King." It was to be the final Disney animated film released before Walt Disney's death on December 15, 1966. The songs in the film were written and composed by the Sherman Brothers, who would become very famous for their future work on later Disney films including; "Mary Poppins," 1964, "The Jungle Book," 1967, and "Bedknobs and Broomsticks," 1971.


Close up of the original production animation drawing of Merlin and the Ollie Johnston signature.

Merlin is a very powerful wizard with a pet owl named Archimedes. He befriends and becomes the teacher of a 12-year old orphan named Arthur, who goes by the name of Wart. Merlin is first seen living in a forest cottage, and he believes in the philosophy of "Brain over Brawn." As a wizard, he is very intelligent, has a wide variety of powers, and is considered the most powerful wizard in the world. He has the ability to see into the future, and has the ability to shape-shift. Merlin was animated by Milt Kahl, Frank Thomas, and Ollie Johnston; and voiced by Karl Swenson who was an American theater, radio, film, and television actor.

This is a great drawing of Merlin, he is eyes and mouth open and holding a teapot. In addition, the drawing is hand signed by his animator, Ollie Johnston. A very rare and wonderful drawing of the great wizard from one of Walt Disney's most memorable contemporary films.

Original Production Animation Drawing of Pinocchio from "Pinocchio," 1940


Original production animation drawing in red, green, blue, and graphite pencils of Pinocchio from "Pinocchio," 1940, Walt Disney Studios; Production stamp and numbered C29 1/2 lower right; Size - Pinocchio and shadow: 5 3/4 x 6 3/4", Sheet: 10 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Pinocchio," 1940 was the second animated feature film produced by Disney, and followed on the success of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." 1937. It was released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictures on February 23, 1940 and was based on the Italian children's novel "The Adventures of Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi. The general plot of the film involves an old wood-carver named Geppetto, who carves a wooden puppet that he names Pinocchio. One night the puppet is brought to life by the Blue Fairy, who informs him that he can become a real boy if he proves himself to be "brave, truthful, and unselfish". Pinocchio's journey to become a real boy is challenged by his encounters with an array of scrupulous characters.

"Pinocchio" became the first animated feature to win an Academy Award; it won for both Best Music - Original Score and for Best Music - Original Song for "When You Wish Upon A Star." Most critics and audiences agree that "Pinocchio" is among the finest Disney features ever made, and one of the greatest animated films of all time. In 1994, it was added to the United States National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."


Close up of the original animation drawing of Pinocchio.

Due to the huge success of "Snow White," Walt Disney wanted more famous voice actors for "Pinocchio." He cast popular singer Cliff Edwards (who had made the first record selling over a million copies) as Jiminy Cricket. Disney also wanted the character of Pinocchio to be voiced by a real child. The role ended up going to twelve year old actor Dickie Jones, who had previously been in Frank Capra's enormous Hollywood hit, "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington."

Animation began in September 1938 and just as in "Snow White," live-action footage was shot for "Pinocchio" with the actors playing the scenes; which was supervised by Hamilton Luske. The animators then used the footage as a guide for their animation drawings by studying the human movement and then incorporating many of those poses and scenes. The title character was animated by Milt Kahl (initial design), Frank Thomas, and Ollie Johnston. "When I was doing Pinocchio," Johnston said, "I thought of the character being real, a living person, not a drawing."


Close up of the production stamp and production number.

"Give a Little Whistle," one of the memorable songs featured in "Pinocchio," was composed by Leigh Harline with lyrics by Ned Washington. The song is sung by Jiminy Cricket (voiced by Cliff Edwards), and the performance and animation is one of the nicest sequences in the film. In the song, Jiminy tries to explain the matters of being a conscience to Pinocchio, and tells him if he needs him all he has to do is "give a little whistle." This is a wonderful drawing from the "Give a Little Whistle" sequence and the image of Pinocchio is perfect; as he is whistling into the bottom of his hat. The drawing is rendered in red, green, and graphite pencils on peg hole animation paper, and this would be a great addition to any animation art collection!

Original Production Animation Drawing of Pinocchio from "Pinocchio," 1940


Original production animation drawing in red, green, and graphite pencils of Pinocchio from "Pinocchio," 1940, Walt Disney Studios; Production stamp and numbered C77 lower right; Size - Pinocchio and shadow: 7 x 8 1/4", Sheet: 10 x 12"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"Pinocchio," 1940 was the second animated feature film produced by Disney, and followed on the success of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." 1937. It was released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictures on February 23, 1940 and was based on the Italian children's novel "The Adventures of Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi. The general plot of the film involves an old wood-carver named Geppetto, who carves a wooden puppet that he names Pinocchio. One night the puppet is brought to life by the Blue Fairy, who informs him that he can become a real boy if he proves himself to be "brave, truthful, and unselfish". Pinocchio's journey to become a real boy is challenged by his encounters with an array of scrupulous characters.

"Pinocchio" became the first animated feature to win an Academy Award; it won for both Best Music - Original Score and for Best Music - Original Song for "When You Wish Upon A Star." Most critics and audiences agree that "Pinocchio" is among the finest Disney features ever made, and one of the greatest animated films of all time. In 1994, it was added to the United States National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."


Close up of the original animation drawing of Pinocchio.

Due to the huge success of "Snow White," Walt Disney wanted more famous voice actors for "Pinocchio." He cast popular singer Cliff Edwards (who had made the first record selling over a million copies) as Jiminy Cricket. Disney also wanted the character of Pinocchio to be voiced by a real child. The role ended up going to twelve year old actor Dickie Jones, who had previously been in Frank Capra's enormous Hollywood hit, "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington."

Animation began in September 1938 and just as in "Snow White," live-action footage was shot for "Pinocchio" with the actors playing the scenes; which was supervised by Hamilton Luske. The animators then used the footage as a guide for their animation drawings by studying the human movement and then incorporating many of those poses and scenes. The title character was animated by Milt Kahl (initial design), Frank Thomas, and Ollie Johnston. "When I was doing Pinocchio," Johnston said, "I thought of the character being real, a living person, not a drawing."


Close up of the production stamp and production number.

"Give a Little Whistle," one of the memorable songs featured in "Pinocchio," was composed by Leigh Harline with lyrics by Ned Washington. The song is sung by Jiminy Cricket (voiced by Cliff Edwards), and the performance and animation is one of the nicest sequences in the film. In the song, Jiminy tries to explain the matters of being a conscience to Pinocchio, and tells him if he needs him all he has to do is "give a little whistle." This is a wonderful drawing from the "Give a Little Whistle" sequence and the image of Pinocchio is perfect; as he is looking up into the bottom of his hat. The drawing is rendered in red, green, and graphite pencils on peg hole animation paper, and this would be a great addition to any animation art collection!

Thursday, February 8, 2018

John Pomeroy Signed Original Production Animation Drawing of Milo Thatch from "Atlantis: The Lost Empire," 2001


Original production animation drawing of Milo Thatch in graphite pencil from "Atlantis: The Lost Empire," 2001, Walt Disney Studios; Signed in graphite pencil by John Pomeroy lower center; Numbered 51 lower right; Size - Milo Thatch: 9 x 7 1/2", Sheet 12 1/2 x 17"; Unframed.

To purchase this drawing or to visit the Art Gallery, CLICK HERE!

"I will find Atlantis on my own, even if I have to rent a rowboat!" - Milo James Thatch

"Atlantis: The Lost Empire," 2001 is an animated science fantasy action adventure film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. It was the first science fiction feature film created by Disney and the 41st film overall. The story is set in 1914 and tells the story of a young man named Milo Thatch who gains possession of a sacred book that he believes will guide him, and a crew of mercenaries, to the lost city of Atlantis. The film was inspired by the works of Jules Verne and was notable for adopting the distinctive visual style of comic book creator Mike Mignola. It was directed by Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise, produced by Don Hahn, and written by Tab Murphy. "Atlantis" features an ensemble voice cast including: Michael J. Fox, Cree Summer, James Garner, Leonard Nimoy, Don Novello, Phil Morris, Claudia Christian, Jacqueline Obradors, and Jim Varney.


Close up of the signed John Pomperoy original production animation drawing of Milo Thatch.

Milo James Thatch is a linguist and cartographer working at the Smithsonian Museum. He was recruited to decipher "The Shepherd's Journal," while directing an expedition to the lost city of Atlantis. The American actor Michael J. Fox provided the voice for Milo. In the film, Milo's complaint about how much he does not like carrots, after puking over the ship that was used to launch the "Ulysses," was ad-libbed by Fox. It is notable that Fox is allergic to carrots.

John Foster Pomeroy (b. 1951) is an American animator, producer, and screenwriter. He has worked for several studios including The Walt Disney Company and Sullivan Bluth Studios. In "Atlantis: The Lost Empire," Pomeroy was the supervising animator for Milo and was challenged to try and determine how a linguist would look. According to Marc Okrand, who developed the Atlantean language used in the film, Pomeroy used him as the basis for the character design of Milo.


Close up of the production number.

This is a very nice three quarters image of the main character in "Atlantis," Milo James Thatch. He is eyes and mouth open, and both of his hands are out gesturing in front of him. He is peering over top of his eyeglasses, and the drawing is hand signed by Walt Disney supervising animator John Pomeroy. A great piece of animation artwork, perfect for any collection!